Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#3
I trained:
-a certain okinawan style karate
-kobudo
-wing chun
-boxing
-wrestling

Out of these styles, boxing was my favorite and it's also something you can do on your own, especially if you have a boxing bag. Though for da streets I'd advise wrestling.

But in fiction, I guess anything goes. Kung fu looks great on demonstration, and if you have qi to make it work then I guess that would be my martial art of choice. 

For melee weapons, naginata is my favorite, but I also have a thing for double-edged straight swords and halberds. Also throwing knives are badass, though it takes a lot of fantasy to make them work~

Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#6
I wouldn't use it in MMA even if I practiced it because it's just not a sportsmanship kind of move, but... when practicing stances I'm fond of elbow attacks. They're good for defense and they're merciless punishers. 

They're one of the hand to hand combat versions of the boar spear. Someone rushing at you? Yeah you need to get through their hands, but if you can do that before they slow down, take a step in and have them collide face-first with a pointy bit of bone. 

Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#7
“You should not have a favorite weapon, or, by the way, any kind of exaggerated preference. Becoming too attached to a weapon is as bad as not knowing it well enough. You should not imitate others, but use that which suits you, and that you can handle with competence. To entertain preferences is bad for both commanders and soldiers. “

— Musashi Miyamoto, “The Book the Five Rings”

A carpenter has no favorite technique, neither should a fighter for the same reason.
-
Quick draw is the coolest though.

Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#10
I guess it would depend on what you're trying to convey in the fight, if it were a particularly low-level fight where someone was absolutely destroying their opponent, a clinch is a good move. A clinch looks like this
clinch
It's really useful for knees, and if you keep it tight your opponent can't break out. Another bonus is that if they do break out, your opponent is often open to another attack. Overall it is a really good move, however it really isn't that exciting. I guess it just all comes down to what you want your fight to feel like to your audience.

Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#12

Zeepolian Wrote: I'm surprised nobody's mentioned it, but like: the entirety of capoeira. The history of capoeira alone is fascinating enough, but seeing it in action is something else.
I'm not sure, I took a look at capoeira, and while some of it looked cool, most of it felt choreographed to me. I'm not saying it actually was, but it barely felt like a fight. Capoeira would probably be a lot cooler to watch in a fantasy setting where people can become superhuman or have powers, but in real life it doesn't look particularly effective.

Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#14

Zeepolian Wrote: I mean, capoeira was invented by slaves who were bound at the ankles by chains and had to hide their practicing of martial arts from their slaveowners by disguising it as a form of dance. So yes, it is incredibly choreographed in that sense, and capoeira gets used a lot for more meditative than combative purposes these days, but the principle for fiction is the same.
Ah, I see what you meant about the history being interesting.

Re: What is your Favorite Fighting/MA Technique?

#16
Its kind of a joke answer, but there's this move I see over and over again in TV and movies.  A person will grab their opponent's wrist and twist it hard, and the opponent does a front flip and usually lands on their back.  I'm not really a martial artist, but the move never made sense to me physically.  Seems like all that would do is sprain your wrist, not cause you to flip violently onto the ground, but I could be wrong.  It's just kind of amusing how often I see that done in multimedia.  Its like the fighting technique version of the Wilhelm scream.