Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#1
I’m sure you’ve seen lists like these before. Lists of words that writers should avoid if they want their writing to be as good as it can be. 
Well, all those other lists are GARBAGE! They’re WORTHLESS! I’ve read every single one, sifted through the contradictory advice, and decided to make my OWN list! One to top them all, and tell writers the TRUTH!!!

So here you go: ten words you should NEVER have in your book.

    1. Antidisestablishmentarianism. 
Look, the only reason you’re going to have this word in your story is because it’s “the longest word in the English language”, right? Well you’d be WRONG. And I’m not even referencing supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, which is a nonsense word. Nope, pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism is a longer real word. It’s so real, Google Docs knew the correct spelling. But if you wanted to get even longer, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is the longest word published in a dictionary. It means scoliosis. And it doubles as a not-really-real word, so it beats out supercalifragilisticexpialidocious in that respect too.

    2. Undulating. 
A surprising number of people use this word. According to Merphy Napier, a highly respected booktuber, it is a bad word. And clearly someone who reviews books on YouTube for a living knows what she’s talking about, so we should all stop using this word. Yes.

    3. Hypochondriac
This is one of those weird words with two meanings. It can either mean “the two regions of the abdomen lying on either side of the epigastric region and above the lumbar regions” or “a person who is often or always worried about his or her own health”. How are readers supposed to know which definition is meant? There is absolutely no way context clues could help us out with this one!!! Best to avoid it completely.

    4. Gelid
No one uses this word in day-to-day conversation. There are dozens of better words in the thesaurus for “icy”, pick literally any of them. I mean, come on people, you don’t have to use every single suggestion Grammarly gives you. If you’re accepting words like this, you need to invest in a human editor. Or, just, learn English better. Sorry. But don’t use this word.

    5. Hexagon
Hexagons, I think we can all agree, are the lamest shapes out there. If you find yourself describing something as “hexagonal”, you need to describe something else. Or else change the thing to have more than six sides. Or less! I don’t care! But don’t make it a, ugh, HeXaGoN…

    6. Jacuzzi
This is a copyrighted word. You should avoid using copyrighted words in your writing. So, like, never use this word at all. Or crockpot or chapstick or kleenex. Only ever use their non-copyrighted descriptor words. Better safe than sorry.

    7. Adios
This word isn’t even English! We’re writing English stories, aren’t we? So we should only ever use English words! Get that French crap out of your webnovel! Keep English pure! What would Shakespeare think if he learned that people writing in “English” a couple hundred years after his death added words from different languages into their writing? Eh?! King Henry IV would be ashamed of you.

    8. Squirm
I don’t like this word. Personally. It… yeah, I’ve never liked this word. Everyone should stop using it. Yep. Thanks.

    9. Brontosaurus 
Look, it’s been proven that the brontosaurus was a fake. If you need to reference a dinosaur in your story, at least reference one that actually existed. Ok? Is a little research too hard? Michael Chrichton did it, and he didn’t even have Wikipedia to help him. Do better, people.

    10. Cilantro
In today’s society, cilantro has a bad rep. There’s a growing group of people who don’t like cilantro. Or, at least there’s a group of people growing more vocal in their hatred of this plant. If you bend to the pressure and say it’s bad, you’ll alienate all your taco-loving readers who like the stuff. And if you dare say that cilantro is good, you risk getting a bunch of comments about how it’s bad. Instead, use the non-controversial word “coriander”. It’s literally the same plant, but you’d be surprised at how many people don’t know that.

And there you have it! Ten words you, as a writer, should NEVER use! After reading it, I’m sure you can see the superiority of this list compared to others, so you never have to click on a similar clickbait-y title ever again.

You’re welcome.

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#2
I agree with every word on this list except one. DrakanGlasses


Mad Wrote: 5. Hexagon


Hmph, I'll have you know hexagons are the most natural shape you'll find in the world, making it one of the most commonplace shapes in the world. Ie, honeycombs.
In fact, I petition that triangles should just be called tierce hexagons and just advocate for everything to be some hexagon variation, idk.

It is also my favourite shape barely overtaking trapeziums. (No, legit)

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#3

Mad Wrote: I’m sure you’ve seen lists like these before. Lists of words that writers should avoid if they want their writing to be as good as it can be. 
Well, all those other lists are GARBAGE! They’re WORTHLESS! I’ve read every single one, sifted through the contradictory advice, and decided to make my OWN list! One to top them all, and tell writers the TRUTH!!!

So here you go: ten words you should NEVER have in your book.

    1. Antidisestablishmentarianism. 
Look, the only reason you’re going to have this word in your story is because it’s “the longest word in the English language”, right? Well you’d be WRONG. And I’m not even referencing supercalifragilisticexpialidocious, which is a nonsense word. Nope, pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism is a longer real word. It’s so real, Google Docs knew the correct spelling. But if you wanted to get even longer, pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanoconiosis is the longest word published in a dictionary. It means scoliosis. And it doubles as a not-really-real word, so it beats out supercalifragilisticexpialidocious in that respect too.

    2. Undulating. 
A surprising number of people use this word. According to Merphy Napier, a highly respected booktuber, it is a bad word. And clearly someone who reviews books on YouTube for a living knows what she’s talking about, so we should all stop using this word. Yes.

