Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#1
It feels weird to put this in a post, mostly because I don't like to talk about my insecurities. 
But I thought maybe someone had an answer. 

I've always been insecure and have had low self-esteem since I was young. This has affected how I view my writing, too. I always seek to improve through feedback, and as long as the feedback is valid, I appreciate all of it, good or bad, and try to improve. I can sometimes appreciate a 1-star review more than a 5-star review for that reason. Yet, I am shy with my writing; like, I want to be seen, and I don't want to at the same time. 
That's why I write under pen names with everything. If it goes down in flames, I don't go with it and just start over.

I have books published in a different genre than what fits here on RR (paranormal cozy mystery) and though it has a 4.5-star rating, I wouldn't tell my parents or friends, or anyone that knows me that I've published the books I said I was writing. 
Well, I accidentally told them one day, and they purchased the book. Then, of course, they told the rest of the family, and they purchased books and started talking about "I know this journalist who would love to write an article about you, when do you have time for an interview?" And... I had a full-blown panic attack. 
Before my pen name came out to them, I had given away over 900 books for free, and that didn't give me any qualms at all. 
When my boyfriend's mother had her birthday party, I took the first opportunity to hide it behind the other books on the shelf just in case someone would see and ask about it. Let's just say, self-promoting comes hard to me. A big player, I suppose, is that I write in English even though I've only spoken the language for 15 years. 

So, if anyone relates—you're not alone out there! (or maybe I am, who knows)


I post my litrpg/gamelit project here and appreciate any and all feedback and am amazed that people want to follow or even favorite the story, but I in my mind, I just can't figure out how to feel that the story is worth their interest. 
 
I have no problem congratulating others on their successes and feel so overjoyed at their accomplishments (and tell them so) but I just don't see it when it comes to my own. If it was a friend of mine who had done the same, I would feel very proud of them. How does one apply that to one's own accomplishments and successes? 

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What I'd like to know is if you've been in this type of mindset/situation, how did you deal with it?

And if you haven't been in that mindset/situation, how do you think about your work and promote it with a sense of pride, that this is something that people want to read? 



Sorry for the rambling post. Since this has to do with self-promoting and such, I hope I put it where it belongs in the forum.

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#2
I'm super insecure about my writing as well. I can't stand my own writings and I constantly compare myself to others which really only further puts me down because I think my writing still isn't good enough for my standards. I'm in the same boat you're in when you said you want to be seen but at the same time don't want to be. I'm not even sure why I'm compelled to feel this way but I try to think differently about it rather than indulging in those negative thoughts. Those negative thoughts often try to rationalize my terrible perception of myself.

I guess the only advice I can give is to stop comparing yourself to others and to view your accomplishments on their own merit. Negative thoughts are often an exaggeration and once you get past that you realize maybe it wasn't so bad after all..?

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#3
To be honest, when I began writing, I was quite insecure. It didn't feel as bad as it probably does for some people, because I was blinded by excitement and the fact it was only fanfiction. With time as reviews came, the insecurity came back in full force and I began to wonder if I even wanted to continue. Thankfully I did and just pushed on, trying to improve as much as I could, and in the meantime, I tried to acquire the so-called "thick skin".

I was lucky because as time went by, the insecurity mostly went away, only hiding in the deepest parts of my mind. My work was my own and even if others didn't like it, I knew that I did my best. Of course, you need to take constructive criticism seriously, but never let it stop you. Negative thoughts only halt your progress as a writer.

As for the advice...

As Tridetect wrote, don't compare yourself to others. Enjoy your work and take pride in it. You tried your best to show the world your ideas without wanting anything back. Just enjoy the ride and strive to be an even better writer. Besides, remember that there is always someone out there who will enjoy your idea.

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#4
Thanks your replies :) It's true that one shouldn't compare oneself to other writers, and actually, I don't. I can feel pretty good about a piece I've written, almost proud or at least good enough, but the day after I publish it, no matter how much time I've spent on editing it or what people have said, I want to take it down.

