Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#21

Zogarth Wrote: I completely agree! Let us equate scientifically supported mental illnesses and someone who can't figure out what to write next, a mythical condition only afflicting writers, that magically gets fixed by actually HAVING to write.

I wouldn't do that, it could define writer's block as a blanket term, which could contradict your first definition.

Writer's block. Blanket term. DrakanThinking

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#22

OrenonawaSteevie Wrote: DrakanThinking Why am I getting offended by this topic, it's strange.
I mean this dude is just voicing his opinion, it's not like he is especially talking about me, but why do I feel so hurt by these comments, could it be... nvm it's just that period of the month, there are time where I can't tame my Karen self.


Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally. 
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,) 
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it. 

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#23

TheDungeonMother Wrote: Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally.
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,)
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it.

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.


The thing is, there is always going to be "that writer" and many more who fall into the broad, "Oh, that writer" category. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer who is active on writing forums, discords, and other communities is just learn to ignore them. There are a lot of them. For example:

-The college student who just finished their English/any writing degree and comes on a forum wanting to show how intelligent they are by trying too hard. They come off like a jackass to the rest of the community. The least noxious of them all because they'll be one of the better members when they stop welding their degree around to validate their opinions. 

-The elitist who thinks they are above the "rabble," but their work is all ego and no skill to go along with the ego. As much as they talk about being a good writer, they still have a great deal to learn. You can't tell them that. Such a thing requires them to stop looking down their nose.

-The "I'm working on my childhood story that I've been planning for 10 years" writer. These also like to use Tolkien for an example as an excuse for being unable to leave the world-building cycle. In reality, many of these folks just like building worlds. They've not gotten to the point of acceptance yet. 

-The aspiring writer who reads every "how to write" book out there, watched all the Ted Talks, listens to all the podcasts, and studies them thinking it's all going to make them ready to write that best-seller. Some even run back to studying when they realize they can't write a coherent paragraph.

-The hopeful writer that no matter how much you tell them the realities of being a novelist, temper their expectations, set realistic goals, they believe they'll luck out and become the next J.K. Rowlings.

-The aspiring writer who thinks they are ready to write their magnum opus and can't handle their noob writing skills. They lament to the community they can't write in the same quality as a traditional published book. Even more annoying when you ask them, how many novels they've written, they tell you none. They've never written a thing in their life. These particularly bother me more than I like to admit.

-The "I like the thought of writing" inspiring writers. This is more or less the one you are talking about. They always have a great idea. It always has so much depth. The greatest story ever known if only they could just write it. There is always an excuse why they haven't and they are always on the writing community. Time that could be spent bragging and telling others about their great nonexistent story could be spent on actual writing.

-The "I need motivation and inspiration to write" writer. They will talk about how they don't know where to find them when in reality, they just lack discipline. Sometimes they ignore the wisdom of, "set aside time to write everyday until you build a habit," for more inspirational things they can add to Pinterest.

I'm sure this list can go on. But I need to stop. I actually need to get some work done. My point is, as a writer, you are better off just letting them be, don't get salty, many of these tend to go away, get chased out, mellow out, or actually learn someothing. The best you can do is just worry about your writing and less about other writers.

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#24

L.J.Anders Wrote:
TheDungeonMother Wrote: Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally.
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,)
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it.

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.


The thing is, there is always going to be "that writer" and many more who fall into the broad, "Oh, that writer" category. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer who is active on writing forums, discords, and other communities is just learn to ignore them. There are a lot of them. For example:

-The college student who just finished their English/any writing degree and comes on a forum wanting to show how intelligent they are by trying too hard. They come off like a jackass to the rest of the community. The least noxious of them all because they'll be one of the better members when they stop welding their degree around to validate their opinions. 

-The elitist who thinks they are above the "rabble," but their work is all ego and no skill to go along with the ego. As much as they talk about being a good writer, they still have a great deal to learn. You can't tell them that. Such a thing requires them to stop looking down their nose.

-The "I'm working on my childhood story that I've been planning for 10 years" writer. These also like to use Tolkien for an example as an excuse for being unable to leave the world-building cycle. In reality, many of these folks just like building worlds. They've not gotten to the point of acceptance yet. 

-The aspiring writer who reads every "how to write" book out there, watched all the Ted Talks, listens to all the podcasts, and studies them thinking it's all going to make them ready to write that best-seller. Some even run back to studying when they realize they can't write a coherent paragraph.