    3. Hypochondriac
This is one of those weird words with two meanings. It can either mean “the two regions of the abdomen lying on either side of the epigastric region and above the lumbar regions” or “a person who is often or always worried about his or her own health”. How are readers supposed to know which definition is meant? There is absolutely no way context clues could help us out with this one!!! Best to avoid it completely.

    4. Gelid
No one uses this word in day-to-day conversation. There are dozens of better words in the thesaurus for “icy”, pick literally any of them. I mean, come on people, you don’t have to use every single suggestion Grammarly gives you. If you’re accepting words like this, you need to invest in a human editor. Or, just, learn English better. Sorry. But don’t use this word.

    5. Hexagon
Hexagons, I think we can all agree, are the lamest shapes out there. If you find yourself describing something as “hexagonal”, you need to describe something else. Or else change the thing to have more than six sides. Or less! I don’t care! But don’t make it a, ugh, HeXaGoN…

    6. Jacuzzi
This is a copyrighted word. You should avoid using copyrighted words in your writing. So, like, never use this word at all. Or crockpot or chapstick or kleenex. Only ever use their non-copyrighted descriptor words. Better safe than sorry.

    7. Adios
This word isn’t even English! We’re writing English stories, aren’t we? So we should only ever use English words! Get that French crap out of your webnovel! Keep English pure! What would Shakespeare think if he learned that people writing in “English” a couple hundred years after his death added words from different languages into their writing? Eh?! King Henry IV would be ashamed of you.

    8. Squirm
I don’t like this word. Personally. It… yeah, I’ve never liked this word. Everyone should stop using it. Yep. Thanks.

    9. Brontosaurus 
Look, it’s been proven that the brontosaurus was a fake. If you need to reference a dinosaur in your story, at least reference one that actually existed. Ok? Is a little research too hard? Michael Chrichton did it, and he didn’t even have Wikipedia to help him. Do better, people.

    10. Cilantro
In today’s society, cilantro has a bad rep. There’s a growing group of people who don’t like cilantro. Or, at least there’s a group of people growing more vocal in their hatred of this plant. If you bend to the pressure and say it’s bad, you’ll alienate all your taco-loving readers who like the stuff. And if you dare say that cilantro is good, you risk getting a bunch of comments about how it’s bad. Instead, use the non-controversial word “coriander”. It’s literally the same plant, but you’d be surprised at how many people don’t know that.

And there you have it! Ten words you, as a writer, should NEVER use! After reading it, I’m sure you can see the superiority of this list compared to others, so you never have to click on a similar clickbait-y title ever again.

You’re welcome.
huh, quite a few new words...

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#10
I came back from a long walk across the undulating hills and dales by my home, in absolutely gelid conditions. It was necessary as I had been discouraging the growing antidisestablishmentarianism in the next town over, but still, it was horrible, and what did I choose to do upon returning? Relax in my beautiful hexagon-shaped jacuzzi? Tend to my cilantro? No, I decided to check the royal road forums and came across this dreadful post, and truth be told it made me squirm. As a noted hypochondriac, this post has been so terrible too me, I fear my mental health has been irrecoverably damaged. And you can trust me on this, because I know when somethings bad, because my brain is the size of a brontosaurus. 

Anyway, that's all I have to say to you, you fool.
Adios

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#11

Mad Wrote: 9. Brontosaurus 
Look, it’s been proven that the brontosaurus was a fake. If you need to reference a dinosaur in your story, at least reference one that actually existed. Ok? Is a little research too hard? Michael Chrichton did it, and he didn’t even have Wikipedia to help him. Do better, people.
I didn't come here to have my heart broken, and yet....


Edit: 
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It's more because they are now more aptly called the Apatosaurus, not because they didn't exist. Whew!

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#12
Okay, I get that it's a joke post (I hope most people recognize that) but it took me until Jacuzzi (Which is trademarked, not copyright, and failed it's trademark challenge 14 years ago) to finally realize it.

Some people might actually believe that this list isn't just a load of hockey pucks. I am Wargamer. Trying to say Hexagon isn't used in normal conversation is like trying to explain to a Tabletop RPG Gamer that their rolls are all truly random. It just won't convince anyone.

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#14
Pro tip-
Coriander is used to refer to the seeds, Cilantro is used to refer to the stalks and leaves. lots of herbs are referred to this way, especially in literature. and older cookbooks. (which are the best source for the kind of foods referred to in fantasy books)
Biologically, no one is particularly affected by the seed chemistry, but over a third of all humans have a bad reaction to the leaves and stalks

I find the soapy taste of cilantro disgusting, but use ground coriander in a ton of dishes.

If you call that soapy green slop that some people stuff into tacos instead of good leaf lettuce or spinach 'coriander', you are being misleading. The best tacos use Avocado anyway.

Re: Top 10 Words Writers Should NEVER Use

#18

Mad Wrote:
Brian Wrote: Coriander is used to refer to the seeds, Cilantro is used to refer to the stalks and leaves.
In the States, yes. But “coriander leaves” is a perfectly valid phrase in other parts of the world. Language is weird.


True dat, but I am an arrogant asshole American, and so I automatically assume that my audience is all American. or should want to be.

So yeah, My statement is still totally valid in the world according to Hollywood.