What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#1
I'm actually looking to get a new book cover about my story because I've been told that mine is not very appealing yet I'm not an artist and I don't know what suits best the high fantasy crowd.

My book isn't an isekai or a lit rpg but more of a classical fast-paced high fantasy book more directed towards the young adult market.

I'd like something that represent well the story and maybe features some Treeman in it because they're the mains characters of the story and the central focal point. But I've been told that the green colors make people puke and that the generic 'Treeman' is kinda bland.

I'd like to get some more data points and maybe have more feedback/opinions on my current cover and what would be better to replace it.

Here is the synopsis of the story: A young arbolarbre (Treeman) called Oak Quercus must stop his carnivorous mad King (Xidor Cedre) from sending his nation into a war to feed his gluttony for flesh and his  sudden quest for immortality.

However, he will have to face opposition from his vegetarian countrymen with diverging opinions on how to stop the King's madness.  

If you are interested in helping me and maybe read the few chapters to understand my story, it'd be great.

Here is my current cover (Signature)

Re: What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#2
I think you should go with your other book cover, highlighted in green around the edges, like this oe. The picture on this cover is too busy, and not very appealing. The image on the other cover was prettier.

That said, what sells a book best is a human torso. Go and look at the point-of-purchase display of any book store. You will see guys without their shirts and girls with lots of cleavage.

Human torsos sell a book. 😸

Re: What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#3

ArDeeBurger Wrote: I think you should go with your other book cover, highlighted in green areound the edges, like this oe. The picture on this cover is too busy, and not very appealing. The image on the other cover was prettier.

That said, what sells a book best is a human torso. Go and look at the point-of-purchase display of any book store. You will see guys without their shirts and girls with lots of cleavage.

Human torsos sell a book. 😸
Yeah but there are no humans in my story so. And I've asked someone to design me a new cover, it should be better. And putting a torso would give the wrong impression for my book. 

Re: What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#4

Jayrayme6 Wrote:
ArDeeBurger Wrote: I think you should go with your other book cover, highlighted in green areound the edges, like this oe. The picture on this cover is too busy, and not very appealing. The image on the other cover was prettier.

That said, what sells a book best is a human torso. Go and look at the point-of-purchase display of any book store. You will see guys without their shirts and girls with lots of cleavage.

Human torsos sell a book. 😸
Yeah but there are no humans in my story so. And I've asked someone to design me a new cover, it should be better. And putting a torso would give the wrong impression for my book.
I'm having about the same problem in the same genre. I've got some negative feedback about my current cover but I'm not sure what I should go for and where to request such a cover. But I think the main point is that my cover isn't giving much away of the story and genre.

Re: What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#5

Jayrayme6 Wrote: I'd like to get some more data points and maybe have more feedback/opinions on my current cover and what would be better to replace it.


I actually like your current cover, and I think it matches genre conventions for the most part if you compare it to other high fantasy/YA high fantasy covers (I just Googled ya high fantasy and went to images). What I do think though is that it looks a bit dark. If you could lighten the colors and lighten the color of the title, I think it'd catch more attention. My opinion is just another data point though lol

Re: What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#7
I bought a subscription to Book Brush so I could view and make covers for myself, messing around with their genre suggestions etc., but to learn the process. My market book covers are through a design firm who I looked through their galleries of proven books to get ideas to ensure they would know what I was talking about. (not all designers are good at fantasy). The cover art for my series is hand drawn and digitally mastered, so they are original and unique, and they've had excellent feedback on the market, but, it took research. The advice I was given was to find other books close to your genre, and sub-genres (if you say fantasy, non-human, etc.) and look at your peers in those categories, you'll start to get ideas. Sometimes it's so unique you start from scratch, other times you can go with pre-made or pre-conceptualized art, (like Fiverr, etc.) for very cheap and well worth it if you plan to market. In my humble opinion, love your creation and stand up for it but within market perimeters and while the process will tear up you inside to build them, the finished art is worth the effort. Good luck, your book sounds great!

Re: What makes a fantasy book cover succesful?

#8
You need to catch someone's interest. I've found a few factors that play into it.

1. Unique: If you have an indie cover, your story mightn't stand out on Royal Road but it might stand out on Webnovel and Scribblehub where most of them are in an anime style. Having a professional-looking cover will let you stand out almost everywhere since most make do with indie unless you're, wait for it... on Amazon. You're highly likely to draw my attention on any site by having a cool-looking cover that's been done by a professional.

2. Cool & Simple Font: If I can't read your book's title, then I'll most likely not read the book at all. There are some exceptions but they're exceptions, not the norm. The font you have at the moment isn't really readable and that turns me away from it.

3. Minimalism: Not in the literal sense but having a cover that's too cluttered isn't likely to draw attention. It looks too full and as a result, too tiring. Having an emphasis is for the better most of the time.