Would you read a story with this premise?

#1
Had this idea for a while, but since I have several other ideas in que, I was wondering if I should do this story sooner vs later.

Title: The Last Wizard

After an ancient battle for the fate of the world, the last of the great sorcerers is killed. One of the few remaining wizards who helped secure this victory is gravely wounded and must enter a magical sleep to heal his injuries. He instructs his apprentice to guard the world in his absence from the rise of any new sorcerers or sorceresses. With that, he enters a 5,000 year sleep. When he wakes, magic has all but left the world with no wizards or sorcerers around to teach the magical arts. The awakened wizard wanders the world in search of answers to what has happened during his long sleep...

Interest any of you guys?

Re: Would you read a story with this premise?

#3
It depends on the execution. This is a slightly broad premise, and it could be written in several ways. For instance, with a focus on the magic system, or on the protagonist's journey. Something that I would probably be interested in is a take akin to A Canticle for Leibowitz, which is the story of a post-apocalyptic era where the Church takes on a role akin to the aftermath of the Fall of Rome. Canticle presents the history of various monks and the Order of Leibowitz as the Church preserves theological and other knowledge and prepares for a day when it can deliver that to the world outside. All the same, it grapples with the problems of the modern world and the issues that had brought about the initial apocalyptic situation. Likewise, a story about the wizards, and their preservation of the knowledge and practice of magic in a world mostly devoid of it or even hostile to it, could be interesting. Of course, that would be a difficult story to write, and probably not the usual fare for this site, but the point I'm trying to make is that there are several approaches to the premise and they could be very different. 

It could also lead to a litRPG story, or take different paths depending on whether the protagonist resembles a regretful Wandering Jew or King Lear wandering the world and haunted by his decisions, a normal OP MC archetype as is often common here, or a pragmatic hero like Fang Yuan. It could even be an interesting CYOA, with the reader as the wizard.

There are a few things that aren't entirely clear from the premise, such as the difference between the wizards and sorcerors and what led them to war. There are also plenty of ways that things could have turned out, so it is a fairly open-ended premise that could be done in several ways.

Re: Would you read a story with this premise?

#11
I feel like I've seen this sorta premise before, especially in webcomics lately.

Personally, I feel like 5000 years is a bit too long of a time span to be asleep for. I've seen it a lot with these sorts of wizard/sorcerer/mage/great warrior stories waking up after so many thousand to ten thousands plus years to discover they now in a modern fantasy world with smart phones. Somehow they adjust super fast, know the language instantly (how convenient) and are aided by about a thousand pieces of plot armor and their "over powered out of this world power that only they have now abilities".

It quickly becomes just another form of wish fulfillment power trip. But that sorta thing depends on how the writer takes the story, characters, plot, etc.

To be honest, it also really depends on what the world looks like when the wizard in your premise wakes up. In 5000 years, realistically speaking, a lot of stuff can happen. Civilizations rise and fall, humans invent stuff, wars happen, diseases, etc. I understand most fantasy authors just ignore all of this because its fiction, but instead of 5000 years, could easily write it as 500 years and be just as effective, maybe more so. It would be more shocking to see magic disappear in 500 years rather then in 5000 years.

And if your wizard wakes up to a modern day version of his fantasy world with skyscrapers and smart phones, it would be more believable (because without magic, people would try to find new ways to do old tasks that they used to do with magic). If they succeeded, skyscrapers and smart phones, and if they failed, your MC would be waking to find himself in a world less technologically advanced then the one he knew (which would be more interesting to read tbh).

Would be interesting to discover how the world backslid, and maybe do some cool storylines where your MC is "rebuilding" civilization and all that jazz.

Guess could do that sorta in a modern setting, if he woke up in that, maybe have him "reviving" magic after 500 years of none? Non-magical governments/society, etc. reacting to the first sign of magic in over 500 years could be interesting I guess.

That's all I got this morning. Need coffee.

DrakanSigh

Re: Would you read a story with this premise?

#12

O_Weaver Wrote: I feel like I've seen this sorta premise before, especially in webcomics lately.

Personally, I feel like 5000 years is a bit too long of a time span to be asleep for. I've seen it a lot with these sorts of wizard/sorcerer/mage/great warrior stories waking up after so many thousand to ten thousands plus years to discover they now in a modern fantasy world with smart phones. Somehow they adjust super fast, know the language instantly (how convenient) and are aided by about a thousand pieces of plot armor and their "over powered out of this world power that only they have now abilities".

It quickly becomes just another form of wish fulfillment power trip. But that sorta thing depends on how the writer takes the story, characters, plot, etc.

To be honest, it also really depends on what the world looks like when the wizard in your premise wakes up. In 5000 years, realistically speaking, a lot of stuff can happen. Civilizations rise and fall, humans invent stuff, wars happen, diseases, etc. I understand most fantasy authors just ignore all of this because its fiction, but instead of 5000 years, could easily write it as 500 years and be just as effective, maybe more so. It would be more shocking to see magic disappear in 500 years rather then in 5000 years.

And if your wizard wakes up to a modern day version of his fantasy world with skyscrapers and smart phones, it would be more believable (because without magic, people would try to find new ways to do old tasks that they used to do with magic). If they succeeded, skyscrapers and smart phones, and if they failed, your MC would be waking to find himself in a world less technologically advanced then the one he knew (which would be more interesting to read tbh).

Would be interesting to discover how the world backslid, and maybe do some cool storylines where your MC is "rebuilding" civilization and all that jazz.

Guess could do that sorta in a modern setting, if he woke up in that, maybe have him "reviving" magic after 500 years of none? Non-magical governments/society, etc. reacting to the first sign of magic in over 500 years could be interesting I guess.

That's all I got this morning. Need coffee.

DrakanSigh
You have a point here. Kind of reminds me of JoJo with DIO talking all that good stuff about becoming immortal and living forever but he had only been alive for 100 years; a speck of dust in the face of real immortality, especially since he spent a good portion of that in the ocean. But, when he awoke in Stardust Crusaders, the world was only partially different and he could still fit in. Different enough to be more modern but still relatively the same that someone like DIO would be a real danger and still in the recent minds of the Joestar family.


More in real life, humans have gone from making small hunter gathering cities with a bear minimum language to the modern world in ~10,000 years. 5,000 years ago, we were still forming small cities and villages and were still warring with each other. 1,000 years ago, we were undergoing a renaissance of art, culture, and technology. Things happen really quick when the world moves forward fast enough.

Another reference is Alucard from Hellsing. Alucard is only 570 years old by the time of the show but look at just how powerful he became in those 500 years.

So, something closer to 500-1000 years would fit better. Civilizations would still have grown beyond recognition for the most part but not on the scale of extreme proportions. If we're keeping reality and human progress in mind, in 5000 years, we'd probably be living on another planet.