Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#61

LashBrown Wrote: Ahh, I know exactly what you mean! It's too often that I see a new Light Novel pop up and get extremely disappointed when I just see "Ooh look at me infinitely powerful mana supply and skills I'm popular with girls because of this (also I'm edgy even though I was a wimp in my previous life)"

It just comes off as mega-lazy writing when the characters Feel 2D (for lack of a better term). What I mean is they don't feel like they have a life outside the MC's POV, they just sort of exist when the MC's there to progress the plot and nothing more!
One day a new age of writers will appear and finally figure out novelty is where it's at, and the same old stuff won't hopefully sell as much.

I don't mind Overpowered characters, as long as they can make something interesting with them. Overlord and One Punch Man for example, are excellent stories that take the OP Protagonist and make it enjoyable.

But, the stuff I read on RR, Scribblehub and some other sites, I'd say... Grand majority is the cookie-cut of what you described.


Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#63

LashBrown Wrote: I'm interested in the community's thoughts on this, was it even a book that inspired you? A Light Novel?
What was the moment you just sat down one day and said "I'm doing this!"
When I was a kid up until I was around twenty-two, I had only ever read some YA fiction and classics. I thought that's what fiction consisted of. Then I went on a horror movie spree looking for horror in space. Watched everything good, and got the bright idea to ask online if there were any good "adult" novels of that sort. I was recommended Revelation Space by Alestair Reynolds. It's hard dark sci-fi, and wow was I blown away! I had to write after that.

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#66

AWanderingWarlock Wrote:
LashBrown Wrote: I'm interested in the community's thoughts on this, was it even a book that inspired you? A Light Novel? 
What was the moment you just sat down one day and said "I'm doing this!"


I was inspired by a LitRPG game from playstore named "Magium", and after reading its book 1 and 2, my own fantasy inside my head took off and the rest is history...
I've never tried LitRPGs, what makes them so enjoyable for you? Apart from Magium, is there any others you would recommend?

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#67

LambentTyto Wrote:
LashBrown Wrote: I'm interested in the community's thoughts on this, was it even a book that inspired you? A Light Novel?
What was the moment you just sat down one day and said "I'm doing this!"
When I was a kid up until I was around twenty-two, I had only ever read some YA fiction and classics. I thought that's what fiction consisted of. Then I went on a horror movie spree looking for horror in space. Watched everything good, and got the bright idea to ask online if there were any good "adult" novels of that sort. I was recommended Revelation Space by Alestair Reynolds. It's hard dark sci-fi, and wow was I blown away! I had to write after that.
Wow, you have so many novels lined up! And just look at the covers, incredible art! I was never one for darker tropes, but I did dip my toes in the matter just to try it out, and of the very few I've read, I did have some fun reading them, but I'll stay in my comfy Slice of Lifes for now, haha! DrakanMelt

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#68

Little Wrote:
LashBrown Wrote: I'm interested in the community's thoughts on this, was it even a book that inspired you? A Light Novel? 
What was the moment you just sat down one day and said "I'm doing this!"
Lord of the Rings. I think I was just so in awe of the world that I wanted to create a world similarly epic (well... failing epic-ly so far).
Ah, a classic! The world JRR Tolkien wrote is so intricate and complex that it was honestly worrying me about my own Novel! But when I got to writing, I realized that that feeling of dread was nothing to be scared of, in all actuality. Writing has been fun from the start, and before I realized it, I already had a pretty good idea of the world I want my characters to live and interact in!

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#69


Crusixblade Wrote: DrakanSmug Hank the Cowdog. I was like 9 or something and I went "Wow, I like books. I want to make them." !

Wow, you really had your interests set in stone from the beginning, mad props for being interested in reading at such a young age!
I myself only got interested in reading about 2 years ago, which would make me about 15 at the time, I always considered my local literature to be extremely boring, but then I was introduced to foreign (i.e. English, Japanese) literature and I was blown away at just how better it is!

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#70
It wasn't just one book.  I started scribbling down stories when I was little, at first for a school project.  It was bad.  I mean it stank on ice.  Awful.  But I kept reading, and occasionally scribbling down story ideas.  I had a phase in my teens where I wrote angsty teen poetry, too- won a contest, ended up editing a magazine for a while after that.  Fun times.

