Wizard Slurs.

#1
Based...heavily on a different topic seperated out into this thread to be more fun.

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So swearing! It's an inherent part of a lot of society but for some reason, we like sanitizing all our media to pretend normal people don't swear constantly. Part of that swearing is the standard stuff that means someone was surprised or hurt themselves but the more biting parts are any swearing meant as a insult. 

Now in interest of not getting political that insult form of swearing could have connotations against certain groups. Words could have used to be politically correct and now arn't. All sorts of debatable topics we should stay far away from in this completely safe thread.

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Picture a fantasy world. We have a certain minority group - lets call them wizards. There are less of them and they are different and thus deserving of villager A's scorn. There's an adventurer party and they have a mage in the group. Mages are basically just witches am I right?

I rambled my setup way too much but what are good derogatory terms to refer to magical people of the wizard/witch/mage/sorcerer variety?

I feel like wizard slurs peaked at harry potters "mudbloods" in terms of words that sound like they are really bad despite being completely made up. Witch sounds an awful lot like another term but how do you insult a wizard? or insult someone by implying they are a wizard? 

Tower dweller might work. Makes em sound like shut in's. Anyone else have any ideas?  DrakanFascinating

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#2
Hm... "witch" or "warlock" have some negative connotation to them. Thus, it is already used as a slur.  
"Mudbloods" had a meaning somewhat similar to mixed-race, but using a dirty description of "mud".
So the concept is not directly related to mage class at all, but it was used in fiction on the mage+non mage mix.
Probably you may made up some new derogatory terms combining description objects and use in fiction as a mage class term.
like for example:

Tumorric 
Yellow as turmeric and describe it as solid mass of abnormal tissues.
This term can be used to insult a mage that has some special power that might not be pleasant.
There's a racist element in it though, i'm just giving an example.

How do you brainstorm some really offensive new term.
First, reflect on ourselves, what are our deepest fear and anger?
What can trigger us the most?
That word, mix it up together, you'll have the term.

Tumor - it is cancerous
Turmeric - yellow as the skin color of an Asian, which is in my own skin.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#3
There's definitely quite a bit depending upon whatever fictional society is created. If certain species are more likely to have magic powers (elves?) then derogatory terms can have roots in that.

If any events have happened/mages were responsible for some catastrophe, insults can have roots in that. (calling them breakers or jinxes because they blew up a country or something).

and of course it can be dependant upon different types of powers with particularly unpleasant sounding ones having more negative connotations and being more likely to have specialized slurs surrounding them. (necromancers having relations with corpses or whatever)

...think I specifically tried to make this thread as vague as possible to get more varied responses and potential insults and not make it sound like I was doing market research for a specific story.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#4
Alright, let's see what the ol' brain can come up with off the top of my head.

Wizard
Mad Hatter, Jibberling, Book Dust, Shut in, Virgin, Book Worm, Kindling/Kinnel, Stick shaker, Sparkly/sparklies, Scroll stuffer, Wigglefingers, Manawhores, Magicunts, Wicks

Druid
Unwashed, Zoophile, Hippie, Civ-walker, Shroom Head, Beast

Priest
God botherer, Chanter

I feel like there's more really obvious ones I'm missing maybe I'll post again later when I come up with more.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#5

Gasmaskbro Wrote: Wigglefingers


This has me giggling. Favourite one you came up with hands down even if it doesn't seem like it actually works as a slur.

Like I can't see it being used in a story seriously with a little wizard kid running off and crying about being called it or a group of villagers talking in hushed tones about old wigglefingers up on the hill...It seems more like a term of endearment an adventuring party calls their designated spell slinger.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#7

Gasmaskbro Wrote: God botherer


I didn't even think of the possibilities based on a world where clerics and paladins have a direct line to their gods.

Similar ones based on the snitch line of reasoning.

"Sin Nark" / "Sin tattler" "Sin-Snitcher..Sin-itcher..."

trying to get gold diggers related to an afterlife or sugar daddy.