-The hopeful writer that no matter how much you tell them the realities of being a novelist, temper their expectations, set realistic goals, they believe they'll luck out and become the next J.K. Rowlings.

-The aspiring writer who thinks they are ready to write their magnum opus and can't handle their noob writing skills. They lament to the community they can't write in the same quality as a transitional published book. Even more annoying when you ask them, how many novels they've written, they tell you none. They've never written a thing in their life. These particularly bother me more than I like to admit.

-The "I like the thought of writing" inspiring writers. This is more or less the one you are talking about. They always have a great idea. It always has so much depth. The greatest story ever known if only they could just write it. There is always an excuse why they haven't and they are always on the writing community. Time that could be spent bragging and telling others about their great nonexistent story could be spent on actual writing.

-The "I need motivation and inspiration to writer" writer. They will talk about how they don't know where to find them when in reality, they just lack discipline. Sometimes they ignore the wisdom of, "set aside time to write everyday until you build a habit," for more inspirational things they can add to Pinterest.

I'm sure this list can go on. But I need to stop. I actually need to get some work done. My point is, as a writer, you are better off just letting them be, don't get salty, many of these tend to go away, get chased out, mellow out, or actually learn someothing. The best you can do is just worry about your writing and less about other writers.



DrakanPopcorn

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#25

Weavervale Wrote:
L.J.Anders Wrote:
TheDungeonMother Wrote: Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally.
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,)
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it.

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.


The thing is, there is always going to be "that writer" and many more who fall into the broad, "Oh, that writer" category. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer who is active on writing forums, discords, and other communities is just learn to ignore them. There are a lot of them. For example:

-The college student who just finished their English/any writing degree and comes on a forum wanting to show how intelligent they are by trying too hard. They come off like a jackass to the rest of the community. The least noxious of them all because they'll be one of the better members when they stop welding their degree around to validate their opinions. 

-The elitist who thinks they are above the "rabble," but their work is all ego and no skill to go along with the ego. As much as they talk about being a good writer, they still have a great deal to learn. You can't tell them that. Such a thing requires them to stop looking down their nose.

-The "I'm working on my childhood story that I've been planning for 10 years" writer. These also like to use Tolkien for an example as an excuse for being unable to leave the world-building cycle. In reality, many of these folks just like building worlds. They've not gotten to the point of acceptance yet. 

-The aspiring writer who reads every "how to write" book out there, watched all the Ted Talks, listens to all the podcasts, and studies them thinking it's all going to make them ready to write that best-seller. Some even run back to studying when they realize they can't write a coherent paragraph.

-The hopeful writer that no matter how much you tell them the realities of being a novelist, temper their expectations, set realistic goals, they believe they'll luck out and become the next J.K. Rowlings.

-The aspiring writer who thinks they are ready to write their magnum opus and can't handle their noob writing skills. They lament to the community they can't write in the same quality as a transitional published book. Even more annoying when you ask them, how many novels they've written, they tell you none. They've never written a thing in their life. These particularly bother me more than I like to admit.

-The "I like the thought of writing" inspiring writers. This is more or less the one you are talking about. They always have a great idea. It always has so much depth. The greatest story ever known if only they could just write it. There is always an excuse why they haven't and they are always on the writing community. Time that could be spent bragging and telling others about their great nonexistent story could be spent on actual writing.

-The "I need motivation and inspiration to writer" writer. They will talk about how they don't know where to find them when in reality, they just lack discipline. Sometimes they ignore the wisdom of, "set aside time to write everyday until you build a habit," for more inspirational things they can add to Pinterest.

I'm sure this list can go on. But I need to stop. I actually need to get some work done. My point is, as a writer, you are better off just letting them be, don't get salty, many of these tend to go away, get chased out, mellow out, or actually learn someothing. The best you can do is just worry about your writing and less about other writers.



DrakanPopcorn
DrakanPopcorn

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#26

OrenonawaSteevie Wrote:
Weavervale Wrote:
L.J.Anders Wrote:
TheDungeonMother Wrote: Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally.
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,)
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it.

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.


The thing is, there is always going to be "that writer" and many more who fall into the broad, "Oh, that writer" category. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer who is active on writing forums, discords, and other communities is just learn to ignore them. There are a lot of them. For example:

-The college student who just finished their English/any writing degree and comes on a forum wanting to show how intelligent they are by trying too hard. They come off like a jackass to the rest of the community. The least noxious of them all because they'll be one of the better members when they stop welding their degree around to validate their opinions. 