I'm an old fart, though.  Back in the nineties, before Amazon, ebooks, when the internet was taking its first wobbly steps into the world, if you wanted new books you went to the library or the bookstore.  I did that.  Some of them were awesome.  

And some of them were bad.  Not, oh my dog what is this crap!?  But there were a lot of dull, boring stories.  That was not a good time to be a reader.  Publishing houses put out only so many books a year.  And of those books, only a few were sci-fi and fantasy- the genres I read at the time.

I re-read a lot.  Wore the spines out of a few, even being careful.

I started writing again last year.  Two decades since I finished anything.  So far, so good.  Dr. Z's Zombie Apocalypse steals draws inspiration and ideas from John Ringo's Black Tide Rising series.  It started out as a writing exercise that someone asked me "what happens next?"

Thirty-six (and counting) chapters later...

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#71

Dan Wrote: It wasn't just one book.  I started scribbling down stories when I was little, at first for a school project.  It was bad.  I mean it stank on ice.  Awful.  But I kept reading, and occasionally scribbling down story ideas.  I had a phase in my teens where I wrote angsty teen poetry, too- won a contest, ended up editing a magazine for a while after that.  Fun times.

I'm an old fart, though.  Back in the nineties, before Amazon, ebooks, when the internet was taking its first wobbly steps into the world, if you wanted new books you went to the library or the bookstore.  I did that.  Some of them were awesome.  

And some of them were bad.  Not, oh my dog what is this crap!?  But there were a lot of dull, boring stories.  That was not a good time to be a reader.  Publishing houses put out only so many books a year.  And of those books, only a few were sci-fi and fantasy- the genres I read at the time.

I re-read a lot.  Wore the spines out of a few, even being careful.

I started writing again last year.  Two decades since I finished anything.  So far, so good.  Dr. Z's Zombie Apocalypse steals draws inspiration and ideas from John Ringo's Black Tide Rising series.  It started out as a writing exercise that someone asked me "what happens next?"

Thirty-six (and counting) chapters later...
Wow, I've seen Dr. Z's all around RR! It's incredible to hear the history behind it, your writing always seemed so professional!

Here's a question, since I looked everywhere but no one gave a straight answer: How does a publishing house and the process of finding editors work?

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#72
I guess the books that showed me what i wanted to write were by J.C. Hines: Goblin Hero, Goblin Quest and Goblin War.
Iron Teeth, on this site, is also a good contender.

At some point I was really, really into monster MCs, and I got frustrated to hell and back. I didn't want a bloodthirsty kill-and-destroy monster. I didn't want a human-monster that's all buddy-buddy and inclusive. I wanted a monster MC that was obviously different, but still relatable. It shouldn't have the same preferences, morals or way of thinking as humans, but it should have similar instincts to that of all living things, things we 'animals' can understand. This was after the hey-day of 'transported to another world' novels and people started getting a bit more creative and have people get there in various forms, shapes, and species. The monsters, even when not a reborn human, usually fell into two broad categories. First the battle maniacs who have no sense of self-preservation and just want to fight and grow stronger. Then come the 'I may look like this, but I'm still human' monsters. Neither felt like what a monster, living its life, would actually be like.

Let's take Hines' books. The main character is a goblin, Jig.
Goblin MCs in most novels behave entirely un-goblin like. They seek out confrontation, proof their strength, gain control of their tribe, organize them and found an empire! Not Jig. Well, he does that too, but he does it like a goblin, not like a human. He does it by being a sneaky, treacherous, weak, coward. He doesn't do anything unless it will benefit himself (or his pet spider), doesn't plan too far ahead and stays true to his own moral code. Which means anything goes as long as he's fairly sure he'll survive (coward, remember?).

Lastly, I got really, really fed up with how fast all those characters went from zero to hero. Be it with cheats, lucky power-ups or previously unknown synergies (oh gods the stupidity of some of those).

