Re: Fell Out Of Love With A Story

#2
Step 1 - find out why you no longer love your story. Is it a plot problem? Are you discouraged because it takes too long to go to the good stuff? Is someone/something external discouraging you? Are you having a burnout? Step 2 - try to eliminate the problem. Try to remember why you liked the story - the characters, the lore, the adventure, the comedy,  the tears. 
If you are having a burnout, take a short break from writing and do something else but still related to the story so that you don't end up in an eternal hiatus. I make covers and maps for the future books, do research into weapons, ancient history, the flora and fauna of Siberia.
If someone is discouraging you, plug your ears and believe in yourself. 

Re: Fell Out Of Love With A Story

#7
I have this problem a lot, unfortunately :/ I come up with new ideas once or twice a month, but a lot of them I’ve lost interest in writing. I’ve had problems with losing interest ever since I started writing, so my solution (as used for Fallen, and all of my fanfics) was to finish writing it all before posting. In my longer works (Gin and Kuro), I’ve built up a massive backlog—50 chapters, I believe—so I could take a break from writing if I needed to. All that does is prevent me from stop posting a story in the middle of it due to disinterest, though.

I’d like to echo what Ariana Vivoni said; look through your story, and see if there’s something specific that’s boring you. It could be a character, a plot point, whatever—if it’s there, then try to fix it. I don’t have much advice otherwise, since my method is “drop and never return” (meaning quite a few fanfics and original stories over the years) or “work through it” (my current relationship with Gin and Kuro).
If it’s a matter of where the plot’s going—whether it isn’t, or you don’t like the direction—try taking a break for a little bit. Notify your readers that the story will be going on a hiatus, and look towards other projects for a while if it helps.

Re: Fell Out Of Love With A Story

#8
I don't necessarily have this problem so much anymore.

I've learned over the years there is a better way for me to write. One where I give myself enough time and write with as little pressure as I can manage.

And if I find myself not wanting to work on my story. It is time for a break and a troubleshooting session where I figure out what went wrong. Is it the story or is it my mind. 80% of the time, it's all in my head.


Re: Fell Out Of Love With A Story

#9
Lol anyone who sits here and says they are 100% passionate from start to finish about the book they're writing is full of shit. Change my mind.

The human brain is not designed to feel passionate about an idea, project, story, job, etc, for more than a week's worth of hours. Writing is no different than getting up in the morning and going to work. You do it at first out of genuine excitement that you landed a new role, and then out of discipline. It becomes a mechanical routine and you start doing it like a machine. The passion dwindles, perhaps comes back at times, but nonetheless dwindles. More disciplined people will finish the book. More disciplined people will continue to get up in the morning to go to work. 

I can't remember the bestselling author who said it, but around the "30,000-word" mark is where this passion, so to speak, dwindles. It comes back again at around 70,000, and then dwindles again until you finish it. I feel there should be a Law of 30,000 Words in the writing community.

Point is

Quote:Step 1 - find out why you no longer love your story. Is it a plot problem? Are you discouraged because it takes too long to go to the good stuff? Is someone/something external discouraging you? Are you having a burnout? Step 2 - try to eliminate the problem. Try to remember why you liked the story - the characters, the lore, the adventure, the comedy,  the tears.
This doesn't work for most writers. If it did, we would be sitting here with 1000-page books. But we're not. Your passion did not stay alight for that long. Your discipline did. This is an important distinction to make because these statements look like barriers of doubt rather than accepting that there are issues that can be fixed down the line. People will call your work shit. You will feel drained after writing a thousand, 2 thousand, sometimes 3 thousand words. Take a break, come back to it. Coming back to it is the discipline. Rather than trying to eliminate a nominal problem, accept that the only person stopping you from continuing is you and everything else is superficial bullshit used to wrap your ego in a bandage. 

If the work is affecting your mental or physical health, stop. That's where discipline becomes torture. 

Quote:It's possible to write without passion.

Maybe try it and decide If it's for you.

IMO, disinterest can, but doesn't have to carry into the story.

Agree with this.

Quote:Upload a last chapter explaining it if you feel so inclined and then mark your story as dropped/on hiatus. It is not complicated.
If you want to be a quitter, sure. Why don't you quit your job while you're at it? Oh, you need the money. You also need the experience to know what it's like to finish a book. At least get that far. Then quit as much as you want, but do it sooner rather than later.

Health before wealth. Your health is your wealth. 

Quote:Try to finish things before posting them here, in the future.

Its not an admonishment, but as someone that often drops projects halfway, that has been my method.
This is probably the best advice. The more people that see your story, the less you want to actually do it. You are approaching an audience with your pants down. Having the discipline to finish it and perhaps edit it, either through self-scrutinizing or Scribophile (because no other site is quite as good as that) or professionally paid means, is more important than humiliating yourself with a first draft thinking it's going to wow anyone other than chubby blue-box enjoyers. 

Quote:I’d like to echo what Ariana Vivoni said; look through your story, and see if there’s something specific that’s boring you. It could be a character, a plot point, whatever—if it’s there, then try to fix it. I don’t have much advice otherwise, since my method is “drop and never return” (meaning quite a few fanfics and original stories over the years) or “work through it” (my current relationship with Gin and Kuro).
If it’s a matter of where the plot’s going—whether it isn’t, or you don’t like the direction—try taking a break for a little bit. Notify your readers that the story will be going on a hiatus, and look towards other projects for a while if it helps.
Once again, I will reiterate that the issue is your discipline, not any of this superficial crap. You're not going to get this right in a single run. And looking back and realising you can't fix it, or that it requires too much work to fix, will make you stop continuing. Watch. Trust me, take these twos' advice and see for yourself.

And before anyone says something: This is a collection of everything I have heard and seen not only on this site but throughout my entire writing career. People see an issue, they lack the discipline, and they stop. It's that simple. The only way around it is to work on self-discipline. I don't disagree that some people can do this. The majority (and especially the OP) can't. The advice applies to people who literally already have the work ethic, not to those who lack it. 

Re: Fell Out Of Love With A Story

#10
I rarely have as much time as I'd like to write these days.  Sometimes five minutes is too much.  But I do agree that passion and desire is not required in order to write.

You can treat it like a job and put your butt in the seat and pound out the words.  I've done that.  A month later I look back over things while editing and can't tell the difference between what came out easy and what was hard.  

There is nothing so common in this world as unrealized potential.  This applies to stories written, too.  Anything worth doing requires sweat and effort.