-The elitist who thinks they are above the "rabble," but their work is all ego and no skill to go along with the ego. As much as they talk about being a good writer, they still have a great deal to learn. You can't tell them that. Such a thing requires them to stop looking down their nose.

-The "I'm working on my childhood story that I've been planning for 10 years" writer. These also like to use Tolkien for an example as an excuse for being unable to leave the world-building cycle. In reality, many of these folks just like building worlds. They've not gotten to the point of acceptance yet. 

-The aspiring writer who reads every "how to write" book out there, watched all the Ted Talks, listens to all the podcasts, and studies them thinking it's all going to make them ready to write that best-seller. Some even run back to studying when they realize they can't write a coherent paragraph.

-The hopeful writer that no matter how much you tell them the realities of being a novelist, temper their expectations, set realistic goals, they believe they'll luck out and become the next J.K. Rowlings.

-The aspiring writer who thinks they are ready to write their magnum opus and can't handle their noob writing skills. They lament to the community they can't write in the same quality as a transitional published book. Even more annoying when you ask them, how many novels they've written, they tell you none. They've never written a thing in their life. These particularly bother me more than I like to admit.

-The "I like the thought of writing" inspiring writers. This is more or less the one you are talking about. They always have a great idea. It always has so much depth. The greatest story ever known if only they could just write it. There is always an excuse why they haven't and they are always on the writing community. Time that could be spent bragging and telling others about their great nonexistent story could be spent on actual writing.

-The "I need motivation and inspiration to writer" writer. They will talk about how they don't know where to find them when in reality, they just lack discipline. Sometimes they ignore the wisdom of, "set aside time to write everyday until you build a habit," for more inspirational things they can add to Pinterest.

I'm sure this list can go on. But I need to stop. I actually need to get some work done. My point is, as a writer, you are better off just letting them be, don't get salty, many of these tend to go away, get chased out, mellow out, or actually learn someothing. The best you can do is just worry about your writing and less about other writers.



DrakanPopcorn
DrakanPopcorn
peoeating

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#27

Edge Wrote:
OrenonawaSteevie Wrote:
Weavervale Wrote:
L.J.Anders Wrote:
TheDungeonMother Wrote: Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally.
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,)
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it.

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.


The thing is, there is always going to be "that writer" and many more who fall into the broad, "Oh, that writer" category. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer who is active on writing forums, discords, and other communities is just learn to ignore them. There are a lot of them. For example:

-The college student who just finished their English/any writing degree and comes on a forum wanting to show how intelligent they are by trying too hard. They come off like a jackass to the rest of the community. The least noxious of them all because they'll be one of the better members when they stop welding their degree around to validate their opinions. 

-The elitist who thinks they are above the "rabble," but their work is all ego and no skill to go along with the ego. As much as they talk about being a good writer, they still have a great deal to learn. You can't tell them that. Such a thing requires them to stop looking down their nose.

-The "I'm working on my childhood story that I've been planning for 10 years" writer. These also like to use Tolkien for an example as an excuse for being unable to leave the world-building cycle. In reality, many of these folks just like building worlds. They've not gotten to the point of acceptance yet. 

-The aspiring writer who reads every "how to write" book out there, watched all the Ted Talks, listens to all the podcasts, and studies them thinking it's all going to make them ready to write that best-seller. Some even run back to studying when they realize they can't write a coherent paragraph.

-The hopeful writer that no matter how much you tell them the realities of being a novelist, temper their expectations, set realistic goals, they believe they'll luck out and become the next J.K. Rowlings.

-The aspiring writer who thinks they are ready to write their magnum opus and can't handle their noob writing skills. They lament to the community they can't write in the same quality as a transitional published book. Even more annoying when you ask them, how many novels they've written, they tell you none. They've never written a thing in their life. These particularly bother me more than I like to admit.

-The "I like the thought of writing" inspiring writers. This is more or less the one you are talking about. They always have a great idea. It always has so much depth. The greatest story ever known if only they could just write it. There is always an excuse why they haven't and they are always on the writing community. Time that could be spent bragging and telling others about their great nonexistent story could be spent on actual writing.

-The "I need motivation and inspiration to writer" writer. They will talk about how they don't know where to find them when in reality, they just lack discipline. Sometimes they ignore the wisdom of, "set aside time to write everyday until you build a habit," for more inspirational things they can add to Pinterest.