I wanted to write that kind of story, like Jig's. About an actual monster, not even close to humanoid in my case. A moral compass is non-existent, compassion has no place in the wilderness. With strong self-preservation instincts and some sense of 'consequences'. As in 'don't poke a hornets nest, there are more of them than you can see'. A weak monster for a long time, because that makes for more possible problems to overcome. A monster that lives 'might makes right' and will strive for that might. Yet it has no human ambitions, no desires for conquest or domination. It does have very relatable 'animal' ambitions. Food, sleep, safety. Freedom? An animal will look for freedom when they don't feel safe, there is no 'for the principle of it'. Principles can join compassion in the trash. It has no compunctions about killing. And yet it won't kill without reason. Being told to by someone powerful is a good reason. Food is another one. Self-defense, naturally, or to secure a place to rest. Entertainment? Life is 'entertaining' enough already and there are many things that are entertaining and less dangerous.

Anyway, that's how I started

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#73
LashBrown Wrote: Wow, I've seen Dr. Z's all around RR! It's incredible to hear the history behind it, your writing always seemed so professional!

Here's a question, since I looked everywhere but no one gave a straight answer: How does a publishing house and the process of finding editors work?
Appreciate the compliment. I've still got a ways to go on polishing up the rough edges, I think, but my aim is to entertain people. As long as the readers are having fun with the story, that's the goal.

At a guess, you're asking how to submit to a publisher? Well, that's a bit of a long one. It's been a while since I sent a proposal in.

To make it short though, used to be you hired an agent and they pitched your book to publishing houses. Don't do that. That model is, if not dead, its on life support and they're calling in the family. Just don't hire an agent. Waste of time and money.

If you are dead set on getting pub'd by one of the big houses, first off you have to know *where* to submit. Know their brand. Don't pitch a high fantasy to a house that makes its name on Regency romance. Or a horror novel to a place that is known for space opera and sci fi. If your work doesn't fit their model nobody is even going to look at it.

You'll want your manuscript to be tight and clean, well formatted. If the house has a slush pile, there may well be a healthy amount of luck required to get noticed. If you can bring an audience with you (viz Larry Correia), you might actually get contacted by someone connected to the publisher themselves.

Once you've got that, you need to be able to distill your novel down to an elevator pitch. Explain your book in under twenty seconds. "It's Matrix meets Pokemon," juxtaposing two already successful enterprises is common. Then have the short synopsis ready. This isn't the blurb, this is the couple of paragraph summary. These two things are there to get the person you're submitting to interested.

Maybe add a short bio- this is where you put on the metaphorical short skirt and hooker boots. Sell yourself, make it look like you're not a basement dwelling NEET, which may or may not be a tough sell for you, depending.

Then you need to convince the gal- it's usually a gal, I think- that your book will SELL. Publishers want to make money. So do you. Do your market research. Do you have a target audience in mind? Social media presence? Existing followers that *will* buy your book that you can bring to the publisher?

And if you manage to clear THAT hurdle, you need to provide a ready synopsis and sample chapters. Back in the day, you'd send a manuscript in a SASE to the publishing house and sit at home and await your pretty pink rejection slip. I used to know of a guy that wallpapered a room with those.

Just make sure you follow the submission guidelines precisely when you send in your proposal. It won't even get looked at if you don't.

As for editors, my contacts in that field are all old and out of date or retired these days. Or dead, some of them. That I couldn't direct you very well, but I'm sure there are resources around for those of a mind to search them out.

My humble advice would be to try your hand at self publishing. To do that, all the responsibility for marketing, editing, formatting, and the rest is on you- but you keep your rights and the profit as well. Kindle Vela is an interesting things that just popped up. Episodic storytelling, like some do here on Royal Road. Restrictive contract though, you can't have the story published anywhere else before you start on Vela. But you can take it from Vela to KU once the story is finished, I believe.

You could try Patreon as well, but be aware- Patreon has gotten a tad political from what I hear. If you have a history anywhere on the net of saying naughty things, you could find your Patreon going away. If you're apolitical, no big deal though.

Good luck, and write often.