I'm not sure why this happens, because the two times I've gotten a 1-star review on my published works, I got good pointers from one, and the other had read all six different short stories (yet another genre) and said it wasn't for them (which I thought was a bit funny) so reviews and negativity don't really bother me. Still, it scares me to death if anyone I knew would read my work, and that's the main issue which I can't seem to correct—as long as no one knows I'm writing it, it feels okay, but as soon as someone "finds out" I want to puke and hide in a corner @[email protected]

And this is probably weird, because the post in itself handles something negative, but I'm not looking in from negativity—more curiosity and in search of possible solutions to better myself and how I can get comfortable with self-promotion because I challenge my anxiety and such all the time, but it doesn't seem to help much -.-''

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#5
There is a different between random people  seeing what you made and those who know you the most.

Especially since a lot of creatives put pieces of themselves in there and its easier to have those single puzzle pieces laid out where the random reason likely wouldn't notice it's you or have any reason to suspect vs the people closest to you seeing the puzzle piece of yourself and pulling it out talking about it.

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#6
As someone who used to be, 

  I became more secure by sharing it with people. I started out with close family members that I trusted and I asked for the best feedback they could give. I made corrections and felt that I had became a better writer. 

  Then I shared it with close friends and did the same thing. I improved again and got more confident. 

  Small writing group, big writing group, school publications, local newspapers, random people on the internet. On and on the cycle went. 

 So basically, I built my confidence up. Posting to a new and bigger group always scared the crap out of me, but I was able to because I had steadily been building my confidence up. I never could have just joined a writing group starting out for example. 

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#7
sunflower Wrote: There is a different between random people  seeing what you made and those who know you the most.

Especially since a lot of creatives put pieces of themselves in there and its easier to have those single puzzle pieces laid out where the random reason likely wouldn't notice it's you or have any reason to suspect vs the people closest to you seeing the puzzle piece of yourself and pulling it out talking about it.

You make a really good point there, and it might be a big part of my issues. I also believe that I don’t want to let them down when they view my author aspirations as so natural that I can’t fail.
I studied to become a Swedish linguist because that was the closest education I could use in order to become an editor, and a major part of the program had mandatory creative writing courses. I hated writing, but I absolutely loved books and wanted to work with helping authors put out the best books they could. I grew to like writing, and when I told my parents I wanted to become an author, they looked at me, confused, and said; ”did you figure that out now? We knew that since you learned how to read.” That comment has come back to me over and over, and it’s a little bit like I can’t dare to fail when they believe I’m fated to write books, haha. Because what if I do something that isn’t good enough? Are my stories good enough? Am I worthy to be called an author? How do I have the audacity to publish things that aren’t perfect? I’m aware that a perfect work of fiction will never exist, but these are the base questions. And they probably won’t help my fear of not being good enough when this sort of trust has been put in me, but I guess I’ll just keep working on the confidence and try to start trusting that my parents won’t be overly disappointed (which should have become clear once my dad brought my book to his work and his colleagues took turns reading it, but it only brought more anxiety—bringing shame to one’s family, and all that, haha). And yes, it sounds negative again, but it’s purely my observations about my situation.

Sorry, this turned into a psychological and somewhat philosophical rant. I hope it doesn’t bother anyone, and at best, I hope that people with the same issues can take heart in that they’re not alone in the struggle. 

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#8
Hey Ely, I know I'm three days late on a reply here, but reading your thoughts, I've got a lot of replies. Maybe you'd like the different perspective? I'll be a bit more scathing than the others, but it's all coming from a good place, I swear. I'm replying because I always get sad when I see people shooting themselves in the foot. I'm going to address everything you've written.




Quote:I've always been insecure and have had low self-esteem since I was young. This has affected how I view my writing, too. I always seek to improve through feedback, and as long as the feedback is valid, I appreciate all of it, good or bad, and try to improve. I can sometimes appreciate a 1-star review more than a 5-star review for that reason. Yet, I am shy with my writing; like, I want to be seen, and I don't want to at the same time. 



I feel that. That must suck, sincerely. Good on you for being so good about criticism. Keep that trait.



Quote:That's why I write under pen names with everything. If it goes down in flames, I don't go with it and just start over.


Yeah! 100%! That's what the pros do. If they put out a stinker, eviscerate the pen name! Yeah, pen names are a great tool.


Quote:I have books published in a different genre than what fits here on RR (paranormal cozy mystery) and though it has a 4.5-star rating, I wouldn't tell my parents or friends, or anyone that knows me that I've published the books I said I was writing. 
Cool! Legit. Never heard of 'cozy mystery.' Sounds cool! 4.5 is good! Yeah, don't worry, you're not strange. I have two books with 4.7 ratings on amazon. I WOULD NEVER TELL MY MOTHER. It's my business. I don't know the intricacies of the papers my friends and families are pushing at the office. They don't need to know the intricracies of the words I'm putting on the page.



