Reaching Readers

#1
Hello, I'm very new to the whole writing thing. I've started posting a bit of my fiction in hopes of getting feedback. 
my question (I'm not sure where else to put it) is this:

What are the best ways to improve my chances of being seen, and especially improve the chances of getting responses to my work.

Re: Reaching Readers

#2

LloydSA Wrote: Hello, I'm very new to the whole writing thing. I've started posting a bit of my fiction in hopes of getting feedback. 
my question (I'm not sure where else to put it) is this:

What are the best ways to improve my chances of being seen, and especially improve the chances of getting responses to my work.
Posting a lot, this is really the best way to do it. What I can suggest is making use of the volume thing. Delete one of your books, create a volume. Then state in your summary that genres might change depending on the book. Just in case it becomes a bit too different. However, if it is connected, you should be fine. Though, if it is connected, but different genres. Then I suggest the statement.

Anyway, you can do one release a day alternating the release between your works. You can make splits, with a part stating the summary as well as the cover of another book. Just remember to organize your work with the reorder function. Since the volumes only affects the glossary I suppose you can call it. 

Re: Reaching Readers

#5
Readers rarely leave much for comments. Consider anything you get a bonus.

If you're brand new to writing, I strongly encourage you to invest in classes, tutors or a writing coach who can see your writing and work with you on it. Read up on how to create stories. And view everything as practice without any expectation of success. Too many people think they'll just sit down and write the next hit book and don't realize how hard that is. 

If you want real feedback on your work, use dedicated beta readers. You can occasionally find free ones in Goodreads groups. I recommend going on Fver and paying $50-100 for a better beta reader. They give a ton of feedback and it's worth the money.

If you have a completed book and have been through beta readers a few times, then consider an editor. A manuscript critique for a novel will cost about $500-750, but will provide more feedback than any other source. And of higher quality. 

Re: Reaching Readers

#6
I just speedily scanned through your book, so take this with a grain of salt. I suggest not doing those prologue things, they usually don't have a good effect for webnovels. Plus, that starting letter thing is a bad idea. Readers will click read, will start with that letter thing, and will just have no clue what's going on. You have to consider that people click away so fast now because there are thousands and thousands of choices out there. If something is important, then it's chapter one. 

You also have weird formatting with your dialogues and paragraphing. Not sure if that's intentional or an error of your copy-paste. The chapters themselves are also kind of short with not much progression in each one. Better stick some parts together for a better reading experience. The synopsis also needs work to catch readers' attention. 

Anyway, that's just my preliminary thoughts. I rambled on in my short break from my own writing. On the original question, it's really hard to gain readers at the start. Readers attract more readers, yeah, but you should first focus on getting the initial readers so you'll have more interaction. And then comes my bits of advice above. I hope you don't take it the wrong way. 

Re: Reaching Readers

#8
This is really not answering the question, but, if you want some free writing resources, I suggest watching the Brandon Sanderson lectures on youtube. They are free and helped me a lot to get my writing to the next level. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0cf-qdZ7GbA&list=PLSH_xM-KC3Zv-79sVZTTj-YA6IAqh8qeQ

About getting readers, that's hard at the beginning. Most people won't give their time to read and critique a new novel by an unknown author. When I was a reader only, I know I wouldn't start reading anything that was under 10k words. And even if I got to the first chapter, I would abandon it quickly if it wasn't polished enough, unless the premise blew my mind. Now I'm trying to read and comment new fictions, since I know how much one tiny comment can make the day of an aspiring author.

What to do about it? Well, comment swaps and/or review swaps are a way. Now, if you are just starting and aren't that confident in your skills yet, I would go for the former. Reviews need to be as objective as possible, so a reviewer might wreck your fiction and tank your rating. Better if you get the feedback as a comment, so you can work on it.