Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#2
I hate when character deaths aren't meaningful. It just feels so cheap then. Resurrection can be done well if there's an actual impact on the story and it changed the characters in some meaningful way, but it's done poorly more often. 

I like tragedies but I think they're really hard to do well. There's a fine line between tragic and just depressing/unsatisfying that's hard to get right, I think. I would like to see more of them around though.  

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#3
I can understand that authors don't want to kill off their characters. they are meant to be liked and you want them to succeed. see their ups and downs etc. if someone dies then it is 99,9% planned from the start but if you do that then you don't develop them as nice as a normal character because you know he will die anyway. those throw-away characters always have an "off" feel to them and people notice that. so they aren't really stunned if average joe #3 gets run over because it is either expected or you don't care about him because he didn't get enough screentime to matter. if they get too much screen time then authors start to like them and don't want to kill them off.

Maybe it would just be best to have a dice lying next to you and if something big happens you make a chart with options and roll it. If the author doesn't know the dude is getting killed in the next chapter then it would make it more impactful.

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#5
I mean, I can definitely understand not wanting to kill your characters. You're invested in their stories, and all that. 

But at the same time, kill your babies. Sometimes it can be meaningful, sometimes it isn't. I find that I don't like it at first when a death is without meaning and seemingly random, but at the same time, that's life: sometimes people die in anti-climactic ways. Finding a balance between the two is probably best, to be honest. 

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#8
There are some really ridiculously tragic stories on this site, including one or two I just stopped reading because why would I do that to myself. (I want to go back in time and stop myself from reading As the world catches fire. Now I'm stuck wondering what happens after I dropped it and being unwilling to break my heart just to read the rest.)

That said, RR started as a site for lightnovels. Pleasant and easy to read stories, wish fulfillment and easy-to-process litRPG are what does best here. Heavy reads does make it to the trending list every now and then and I don't think they're particularly rare. Remember that this is a site aimed at episodic writing, with chapters released one at a time rather than as a whole book. Tragedy cliffhangers are just painful for people who aren't able to read the whole story because it hasn't been released yet. 

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#11
If you want tragedy I can tell you that literally all my stories end in tragedy. Granted some more than others, like for instance the two novels I'm writing right now are more bittersweet than they are tragic, but I wrote two stories on the Storyfire website(both I haven't finished) ends in a tragedy.  I got many others that end in tragedy, and I would really like to write them, but I'm already writing two novels at once so thats a no go for me. At least until I finish my current one in like, four to five years. 

But anyway if you want tragedy I have a decent selection with a short story as well that ends in tragedy. Just know I play the long game and the endings won't be released until like, years from now. I just hope RR stays online for that long, and considering how popular it is for webnovel readers, I doubt it'd shutdown anytime soon.

Now as for what happened to tragedies, I don't know. The last tragedy I read that was released in the 2000s was Cirque du Freak, which is a middle grade book series(at least until the later books when they become more YA than middle grade), and even then it ends more bittersweet. As for character deaths, I'd say that people calmed down with killing characters so many times after the Game of Thrones craze died down a bit and authors realized that killing off a character doesn't make them automatically a masterful writer. I personally see character deaths as chess pieces. Make the wrong move and the entire game is thrown. 

So yeah thats my answer really. Not really to easy to answer so I just answered with what I knew.

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#13
RR is big on wish fulfillment. And what are the biggest wishes of most people? To be awesome, to not be lonely (as in having a company of friends that would go through hell and back for one, not necessarily being ultra popular), to be loved by the gender one desires, to be successful, to be proven right, etc. 

A story being a tragedy or protagonist dying opposes this wish fulfillment. The wish doesn't get fulfilled, and the reader is disappointed because they didn't get from the story what they wanted. Even Zombie Apocalypse Stories appeal to this. Many characters die, and things are bleak, but somehow the MC and the important characters usually mange to live for another day and be badass.

And many readers want to escape from real life. The world has gotten bleaker, or at least many have gotten the perception that the world has gotten bleaker, social media is definitely responsible for that. Readers don't want to be reminded of that. They don't want a gray world with nuances that blur the notion of right and wrong. They want their bad guys who represent everything wrong with the world revealed to its naked, ugly core. They want bad guys who they can hate and who will lose in the end because their evil is wrong.

This is also a shifting cycle. Between 2002-16, it was the other way around. People had enough with self-righteousness. The world wanted to present itself as black and white, and when reality was complex. That gave rise to fiction that explored the gray. Now, it's the opposite. We're living in a complex world full of ambiguities, but many don't want that. They want to be the right ones, and the others to be wrong. And the right ones shall succeed, while the wrong ones don't. In real life, it's not like that.

Personally, I don't like this. I think fiction, and especially fantasy, are a mirror of reality. It allows us to convey complexity through our lenses without having to suffer real life consequences. In real life we say things like genocide and incest are wrong. In fiction, we can explore this from every angle and show sides that we can't in real life without doing these. Our world is full of nuances, and fiction allows us to reflect this without anyone real having to suffer.

The same with character deaths and tragedies. We are all flawed. Sometimes, we can overcome our flaws, sometimes we succeed besides or because of them, sometimes we fail because of them, and sometimes we aren't able to overcome them. Personally, I also believe that villains and antagonists have as much of a right to succeed as the heroes and protagonists. Why should all villains die, and all heroes win? Let some villains die, and some succeed, and have some winning heroes and some losing. Most stories are tragedies from the villain's perspective. There's seldom a true happily ever after, because the villains almost never get theirs. But they have as much of a right to happy ending as the heroes. 

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#15

YAK Wrote: I think fiction, and especially fantasy, are a mirror of reality. It allows us to convey complexity through our lenses without having to suffer real life consequences. In real life we say things like genocide and incest are wrong. In fiction, we can explore this from every angle and show sides that we can't in real life without doing these. Our world is full of nuances, and fiction allows us to reflect this without anyone real having to suffer.


I think this really hits the nail on the head about the point of writing for me. Writing in fantasy, sci-fi, anything really, allows you to convey messages, themes, and histories of the real world and analyze it in a way that you wouldn't normally be able to in a regular book about politics or philosophy. 

Re: What happened to tragidies and characters deaths.

#19
I'm not a huge fan of tragedy porn, but a little sadness and darkness sprinkled in to give a story some more emotional range and depth is usually a good thing. 

Having said this, the reason tragedy has become almost extinct here on this RR is some people have a giant throbbing hate boner for any sort of negative emotion-inducing turn in a story to the point that a web novel will get absolutely buried in half-star flame reviews the moment they take their narrative in that direction.