Quote:Well, I accidentally told them one day, and they purchased the book. Then, of course, they told the rest of the family, and they purchased books and started talking about "I know this journalist who would love to write an article about you, when do you have time for an interview?" And... I had a full-blown panic attack. 



There is nothing that writers can tell you that can help this, sincerely. It sucks that that's how rough things are for you. If this is something that is THAT scary for you, really commit to not letting anyone know anything ever. Otherwise, what can you do? Just release until the situation loses its edge? I'm not a therapist, so I'm not going to advise you on something that causes you panic attacks.


Quote:I have no problem congratulating others on their successes and feel so overjoyed at their accomplishments (and tell them so) but I just don't see it when it comes to my own. If it was a friend of mine who had done the same, I would feel very proud of them. How does one apply that to one's own accomplishments and successes? 
How does one apply that to one's own accomplishments and successes? 

So again, I think you're a lovely person. But with regards to the bolded spot. I've noticed a pattern. It seems like you're very in your own head. There's no very easy fix for that other than trying to adopt new perspectives. With regard to that question. I don't think you need to necessarily apply your standards for others to yourself. For you, it might be better for you to just accept you're a hypocrite in this regard. If you just accept that you're never going to be able to apply the same standard to yourself, maybe that in of itself will give you the freedom to get on with things. It'd be like, "Yeah. Not happy with this, but I have things to do."
At the end of the day, people are hypocrites who don't follow their own standards. it's not like this makes you terrible. The problem is when you wallow on the problem.



Quote:Thanks your replies :) It's true that one shouldn't compare oneself to other writers, and actually, I don't.
Actually, I get the spirit behind this, especially if someone has a vulnerable disposition but here's a different perspective:
It's not practical to NOT compare yourself. 
No, I will 100% compare myself to other authors. I need to know what they're doing to succeed. Comparing yourself is the process by which you understand the differences between you and someone else. If you're on amazon, if you want to succeed in the current marketplace, you HAVE to look at what your contemporaries are doing. Look at the cover-compare it to yours. Look at the trends, compare it to yours. Look at the tropes used-compare it to yours. If you want to succeed, you have to reach the bare minimum of whatever space you're competing in.
Now mind you, don't just look at someone's numbers and despair. That's so shallow. Go deep. Understand. Be hungry. 100% compare everything. And if you think they're better than you, commit it to memory every single reason, every single trick, every single flourish, that you think led to their success.



Quote: I can feel pretty good about a piece I've written, almost proud or at least good enough, but the day after I publish it, no matter how much time I've spent on editing it or what people have said, I want to take it down.
Actually, I think this is normal. The way I see it. The 'me' that wrote a book last year. That's not me anymore. That's a guy I once knew. Yeah, I'm not happy what I wrote back then. But I wont take it down after the first half year. I can't betray the me that liked it. And mind you, there's levels. If the book was truly terrible, or if there's an external, marketing related issue, then yeah, take it down. But if you were actually loving of your story at any point, then how could you kill the work that that person was happy about?



Quote:I'm not sure why this happens, because the two times I've gotten a 1-star review on my published works, I got good pointers from one, and the other had read all six different short stories (yet another genre) and said it wasn't for them (which I thought was a bit funny) so reviews and negativity don't really bother me. Still, it scares me to death if anyone I knew would read my work, and that's the main issue which I can't seem to correct—as long as no one knows I'm writing it, it feels okay, but as soon as someone "finds out" I want to puke and hide in a corner @[email protected]

So again, you seem lovely, but again we come back to that anxiety issue. Yeah, become a turtle. Hide. No shame. You don't need to be in a position where people know you do stuff. If you do want advice. maybe make dummy books. For example, just churn something out, don't really think about it. Just look at a story beat sheet and crank out some 40,000 words. Then, if people ask, point them to that. Maybe the lack of investment will make it easier. If you have less of a stake in a story, maybe that'll make a difference for you. That's what I did. I can't go into the nuances of the genres I wrote in, so I just made a genric story to get people off my back. If the story happens to be popular, well, that's a wonderful problem to have.