"Faith Miner" / "Afterlife Exploiter" / "Godly Mistriss" / "Divine escort"


Re: Wizard Slurs.

#8
Twitch - A caster (commonly witches) who heavily relies on hand movements for spells when most just point or use a wand.

Limp Wand - A caster (commonly wizards) who relies on wands and cannot use magic without a focus.

Small Hat - A stupid spellcaster, insinuating they have a small brain.

Book Worm - A caster who relies on a book to cast their spells rather than remembering the incantations. 

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#9
Okay, your party rolls into town. 

The villagers vaguely tolerate your typical adventurers weirdos, but then one spots the pointy hat on the wizard. 

VillagerA isn’t crazy enough to shout anything at that fire-ball-flinging freak but he does lean over to his mate, VillagerB, and mutters, “get a load of the Mys-Tick.” 

For you see, they are parasites, ticks, selfishly leeching far more than their fair share of energy from the world to only better themselves. This is why the common man feels more tired every day, less energy to go around. This is why the harvest fails when a mys-tick is near, they sap the soil with their presence. Mys-ticks are ticks on the pelt of the world… and once he is gone, noone will miss that tick.

Some wizards may be trying to ‘reclaim’ the word. Proudly labeling themselves as ‘Mystics’. Just one more example of them trying to take what was never theirs.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#11
If wizards were real, they would have real wizard power, and all that entails. Therefore any insult to a wizard or all wizards would have to come either from beings that can shrug off any retaliation that wizards could inflict and thus would be a dismissive term like the aforementioned 'wagglefingers', or if from those that couldn't stand up against a wizard it would be a term that sounds good if overheard by a wizard but is actually insulting.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#12

Rusty Wrote: If wizards were real, they would have real wizard power, and all that entails. Therefore any insult to a wizard or all wizards would have to come either from beings that can shrug off any retaliation that wizards could inflict and thus would be a dismissive term like the aforementioned 'wagglefingers', or if from those that couldn't stand up against a wizard it would be a term that sounds good if overheard by a wizard but is actually insulting.


Assuming wizards are homicidal enough to lightning bolt every peasant that calls them a rude sounding term that still leaves anything whispered in passing.

I really really don't want to relate this thread to "real terms" much but that's like saying crackers isn't a term used for white people linking them to slavery. If a world with wizards lives in fear of those wizards...it just means any insults are said under breath or long after a wizard leaves where villager A is certain they won't be turned into a frog.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#15

vertpert Wrote: In my opinion, slurs really don't have any meaning behind them unless they have history.


That's a fair point but in terms of a story it just means you have to write a fake history for your fake slur.

The problem with basing stuff in reality and real history is you run the risk of offending the group whatever slur you are using refers to. Even if you are trying to base a character around it, even if the character using said slur is the hecking "villain" there's a chance of readers taking it like the author is the one endorsing whatever viewpoint is being expressed. 
Even in general swearing is shy'ed away from because on one side you have people who are offended by swear words and on the other side you have people who don't care. There are basically no readers that will be offended you haven't included swear words even if they would prefer them so it's much safer to just not.

Because of this "problem" 99% of authors make sure to completely shy away from any potentially offensive language. It's safer, it's more marketable. They sanitize dialogue to the point of it feeling...well unrealistic in my opinion. If you've been on the internet/read comment sections on social media/remember how actual kids talked around the schoolyard all those years ago/have worked in or around construction/live in reality you know how people talk. 

If you are reading or writing fantasy you also know you don't need to use terms that are offensive "in real life". Storming, Rusting, Rust and Ruin. Brandon Sanderson doesn't tend to swear but his worlds feel more alive because the dialogue has "fake swears".

Similarly not using fake slurs/swear words/insults can result in really stupid sounding banter and fight scenes. 

I guess wrapping about around to giving your fake slur meaning and history. Of the responses in this thread the Mys-Tick one above is probably my favourite because you can almost imagine a whole world based on that insult. Either its based in "reality" and the magic system so wizards actually do suck energy out of things to cast magic (another option is mana can neither be created nor destroyed magic spells use all the environmental mana in the area converting it into a spell and crops suffer the lack of mana...) or its just a superstition stemming from jealousy. Either work and I'd love to read a story that includes something like that. if crows ever writes that would I'd love to read it.