I'm sure this list can go on. But I need to stop. I actually need to get some work done. My point is, as a writer, you are better off just letting them be, don't get salty, many of these tend to go away, get chased out, mellow out, or actually learn someothing. The best you can do is just worry about your writing and less about other writers.



DrakanPopcorn
DrakanPopcorn
peoeating
DrakanPopcorn the true watchers eat popcorn

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#28

DrBuller Wrote:
Edge Wrote:
OrenonawaSteevie Wrote:
Weavervale Wrote:
L.J.Anders Wrote:
TheDungeonMother Wrote: Right I'm not calling anyone out. Not intentionally.
I was just super happy about how many views my stories were getting and going on about it in the discord I'm apart of and there was this person (who has notably buried all my posts about my artwork or writing. Once well buried they post and gloat about their own artwork so maybe I'm just salty about that,)
This person just immediately derailed the conversation to talk about how good of a writer they are when they write but it's so hard and they just go on about how great their allegory and symbolism is and it's all accidental but it's just so hard to write and if they could just sit down and write they'd be the best at it.

They dropped it completely once the celebratory posts about my view count were well buried under her half pity party/half self-congratulatory boasting. Just rubbed me the wrong way and it's not an isolated incident so it just makes me a little hesitant to actually talk to other writers.


The thing is, there is always going to be "that writer" and many more who fall into the broad, "Oh, that writer" category. The best thing you can do for yourself as a writer who is active on writing forums, discords, and other communities is just learn to ignore them. There are a lot of them. For example:

-The college student who just finished their English/any writing degree and comes on a forum wanting to show how intelligent they are by trying too hard. They come off like a jackass to the rest of the community. The least noxious of them all because they'll be one of the better members when they stop welding their degree around to validate their opinions. 

-The elitist who thinks they are above the "rabble," but their work is all ego and no skill to go along with the ego. As much as they talk about being a good writer, they still have a great deal to learn. You can't tell them that. Such a thing requires them to stop looking down their nose.

-The "I'm working on my childhood story that I've been planning for 10 years" writer. These also like to use Tolkien for an example as an excuse for being unable to leave the world-building cycle. In reality, many of these folks just like building worlds. They've not gotten to the point of acceptance yet. 

-The aspiring writer who reads every "how to write" book out there, watched all the Ted Talks, listens to all the podcasts, and studies them thinking it's all going to make them ready to write that best-seller. Some even run back to studying when they realize they can't write a coherent paragraph.

-The hopeful writer that no matter how much you tell them the realities of being a novelist, temper their expectations, set realistic goals, they believe they'll luck out and become the next J.K. Rowlings.

-The aspiring writer who thinks they are ready to write their magnum opus and can't handle their noob writing skills. They lament to the community they can't write in the same quality as a transitional published book. Even more annoying when you ask them, how many novels they've written, they tell you none. They've never written a thing in their life. These particularly bother me more than I like to admit.

-The "I like the thought of writing" inspiring writers. This is more or less the one you are talking about. They always have a great idea. It always has so much depth. The greatest story ever known if only they could just write it. There is always an excuse why they haven't and they are always on the writing community. Time that could be spent bragging and telling others about their great nonexistent story could be spent on actual writing.

-The "I need motivation and inspiration to writer" writer. They will talk about how they don't know where to find them when in reality, they just lack discipline. Sometimes they ignore the wisdom of, "set aside time to write everyday until you build a habit," for more inspirational things they can add to Pinterest.

I'm sure this list can go on. But I need to stop. I actually need to get some work done. My point is, as a writer, you are better off just letting them be, don't get salty, many of these tend to go away, get chased out, mellow out, or actually learn someothing. The best you can do is just worry about your writing and less about other writers.



DrakanPopcorn
DrakanPopcorn
peoeating
DrakanPopcorn the true watchers eat popcorn
Cookies for life.

peoeating

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#36
I adore pretentious asshole writers who can’t actually write. Why? Because they make me feel incredibly superior and I don’t even have to feel bad about it because they’re jerks.

You know the ones. The ones who are just SO impressed with themselves, because they’re writers. And why are they writers? So you’ll be impressed with them, of course. But actual writing…I mean, you know. They’re totally working on the Next Great American Novel, but that takes time, right? And lots of angst and drinking and complaining about how hard writing is. 

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#37
I think it's the tension between writing when you feel like it and writing to keep up with a schedule. 