Quote:And this is probably weird, because the post in itself handles something negative, but I'm not looking in from negativity—more curiosity and in search of possible solutions to better myself and how I can get comfortable with self-promotion because I challenge my anxiety and such all the time, but it doesn't seem to help much -.-''

So, I mentioned this before, but there's a limit to how much people on the internet can help anxiety, unfortunately. Looking at the other replies, what you're getting back mostly is avoiding troublesome habits and also 'getting used' to the thing.


So, your final paragraph is what told me the most about you. I think you're too in your head, and you're over-glorifying some ideas.

Quote:You make a really good point there, and it might be a big part of my issues. I also believe that I don’t want to let them down when they view my author aspirations as so natural that I can’t fail.

So, I was following your story, but this line came out before the thing about your parents believing in you. (Super adorable btw, that's cool.) Anyway, regardless. First off, since when did having aspirations equate to being good. Could you imagine someone with aspirations of a boxer never failing? Never losing a match? Never losing a spar? Failure is part of life. I don't care how much you want to be something, that's not going to substitute the work that goes into learning the game. You know what natural aspirations lead to? It's not the lack of failure, it's the stubbornness to keep trying after failing. Get rid of the thought that you cant fail. Get rid of the thought that you can't fail because your loved think you cant fail. Go ask them how often they fail at little things and remind yourself that little failures and big failures are part of life. Chances are, the fact you're hurting over this means you haven't given up. That's probably your aspiration talking. The perception that you think your loved ones think you can't fail is internal strife.


 
Quote:That comment has come back to me over and over, and it’s a little bit like I can’t dare to fail when they believe I’m fated to write books, haha.

So, I skipped a bit(I think you're cool for what you wanted to do), but I skipped because this is where you carried on. Given how this story got strung, you must have really been caught up in the emotion to have repeated it. Anyway, I wonder, have you asked your parents if they think you'll suffer some failures as you go along? Again, I can't fathom how anyone could think a craft can be mastered without failures. If your parents are as lovely as they seem to be, how could they think everything would be so simple? Seriously, have you asked them if they think you'll never have a stinker book? Also, that grammatically appropriate 'haha.' What were you trying to convey? Were you pitying yourself? Were you trying to let us know that you're laughing at yourself? Why be so dramatic? Why go the extra mile to add that tag in that implies certain things about your emotional state. You didn't do it anywhere else. When you said that, were you devaluing yourself in any way'?



Quote: Because what if I do something that isn’t good enough?


That'll probably happen. Welcome to the club. The exact same failure probably wont happen twice.


Quote: Are my stories good enough?


Probably not. Lots of stories go unpublished. If you start from there though, you'll eventually have one so great you yourself wont be able to take it away from past you.


Quote: Am I worthy to be called an author?
No? Why are we turning a job title into such a big deal? Can you imagine asking myself, "am I worthy of calling myself a video editor", actually, not the best example. Really, the author title is a little tricky because of the low barrier to entry, But yea, err on the side of caution and say no. Trying to strive for these things you built up in your head might be doing you more bad than good... maybe... but again, not a therapist. Why not just be a part-time writer? Or just someone that writes stories? Espescially for you who doesn't want to be seen by those nearby. Why bother with a distinction that would be used mostly by the people you don't want to be seen by?



Quote:How do I have the audacity to publish things that aren’t perfect?
This is where someone could tell you are REALLY in your head. Imagine being so high and mighty that you have to call something that everyone else does something 'audacious.' 

It's not a big deal. Publish your work, take the critiques and move on. It's okay for today's best to be tomorrows checkpoint.


Quote:And they probably won’t help my fear of not being good enough when this sort of trust has been put in me, 

What trust has been put in you? Have you been told that you need to support your family of four with the money that you make from selling books? Because, in that case, there are other things you could do that would make that money, but really, what trust has been placed in you? That said, if livelihoods are on the line here and someone's forcing you to be a writer, or the circumstances are, then I am sincerely sorry and really hope you are able to find success in the future.



Quote:I guess I’ll just keep working on the confidence and try to start trusting that my parents won’t be overly disappointed

I'm very curious as to whether or not they think its impossible for you to experience setbacks on your journey.


Quote:(bringing shame to one’s family, and all that, haha)
For what? Having a book that not everyone likes? That's a pretty low bar. In the grand scheme of things, being a writer can be pretty shameful for a lot of career focused families. The fact your family was happy from the get-go really makes it seem like they're cool. Have they told you to give up?