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#16

Bluelightning42 Wrote: I guess wrapping about around to giving your fake slur meaning and history. Of the responses in this thread the Mys-Tick one above is probably my favourite because you can almost imagine a whole world based on that insult. Either its based in "reality" and the magic system so wizards actually do suck energy out of things to cast magic (another option is mana can neither be created nor destroyed magic spells use all the environmental mana in the area converting it into a spell and crops suffer the lack of mana...) or its just a superstition stemming from jealousy. Either work and I'd love to read a story that includes something like that. if crows ever writes that would I'd love to read it.


Fun fact, I just had a shower thought that iterated on the concept. One minor change... "Missed-Tick". It makes a small but crucial distinction... all wizards are ticks on the world, but not all of those ticks are discovered and 'rooted out' while they are young. Some are missed for long enough that they grow too powerful to be properly taken down. The missed ticks. Have fun with the implication this slur must exist in a world where young children suspected of magic aptitude are hunted down. Just for good measure. xD
(Okay, okay... I guess they don't have to be killed when caught, maybe they just get their magic circuits removed or something.)

 I don't have any intention at the moment of writing fantasy but if I do, I'll let you know. xD

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#17
I wrote a fantasy story years ago where magic users were considered weak. Not weak as in "magic is weak", but weak because they had to rely on magic to do things they couldn't without.

Because of this, other characters in the story would make fun of anyone who even thought about using magic. There weren't any particular slurs, but it was likened to things like erectile dysfunction and feeblemindedness.

I.agine studying magic for years only to have people call you a limp d**k as you walk down the street. :O

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#18
I agree with what some other people have said about how a slur really only gains meaning with history behind it. And that as wizards are usually strong and supernatural, people would be too scared to really insult them outwardly. I mean not every peasant would fear being struck down but when you see a soldier in camo with a gun do you go "goddamn filthy leafbodies."  So for this too work I think wizards would need to be largely weaker than other classes or have some bad stereotypes at least. 

Man this is hard I'm kind of just thinking of things that you could call a wizard but aren't really wizard exclusive.

Bean pole, Mana touched, weak kneed, mana thief, old pervert, grey beard, knowledge hoarder, seersucker (that's like a fabric or something), mana cursed, sorcerous swindler, tingle brained, pointless thinker, fae f***er, fated coward (I like this one), pointy hat prick, charlatan, ma-na'er-do-well (really proud of this one). 

Alright I think I'm tapped out, through sheer quantity over quality I think some of those turned out pretty well. 

Re: Wizard Slurs.

#20

CrowsCrowCrow Wrote: Okay, your party rolls into town. 

The villagers vaguely tolerate your typical adventurers weirdos, but then one spots the pointy hat on the wizard. 

VillagerA isn’t crazy enough to shout anything at that fire-ball-flinging freak but he does lean over to his mate, VillagerB, and mutters, “get a load of the Mys-Tick.” 

For you see, they are parasites, ticks, selfishly leeching far more than their fair share of energy from the world to only better themselves. This is why the common man feels more tired every day, less energy to go around. This is why the harvest fails when a mys-tick is near, they sap the soil with their presence. Mys-ticks are ticks on the pelt of the world… and once he is gone, noone will miss that tick.

Some wizards may be trying to ‘reclaim’ the word. Proudly labeling themselves as ‘Mystics’. Just one more example of them trying to take what was never theirs.


I like this, but feel it needs to go one or two steps further. Like, Mys-Tick might be the original term, but over time it would mutate - people would immediately drop the "mys", then it would be tick, tickets - go down the "tick" route and you'd end up with insinuations about blood-sucking and leeching, so originally it could have been mys-tick, then it becomes leech.

Or tick goes with tock, and people making references to clocks becomes a dog whistle that you're talking about wizards.