Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#23

Space Wrote: If the characters want to drive the story forward they betta start writing it !

Oh, my word, YES, PLEASE. Then they'll stop pestering me about new ideas when I'm not even done with my OLD idea yet! And. I. Must. Finish.

Quote:Jerry Beans Man

Space Wrote:
Rhea Wrote: I just enjoy writing and letting the characters drive the story forward.


If the characters want to drive the story forward they betta start writing it !
They are lazy and just tell you what to write.  peogentleman

peoYes But then this...

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Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#24
I typically write down outlines, like bullet points of the events that should happen, and how they will impact the characters. 

Then my chapters multiply when I'm not looking, and whenever I try to delete them, I realise that I can't because they contain good character development or worldbuilding (how it got there is a mystery, I sure as hell didn't write it).

So yes, I'm a panster  peocool

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#26

AuthorMarcel Wrote: There are pros and cons to either type of writer, but which one are you?
I'm an outliner by nature, but I've come to understand that I'm actually the opposite. When I'm in a relaxed writing state without stress, I don't outline. Sometimes I outline if the story requires it, but I'm very much a pantser as many like to call it. I don't rewrite and edit. I just do a proof read when I'm done.

 DrakanGlasses

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#27
A mix of both. 

I plot, but my plots are kind of like creating a skeleton. If I see a human skull, I can make some guesses as to what that person looked like, but I wouldn't be able to pick them out of a crowd just based on that, yeah? Plotting stories is like that. I can maybe tell if this skeleton has light or heavy features, is short or tall, and how their past injuries have healed (or not healed), if they still have all their teeth, of they died from (or lived with) obvious trauma, ect. By looking at a skeleton, I can make some uneducated but logical guesses about the life of the person who once haunted their bones. 

Plotting is like that to me, making the skeleton. But, it's in the writing that I put actual flesh and skin on those bones, find out how that story likes to wear its hair, that this one really likes to wear plaid shirts, or what its eye color is, you know what I mean? When I step back and look at the story when I'm done with it? There are always things that surprise me, and those little surprises are what makes it interesting. 

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#30
I plot out the key beats. Everything in between the core scenes is improvised. To use an age old saying, I put myself in the characters shoes, and then I decide how they'd act in between those core scenes. 

Example from Volskar: 

GOAL of chapter:
Take characters from point A (campsite) and have them arrive at point B (Sparring grounds). Once characters arrive at point B then they will encounter New Character (Canyon) and watch him spar. He will show off a unique talent that amazes the MCs. 

Improvised Portion:
All of the conversations/micro-scenes during the character's travel is improvised. In this particular situation, I thought "What sort of activity could occupy their hands/attention while walking?" I decided to have one of the characters stop at a market stall to buy her favorite snack. She shares it with the MC. It gives them a talking point and allowed the opportunity to describe their reactions to the food. This small talking point expands into a more relaxed conversation about more serious topics. 

They end up arriving at the sparring grounds and things progress as initially planned. 

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#31

Space Wrote: I'm starting a new story. 
Planned the whole thing and packed it into 12 chapters. 
I'm 20 chapters in and I haven't passed the second chapter originally planned, adding details, characters, references, etc.

I am a planstter

And regarding Stephen King, it's hard to plan anything under the infuence of MOUNTAINS of coke.
Ha ha! If I'm not mistaken, I think he wrote Carrie under that influence. 

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#33
TLDR; it shifts based on the context and the draft.

It depends on the project. When it comes to long fiction like novels or long novellas, I'm usually more of a plotter. I allow myself to get pantsed by interesting new ideas along the way, but I do start from a place of structure.

When it comes to short fiction (or the interconnected arcs of my Trials, see below), I'm a pantser. I don't have a plan. Sometimes I have a theme (honor), or an overtone (arctic) or a specific scene in mind (a samurai duel on a bridge; a drug-haze with demons; fighting dire wolves at the edge of the world on a frozen lake that's collapsing like breaking bones), but I don't let that rule the plot in any way. I'm typically surprised, and intrigued, though not always delighted. I think the Trials stories are some of my best work ever because I'm eager to find out the ending, hopefully like a reader would be, rather than slowly revealing my hand as I would with long form fiction.

My second draft of short fiction becomes more of a plotter scenario, where now I have the plot frame I want and I begin to work towards tightening it down, improving language to support the plot, etc.

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#34
Plotter!
I usually get the premise and the ending of the story, a few cool scenes and random (but plot-relevant) conversations between my characters. From experience, I have to do the hard work and be able to write down, at least a summary, of all of the things that are going to happen in between those things or I'll get lost in a 20k "act one", lose steam, and abandon the project. 
On the other hand, I can't do the crazy detailed outlines I see some people doing - if I do that I lose all motivation to write the story because you might as well just read my outline and use your imagination. 

I do usually revise my outlines as I write and discover cool things about my story, and sometimes make important changes that can have significant impacts - though adding those things into the prose is a job for editing.

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#36
I reckon there is 'instinctive style' and 'productive style'. Instinctively, I just make things up as I go along and everything is very wobbly. That was great fun, and a awesome recipe for a story that went nowhere and angered me. 

The thing that helped me actually FINISH my first book was forcing myself to plot. Not minutely, but I'd at least map purposes for each scene. Like "MC is in a new town and needs to be freaked out by their local customs". But I'd leave the actual details of the customs and stuff until I wrote the scene, and made it up on the spot. 

There is nothing like actually writing and trialing different methods to help discover what works for you!

Re: When It Comes Time To Writing Your Story Are You A Panster Or A Plotter?

#39
I had to look this up since I'd never heard of these concepts before reading this thread. I'm apparently a plantser (a combination of both).

I don't outline in advance and I don't think I ever could. My version of outlining is more during or after the fact so I can easily go back and remember what's in each chapter.

I know the general plot of the story. What the goals are, and what the steps are to reach those goals, and that's about it. I also make sure I have a good understanding of the world and the history of evens that led up to the current plot I'm writing. It's not that I need to tell the reader all of those details, I just need to know them so I don't contradict myself as things are naturally revealed as the story progresses. I also make sure I know my characters and how they would react to things, again, so I don't contradict myself or have characters do things for the sake of plot instead of based on their personalities.

 After I get those elements down, I just start writing and let my characters figure out how they're going to do things. This can be frustrating since I'm constantly negotiating with my characters to get them from point A to point B and many times I have to do things differently than I initially thought I would because of that, but I'd rather my characters do things that make sense than just act in a way convenient to some arbitrary plot point. I spend a lot of time running everything I know about the world and my characters through my head trying to figure out how to accomplish something based on the "box" I've put myself in, but I think that makes for more creative story telling. 

It's by no means a perfect way to right and I'm constantly trying to do better about planning further ahead, but plotting and outlining are not things that come natural to me so I know I'll never fully plot out a book before writing.