Quote:Sorry, this turned into a psychological and somewhat philosophical rant
I'm glad you called it philosophical. In my experience, philosophy is the enemy of practicality. In the time it takes you to fret, I could churn out a 30k word book and pop it on amazon. Just like that. Might be the worst book ever, or it might be great. Point is, philosophy isn't going to help you. You can come up with a 101 ways that you're bringing shame to your family, but what does that do? It just gives you 101 ways to attack yourself. What a waste of time. That said, if you channel it into a story it's different but again, waste of time. And in your case, you're well past the stage of identification. It really just seems like you're wallowing. So what are you going to do?


Seems like your parents are a big thing in your life. Have you asked them?


Quote:I hope it doesn’t bother anyone, and at best, I hope that people with the same issues can take heart in that they’re not alone in the struggle. 

I hope you know you're not alone in the struggle either =]


Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#9
Thank you so much for your effort in composing your reply, and I don’t find it scathing at all—weird as it sounds, it made me feel calm, like stepping into a hug.
Like you’ve mentioned in the post, I have a tendency to get stuck in my head—it’s just how I’m programmed, and it can be thoughts of anxiety, or planning out stories, or something completely different. I usually have to either listen to something or think a word repeatedly to drift off to sleep. And you are also correct that going further into the rabbit holes in my mind usually doesn’t end in a good place (at least where the psychological is concerned), so I usually don’t. Except when it comes to writing. 
In the way you describe comparing things to other authors, then yes. I’m pretty close to being called a copycat, from tropes to cover. I try to gain whatever knowledge I have and to make use of it. What I don’t compare and what people usually mean with comparing with other authors is their writing (outside of tropes or something story-related), and that’s something I don’t do. I also won’t change my mind about criticism, either of myself or my work, because there’s always improvements that can be made and/or adapted—that’s kind of a hypocritical statement as well, considering the ”perfect book” pondering above, but I wholeheartedly stand by that belief. Like the audacity statement; that’s something that only pertains to my own works, while I think that others should of course publish their stories if they want to and it’s something they believe in. 

That said, you make a valid point with saying this work is something the earlier me liked, and I think I’ll write that down somewhere to get back to!
Actually, your whole post is full of valid points :)

You also mention my parents, and how they relate to this struggle of mine. They are very nice, have always been the sort of people with the mindset; go out there, try things, figure out what works and what doesn’t, what you like and what you don’t like. Honestly, I couldn’t bring this up to them. I’ve told them before that I have a pen name and they pestered me with questions what it was, etc. The problem I’m facing is more of a luxury one—they’re proud of me and want to let the whole world know it. They would understand that I had failures, and they would still be proud. And that’s somewhat the issue—that I’m somehow cheapening their pride because they support my less-than-stellar books. And I kind of don’t want to do that ^^’ I know it sounds silly, but that’s the way my mind works. At least at the moment. 

I do still write, and will continue to write. I’m stubborn as can be, so unless there are 101+ good, valid arguments to why I should quit, I won’t. And if those arguments come, I might just create another pen name, haha. 

Also, usually when I write out haha, I mean I found something funny or silly, even if it’s selfdepricating :)

Thank you so much, again, for your insights and the time you took to write this answer. I’ll surely come back once in a while to tell myself that the thoughts harassing me are silly. It’s bound to help, somewhat :) 

Maybe some day, I’ll be able to show my books and feel good that my parents (and other close relations) are proud of me.



Sometimes, it’s very good to have someone who has the guts to tell you you’re silly :)

By the way, what types of books do you write? 

And I’m totally stealing the idea of a dummy book :D That’s such a great idea!

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#11
Great! Thank you for receiving this kindly. I'll reply in largely the same way just to make sure I'm not missing important bits. One thing I want to preface though is that I think you're already a winner. And, it would be unfortunate for you to be caught by your words and stuck in a cage that you made. That said, the challenges you're facing don't go away over night, so I sincerely hope you find strategies that work. As I reply, you might notice a theme.


Quote:...I also won’t change my mind about criticism, either of myself or my work, because there’s always improvements that can be made and/or adapted—that’s kind of a hypocritical statement as well, considering the ”perfect book” pondering above, but I wholeheartedly stand by that belief. Like the audacity statement; that’s something that only pertains to my own works, while I think that others should of course publish their stories if they want to and it’s something they believe in. 
So I personally think your strategy on being a copycat is good. This paragraph and the portion before it was interesting. I don't think its bad to be a hypocrite about the self-critique. But that audacity. What I want to make sure is conveyed is to be careful of unfairly hoisting yourself on a pedestal too high. It's fine to be critical but there's that line where it goes too far. Stay cognizant of that.