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#74

Oskatat Wrote: I guess the books that showed me what i wanted to write were by J.C. Hines: Goblin Hero, Goblin Quest and Goblin War.
Iron Teeth, on this site, is also a good contender.

At some point I was really, really into monster MCs, and I got frustrated to hell and back. I didn't want a bloodthirsty kill-and-destroy monster. I didn't want a human-monster that's all buddy-buddy and inclusive. I wanted a monster MC that was obviously different, but still relatable. It shouldn't have the same preferences, morals or way of thinking as humans, but it should have similar instincts to that of all living things, things we 'animals' can understand. This was after the hey-day of 'transported to another world' novels and people started getting a bit more creative and have people get there in various forms, shapes, and species. The monsters, even when not a reborn human, usually fell into two broad categories. First the battle maniacs who have no sense of self-preservation and just want to fight and grow stronger. Then come the 'I may look like this, but I'm still human' monsters. Neither felt like what a monster, living its life, would actually be like.

Let's take Hines' books. The main character is a goblin, Jig.
Goblin MCs in most novels behave entirely un-goblin like. They seek out confrontation, proof their strength, gain control of their tribe, organize them and found an empire! Not Jig. Well, he does that too, but he does it like a goblin, not like a human. He does it by being a sneaky, treacherous, weak, coward. He doesn't do anything unless it will benefit himself (or his pet spider), doesn't plan too far ahead and stays true to his own moral code. Which means anything goes as long as he's fairly sure he'll survive (coward, remember?).

Lastly, I got really, really fed up with how fast all those characters went from zero to hero. Be it with cheats, lucky power-ups or previously unknown synergies (oh gods the stupidity of some of those).

I wanted to write that kind of story, like Jig's. About an actual monster, not even close to humanoid in my case. A moral compass is non-existent, compassion has no place in the wilderness. With strong self-preservation instincts and some sense of 'consequences'. As in 'don't poke a hornets nest, there are more of them than you can see'. A weak monster for a long time, because that makes for more possible problems to overcome. A monster that lives 'might makes right' and will strive for that might. Yet it has no human ambitions, no desires for conquest or domination. It does have very relatable 'animal' ambitions. Food, sleep, safety. Freedom? An animal will look for freedom when they don't feel safe, there is no 'for the principle of it'. Principles can join compassion in the trash. It has no compunctions about killing. And yet it won't kill without reason. Being told to by someone powerful is a good reason. Food is another one. Self-defense, naturally, or to secure a place to rest. Entertainment? Life is 'entertaining' enough already and there are many things that are entertaining and less dangerous.

Anyway, that's how I started
My God, how have I never seen a 'Monster MC' book?! It sounds so interesting! I've heard of 'That Time I Reincarnated As A Slime' and it was a blast, but a goblin? Never!

A coward MC who wants to live and not to do anything beyond that at first sounds boring, but when you put it that way it's so much more intricate than that!
Thank you so much for sharing your thoughts and opinions on the matter, I'm definitely gonna check these stories out!

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#75

Dan Wrote:
LashBrown Wrote: Wow, I've seen Dr. Z's all around RR! It's incredible to hear the history behind it, your writing always seemed so professional!

Here's a question, since I looked everywhere but no one gave a straight answer: How does a publishing house and the process of finding editors work?
Appreciate the compliment.  I've still got a ways to go on polishing up the rough edges, I think, but my aim is to entertain people.  As long as the readers are having fun with the story, that's the goal.

At a guess, you're asking how to submit to a publisher?  Well, that's a bit of a long one.  It's been a while since I sent a proposal in.

To make it short though, used to be you hired an agent and they pitched your book to publishing houses.  Don't do that.  That model is, if not dead, its on life support and they're calling in the family.  Just don't hire an agent.  Waste of time and money.

If you are dead set on getting pub'd by one of the big houses, first off you have to know *where* to submit.  Know their brand.  Don't pitch a high fantasy to a house that makes its name on Regency romance.  Or a horror novel to a place that is known for space opera and sci fi.  If your work doesn't fit their model nobody is even going to look at it

You'll want your manuscript to be tight and clean, well formatted.  If the house has a slush pile, there may well be a healthy amount of luck required to get noticed.  If you can bring an audience with you (viz Larry Correia), you might actually get contacted by someone connected to the publisher themselves.

