How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#1
I'm gonna go on a limb and say that making a title is the hardest part of writing a story. Synopsis' take a close second.
I mean, what should your title be about? About your characters or a description of your plot? 
Should you spam your tags into your title as well? 

What constitutes a good title?

Just throwing this question out there, when I realised 'B R I C K' may not be a good title...
On this point, I'm tossing up between changing it to either 'More Than Brick' (non plural intentional) or 'Brick and Ribbon.'
OR (hidden third option) just leaving it as 'B R I C K'.

So I asketh of thee fellow writers and readers what you think makes a title appealing to you!

Re: How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#6

StolenPasta Wrote: What constitutes a good title?


Good question. Let me know once you've figured out the answer, lol. My titling abilities are...
...
...
Yeeeeah. 
StolenPasta Wrote: Just throwing this question out there, when I realised 'B R I C K' may not be a good title...
On this point, I'm tossing up between changing it to either 'More Than Brick' (non plural intentional) or 'Brick and Ribbon.'
OR (hidden third option) just leaving it as 'B R I C K'.

So I asketh of thee fellow writers and readers what you think makes a title appealing to you!


I kind of like "Brick and Ribbon", but it seems to be missing something. 

"Brick and Ribbon: A Non-Romance"? "Brick and Ribbon: A Comedy"? "Brick: The Not-Musical"? "Brick and Ribbon: The Beginning"?  "The Brick: Not A Furniture Store"?  peogiggle

Re: How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#7
In my opinion, the title should be unique, distinct, and tell me what I am in for.

Actually doing that is hard. I am also personally turned away from any story that starts with "reincarnated... Reborn... Brought to another world..." Guess I am in for some Isekai, but damn, please just make the title more unique. I am not the reader for that and that is okay, since they seem to work pretty well marketing wise.

Re: How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#10
Maybe a good, solid foundation of bricks worked for titles a hundred years ago, but now... if you look up any non-weird title you can think of, there's probably a dozen books, movies, or songs that have the title.
Think picking cool superhero names in City of Heroes after 2 years.

Me, My titles are just based on weird thoughts I had when considering a book.

I, Kobold was what caused me to start writing it in the first place. A Kobold is a monster. What makes a monster? Do they have to be evil? Is it their body or their mind that makes them a monster? If you are a human with an alien thought pattern, are you a monster? If you are a beast with a human mind, are you a monster? Can you have BOTH and still not be a monster? What about good and evil? It's writing itself.

The Human Meatball was just what I casually referred to the random senseless idiots that have no real meaning in their lives other than going out and trying to be relevant by smashing someone else. Basically human versions of NPC's who may be educated, but lack sense. They don't ever have an original thought, just parroting what other people think without once actually thinking about them. Yeah, they may not stick to scripted dialogue, but they damned sure have a list of preprogrammed actions that pop out if you question them about something they have never thought about for themselves, and for most people, that's pretty much every single thing that doesn't start with "What is your favorite...?" Most people don't have existential questions, moral dilemnas, or crises of faith without it being forced on them. Why not? Isn't that what thinking is? Again, the book is writing itself.


Huh. one of the people on another thread was right. I think too much about the impact of the mind. I should add a 'psychological' tag to all my books.

Re: How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#11
imo title doesn't need to be the classic "I'm a devil but I was supposed to be a hero" by which I mean, title doesn't need to be a shortened synopsis lol. Simple things are best, look at some older series, "The Wheel of Time," which I read in my youth is big right now, the wheel is a force in the universe but you wouldn't say the books are ABOUT the wheel. Some titles are names, like the young adult series "Artemis Fowl" which just got a bad movie :) 
Titles should be something that means something to you within the series, there's no set way to make a gripping title, honestly for the things I've written the title comes far after I'm 20 pages into the book. Then sometimes it just clicks and you have a good working title. 
My advice is, don't force yourself to title, let it come to you  DrakanMelt

Re: How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#13

The Wrote:
HammieTheHamster Wrote: Write the story first, worry about the title last. By the time you've finished the story, the title will already become apparent. You'll know precisely how your story starts, progresses, and finishes, and how best to describe it through its title.
The problem is. You have to give the title when you publish yur first fic

You don't write the book first? Or for webfic, at least a couple of dozen chapters?

Re: How does one make a title? With a foundation of bricks?

#14
Choices are either you go with the current norm in webnovels or you try a more "traditional" way of making a title. The japanese started the trend with titles as shortened synopsis because webnovel/lightnovel readers usually are genre-based. Like if one is an isekai fan, he goes to a bookstore, he'll look for a lightnovel about isekai. He doesn't go to the store to look through various kinds of stories to try one out; he has a specific thing in mind and most likely won't try other genres. That is why titles of lightnovels are synopsis. The rest of the media catering to those genres (isekai, rebirth, litrpg, subsets of power fantasy, etc., you guys know the drill) followed that convention. RR have a preference for those genres, which is why that trend was adopted here. 

The internet is fast paced. A reader scrolling through a list of titles looking for reincarnation will most likely stop and check out a story with "Re:". It's a marketing thing. The next iteration of that trend is adding tags on titles. Again, a product of the internet being fast-paced.

You can also go for a more traditional way of making a title. The title for my story is just "REND". That's it. However, it is not under the mainstream genres of RoyalRoad, so it's actually fine, and probably better for it not to follow the convention since it signals the reader that it's a different genre than the popular ones. If your story is under the mainstream genres, then it helps in marketability to follow the norm. Norms are norms for a reason.