Quote:Honestly, I couldn’t bring this up to them. I’ve told them before that I have a pen name and they pestered me with questions what it was, etc. The problem I’m facing is more of a luxury one—they’re proud of me and want to let the whole world know it. They would understand that I had failures, and they would still be proud. And that’s somewhat the issue—that I’m somehow cheapening their pride because they support my less-than-stellar books. And I kind of don’t want to do that ^^’ I know it sounds silly, but that’s the way my mind works. At least at the moment. 
Well, it's great that you're honest! And I completely understand the pestering; it's why I keep things underwraps too. Reading this part, it's good to know what you don't want to do. Honestly, seeing you write that, I would still say, why not ask them if you're cheapening their pride? Why not say it out loud, this problem you call silly? Validate your fears. Mind you, you don't have to. But I think this in of itself is significant and worth unraveling. I'm going to say this next thing from a slightly different perspective. It's not fair to your parents that you've turned them into something that causes you enough distress that you're speaking about how much pressure it places you under. 

Now I have to add, some people thrive under this kind of arbitrary pressure. Some don't. If you're going to keep this close to the chest, you need to trhive with it, otherwise its toxic.
There are other unfortunate consequences of not resolving this, so do consider making peace with this aspect. You love your parents a lot, but this might also be emboldening your own pride.


Quote:Maybe some day, I’ll be able to show my books and feel good that my parents (and other close relations) are proud of me.
Yeah! If it's something you're working on then naturally you'll get there! Take out that 'maybe', talk like the winner you are. You'll get there someday.




Quote:Sometimes, it’s very good to have someone who has the guts to tell you you’re silly :)
So, just want to make sure that we don't make light of your worries. While in one hand they can be seen as silly, on the other hand, these are very real feelings. For someone who is caught in the middle of the worst times, it'll be hard to see the silliness. So what I want to make clear is that your feelings are very real. Don't underestimate the spirals they can send you on and always remember to look at the other hand.



Quote:By the way, what types of books do you write? 
A bunch! So, I started on Royal Road like two years ago with a story I didn't complete. I stopped and instead went straight to amazon and just churned out some romance novels to get a sense for how publishing worked. (I have no love for female-audience-focused-romance, but for learning amazon and self-publishing strategies, it's the most active market.) Anyway, after that, I started to do male-audience-focused test works.

On Royal Road, I'm testing out a LitRPG story.


Quote:And I’m totally stealing the idea of a dummy book :D That’s such a great idea!
I really hope it works for you! It just offers such a level of detachment! Ideally, with the dummy book, you want to be in a place when someone quotes it or mentions a line or something, you're like "Oh? What? I wrote that? Wow, haha, I can't believe those words fell out of my head. Wild time."

The dummy book should be a source of funny stories and anecdotes to help diffuse those certain social interactions.

Re: Any (in)secure writers out there that could give advice?

#12
Thanks again for your answer! You make some valid points (again) :) though, I think my parents would feel a litte hurt if I posed the question, so I think I’ll just have to deal with it. And thanks for naming me as a winner, haha. Now you’re the one emboldering my pride ;) though, in all seriousness, I have too much pride/sense of dignity anyway, and I’ve been trying to get away from that (in ways outside of writing, anyway—pride leaves you closed to so many things).

A winner in writing sounds like something to aspire to, though!

It’s so cool that you took the shot at publishing to see how it works! I did somewhat the same, for almost the same reason (cozy mysteries are the 2nd best selling genre on amazon—think Agatha Christie type murders solved by a female sleuth, usually with a cat in tow, in a small town, and a subgenre of choice; paranormal (witches are really big), culinary, crafts, and an actual genre called ”animals”). I probably would have gone for a romance one as well, if I had the patience for it. Romance isn’t my thing :P but I’ve tried my hand at very many different genres! And yes, no matter what people say, males and females are usually drawn to different things, so I hope it works out well for you :)

I’m also here with the same reason as you—writing LitRPG. It seems like just the place to try out a genre like that. I’ll check out your story tomorrow :D