Once you've got that, you need to be able to distill your novel down to an elevator pitch.  Explain your book in under twenty seconds.  "It's Matrix meets Pokemon," juxtaposing two already successful enterprises is common.  Then have the short synopsis ready.  This isn't the blurb, this is the couple of paragraph summary.  These two things are there to get the person you're submitting to interested.

Maybe add a short bio- this is where you put on the metaphorical short skirt and hooker boots.  Sell yourself, make it look like you're not a basement dwelling NEET, which may or may not be a tough sell for you, depending.

Then you need to convince the gal- it's usually a gal, I think- that your book will SELL.  Publishers want to make money.  So do you.  Do your market research.  Do you have a target audience in mind?  Social media presence?  Existing followers that *will* buy your book that you can bring to the publisher?

And if you manage to clear THAT hurdle, you need to provide a ready synopsis and sample chapters.  Back in the day, you'd send a manuscript in a SASE to the publishing house and sit at home and await your pretty pink rejection slip.  I used to know of a guy that wallpapered a room with those.

Just make sure you follow the submission guidelines precisely when you send in your proposal.  It won't even get looked at if you don't. 

As for editors, my contacts in that field are all old and out of date or retired these days.  Or dead, some of them.  That I couldn't direct you very well, but I'm sure there are resources around for those of a mind to search them out.

My humble advice would be to try your hand at self publishing.  To do that, all the responsibility for marketing, editing, formatting, and the rest is on you- but you keep your rights and the profit as well.  Kindle Vela is an interesting things that just popped up.  Episodic storytelling, like some do here on Royal Road.  Restrictive contract though, you can't have the story published anywhere else before you start on Vela.  But you can take it from Vela to KU once the story is finished, I believe.

You could try Patreon as well, but be aware- Patreon has gotten a tad political from what I hear.  If you have a history anywhere on the net of saying naughty things, you could find your Patreon going away.  If you're apolitical, no big deal though.

Good luck, and write often.
This is everything I could've asked for and more! Thank you so much, you have no idea how much I scoured every goddamned nook and cranny of the Internet, asked all sorts of friends who knew of a guy that knew a guy, and NONE OF THEM told me anything!

This is very nicely explained, and the sort of road map I have in front of me is a lot clearer now! I appreciate your advice as well, I do have a Patreon, and I'll look into maybe posting some early chapter drafts and some bonus material there as well. Self publishing is something I keep hearing about day in day out, but it's either 'Your best bet' or 'Avoid at all costs' leaving me torn on which one to go with.

It's still WAAAAY too early for me to be thinking about looking for a publisher, but when the time comes a couple months down the line, I'd at least like to have some sort of guideline. Judging by how you explained the whole process, it really does remind me of job interviews, haha!

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#76
I think for me it was a mix of books, especially 'fairy tale' stuff, and video games and movies. But for sure books and video games in a general sense. I honestly couldn't point at one particular thing, mostly because I started being interested in it when I was a little kid. Animation was another big one though when it came to movies/shows. I was a fan of shows like Digimon early on, and I always found it really neat how hard Digimon's first run leans into being extremely weird and surreal while also doing some pretty neat things in terms of character exploration and darker themes.

Re: What was the Book that made you think "I wanna write too"?

#77

Scribble Wrote: I think for me it was a mix of books, especially 'fairy tale' stuff, and video games and movies. But for sure books and video games in a general sense. I honestly couldn't point at one particular thing, mostly because I started being interested in it when I was a little kid. Animation was another big one though when it came to movies/shows. I was a fan of shows like Digimon early on, and I always found it really neat how hard Digimon's first run leans into being extremely weird and surreal while also doing some pretty neat things in terms of character exploration and darker themes.
I was always a Pokemon kind of guy myself, only having watched a few random episodes of Digimon as opposed to full on binging the Pokemon series.


It's not that I didn't enjoy Digimon, it's more so just the fact that kid me preferred the shows on channel 8 as opposed to channel 41 if you catch my drift.