Like, let me put it this way. I sometimes go through bursts of creativity where tens of thousands of words just fall out of my hands every day. During those periods, I write a whole lot, plan out my plots a whole lot, and it all seems incredibly easy and very satisfying. 

However, those times don't last forever. And when it's done, at least in my experience, you aren't left with a finished work. You're left with a work that you wrote TONS of under those highly motivated periods, but which isn't finished. What's left for you, then, is to use the groundwork you laid during your highly motivated periods, and push yourself across the finish line. 

And the reality is, it can feel like a chore - even more so when you're pushing yourself to meet a schedule of released updates, and, I'm sure, even MORE so than that when your writing is your source of income. I don't rely on writing for income; at the end of the day if I'm feeling particularly unmotivated, it's not a big deal if I miss a self-imposed deadline or two. Or three. But it's much more serious for people who rely on their fans for income and have some sort of obligation to them. 

And it can be kind of depressing. Because you remember the times when writing came so easily to you, and now it feels like it's a chore that you're doing out of guilt. You worry if those good times will ever return. Maybe you lost your touch. And doesn't it suck that this thing you loved to do now feels like such a burden? And I think this is where the writer's block comes in; when you begin to question why the hell you're even doing this if it's no longer fun. 

So I can definitely get the love-hate relationship; loving to write, especially during those good times, and feeling the burden of it when the muse takes a vacation for a bit but you still have to haul something across the finish line. I find what keeps me motivated during those latter times is thinking about how cool the big payoff scenes will be, and how great it will be to take a guilt-free break from writing once you're finished. 

And I think the reason people talk about the hard times so much is because they're looking for reassurance; they want to know that it happens to lots of people, that it's common among writers to go through these lows, that it doesn't necessarily mean they've lost their creativity or mojo or whatever. People don't talk about the good times as much because, well, they don't need to, and it might come across as bragging anyway; even just mentioning above how productive I can be during the good times made me feel a little crass. So I would say don't feel jaded because people perhaps mope a little bit about their struggles, they're just looking for a common thread of humanity. 

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#38

Zogarth Wrote: Writer's block is just a fancy word for procrastination made up by people who don't wanna admit they have been lazing around a bit too much.

Also, you really need to find a better writer group to talk to. I am in plenty and while complaints are aplenty, it is rarely about writing itself, but rather the hardships of dealing with actually publishing the book.

No. I have writer's block for my main novel but wrote two chapters of my joke novel yesterday and I'm in the middle of drafting the outline for my new novel I didn't start writing yet.

However, can't get to writing my main novel still. That's because the tone of the incoming chapters is going to be rather serious, and I have an emotional block from writing serious stuff now, so I spent the time writing other genres instead. How can this be procrastination if I'm working?

.....creative process is a serious and emotionally taxing thing. Some people get burned out faster than others. Also writing certain genres such as tragedy and drama can lead to such burnout and empty-headed feeling faster than writing a parody or action-adventure. 

And then there is also a matter of author's individual circumstances such as their personality and real-life issues that affect them.

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#39

TheDungeonMother Wrote: I don't know what it is and I KNOW that not every writer is like this... But I'm so tired of talking to people who are 'writers' who lament they love writing and they do lots of writing but can't write or have had writers block for gods know how long. 

It's exhausting to have someone try and connect with me over writing but then just roll their eyes like a dark age noble about how hard it is and how they could absolutely write and have so many great ideas if only it wasn't so hard!

Writing is hard. Making a consistent story and writing every day is hard. I find it enjoyable and fun, (a chore somedays, sure) and someone lamenting to me as if it's the hardest thing in the world.

I don't know what authors you're talking to. Not a single one of my author friends said that writing is hard. I personally find the reverse - coming up with great ideas for new chapters can be a bit tough, but the writing itself is super easy once I come up with a funny hook.

Now... drawing art for every chapter, that's super tough. :p

Re: Talking to writers has made me jaded

#40



powered_by_coffee Wrote: I don't know what authors you're talking to. Not a single one of my author friends said that writing is hard. I personally find the reverse - coming up with great ideas for new chapters can be a bit tough, but the writing itself is super easy once I come up with a funny hook.



I didn't say AUTHORS
I said writers. Big difference. I consider myself a writer until I have personally made some kind of money from a book I've written. That's my personal benchmark and it's different for everyone. I'm just tired of talking to people who think everything they write is golden and a best seller if only they could write it. It just breaks my brain because I am putting in the work and it feels a little disrespectful I guess? Who knows. I might just be way off base.