Re: Hard Sci-fi

#2
You can check out my ongoing series, The Nightcore Trilogy - Spacefall.  It starts out on a space station above Earth while an apocalypse begins on the planet.  It is world-building of a different sort, where the rules are all changing.  It starts out hard sci-fi but blends in more and more fantasy as it goes.  Think of a mix of the Resident Evil movies meets Shadowrun in which all of the ancient religions are true.  Then mix in some anime/manga elements.

I've also read a series called A Sinner's Eden by Andur that is hard sci-fi as well.  This one starts with a man who gets injected with nanites that change his genetic code based on what kinds of meat he consumes.  He's sent to another planet through a one-way portal with other prisoners.  This new planet is teeming with monsters, dangerous plants, animals, and other "humans" who have evolved into numerous different "species" thanks to their nanites.  Despite the harsh environment, the hardiest of humans have managed to survive and have even built well-protected cities in this new world.  It's a fun read and long and the author keeps even the most fantastical elements grounded with scientific explanations.

Re: Hard Sci-fi

#4

Paradoxcloud Wrote: The bobiverse series is alright, not on rr though.
Correction, the first three Bobiverse books are alright.


I do also quiet enjoy a Canticle for Leibowitz. It's an old story but its is still a fascinating read of a post apocalypse society with none of the modern tropes.

Re: Hard Sci-fi

#5

Daniel Wrote: You can check out my ongoing series, The Nightcore Trilogy - Spacefall.  It starts out on a space station above Earth while an apocalypse begins on the planet.  It is world-building of a different sort, where the rules are all changing.  It starts out hard sci-fi but blends in more and more fantasy as it goes.  Think of a mix of the Resident Evil movies meets Shadowrun in which all of the ancient religions are true.  Then mix in some anime/manga elements.

I've also read a series called A Sinner's Eden by Andur that is hard sci-fi as well.  This one starts with a man who gets injected with nanites that change his genetic code based on what kinds of meat he consumes.  He's sent to another planet through a one-way portal with other prisoners.  This new planet is teeming with monsters, dangerous plants, animals, and other "humans" who have evolved into numerous different "species" thanks to their nanites.  Despite the harsh environment, the hardiest of humans have managed to survive and have even built well-protected cities in this new world.  It's a fun read and long and the author keeps even the most fantastical elements grounded with scientific explanations.


Thanks :)

Re: Hard Sci-fi

#6
A few recommendations, all on RR.  All hard-sci, with caveats noted below.
  • Burning Stars, Falling Skies
  • Fantasy World Epsilon 30-10 *hard sci-fi, but the expressed effects of some alternate physics is fantastical
  • Post Human
  • Grand Design
  • Song of the Void *there are psions, but otherwise it's a hard space opera
  • Kitty Cat Kill Sat
  • Quod Olim Erat *caveat here is that it's an excellent premise, and lots of folks like it, but it falls a bit short in execution for me, so not a personal recommendation
Let me know if you want recommendations for non-Royal Road.

Re: Hard Sci-fi

#7

Daniel Wrote: I've also read a series called A Sinner's Eden by Andur that is hard sci-fi as well.  This one starts with a man who gets injected with nanites that change his genetic code based on what kinds of meat he consumes.  He's sent to another planet through a one-way portal with other prisoners.  This new planet is teeming with monsters, dangerous plants, animals, and other "humans" who have evolved into numerous different "species" thanks to their nanites.  Despite the harsh environment, the hardiest of humans have managed to survive and have even built well-protected cities in this new world.  It's a fun read and long and the author keeps even the most fantastical elements grounded with scientific explanations.
I'd definitely characterize it as soft sci-fi though.  There's an attempt to explain the fantastical as an application of technology, except that most of what is explained simply seems impossible.