Plot holes in your writing?

#1
Is there a plot hole in your writing that is so bad that it destroys a lot of other things in your story. I just had to push back my latest chapter by a week cause as I was proofreading, I discovered a plot hole I accidentally put in and now have to rewrite nearly half of it and figure out what to replace it with. I just don't want to feel like I'm the only that has done this.

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#3
Omg yes. All the time. I hate it. 

If I see the plot holes reader will see it too. I'm hoping to keep track of my progress with my own excel spreadsheet of info and I plot out the arcs well in advance 

It also helps to have overarching goals for each major sequence in your story to work towards. But I haven't posted yet so maybe we will see

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#8
I think I've managed to avoid any major plot holes.

I planned out the major story beats in advance, but I leave the little details until I'm actually writing, so I don't have to define them until I need them. And then I make sure everything I write after that point conforms to the things that have been defined so far.

That leaves me some flexibility in changing events as I go, so I don't end up with plot holes.

There have been a few little things, most of which I caught and fixed before actually writing them--like, "Hmm, a group of peasant bandits isn't going to attempt an ambush against a large, heavily armed and armored group. Guess I need to rethink this sequence."

Also, since there are so many different factions, I've had to tweak some of their reasoning/justification for what they do, in order to keep all the factions and storylines in sync, and to make sure they make sense.

But I'm not aware of any real plot holes making it into the final story itself.

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#10
Oh yeah. Well, no. Sort of.

The main series I'm working on has time travel in it. The nature of the time travel birthed out of the general story beats of the story I wanted to tell. The problem is that the time travel in my story was very inconsistent.

Good thing this was all in the outlining phase. I managed to get around it......by creating my own time travel rules that are dependent on how big the change actually is.

The continuing problem is that my story isn't a time travel story, but the time travel plot hangs like a shadow over other arcs. So I had to work those arcs around being able to make sense in two different timelines AND having a reason for there to be a change in how events happen, even though those arcs having nothing to do with the time travel plot.

My best advice is to avoid time travel stories unless you're doing a wacky teen comedy about a boy who accidentally goes back to the past and stops his parents from meeting.

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#12
Plot holes are definitely something that will happen in your writing, there's just no avoiding it.

When I was writing Angel of the Red Sun, the difference between Draft 1 and Draft 8 (or 9? whichever one I'm on when I do my final pass before uploading) was astounding. Plotlines that didn't go somewhere, little mentions of things that break continuity, the works. The unfortunate truth is that as a writer you have to possess both the ability to think ahead and avoid plotholes to the best of your ability, or be able to roll with the punches.

My other book, Swagmaster Ted, gets a second draft and that's it (it's also written on a serialized basis). So naturally, it lends itself well to plotholes. Luckily, the ridiculous factor of the book also lends itself well to easily explaining--if not leaning in--to those plotholes.

Everything depends on how you want your work presented as a writer, and I will be the first to say that plotholes are garish and catch the eye and are very, very, obvious to some. Like a mole on someone's face. But you what? Moles can be pretty damn cute too. It's all a matter of perspective and how you want to come at it.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have a chapter of Swagmaster Ted to write and fill with more potholes that a residential street in the middle of Portland.

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#14

O_Weaver Wrote: I wrote something once about a group of people stuck in a dungeon. I wrote 10 chapters, got to an actual combat sequence and then realized I'd forgotten to give any of them weapons... I don't think anyone would willingly go into a dungeon while unarmed so... yea... was re-write time.

DrakanLaugh
No disrespect but that has to be the funniest thing I've heard yet. 

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#15

Gryphon10 Wrote:
O_Weaver Wrote: I wrote something once about a group of people stuck in a dungeon. I wrote 10 chapters, got to an actual combat sequence and then realized I'd forgotten to give any of them weapons... I don't think anyone would willingly go into a dungeon while unarmed so... yea... was re-write time.

DrakanLaugh
No disrespect but that has to be the funniest thing I've heard yet.
Maybe the real weapons were the friends we made along the way.

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#16

Zeepolian Wrote:
Gryphon10 Wrote:
O_Weaver Wrote: I wrote something once about a group of people stuck in a dungeon. I wrote 10 chapters, got to an actual combat sequence and then realized I'd forgotten to give any of them weapons... I don't think anyone would willingly go into a dungeon while unarmed so... yea... was re-write time.

DrakanLaugh
No disrespect but that has to be the funniest thing I've heard yet.
Maybe the real weapons were the friends we made along the way.


Power of friendship, plot armor, and vague descriptions

DrakanGlasses

Re: Plot holes in your writing?

#18
Yes, and since I write everything out beforehand, I can catch a lot of them given I read through stories multiple times. I can't truly remember anything glaring. Small plotholes don't really bother me because often times a sentence or a paragraph can patch it.

What bothers me are the ones where I write a story and the premise the main plot is a plot hole. Trying to fix that means I have to fix multiple chapters and possibly remove them. This is why I don't post as I write and why I stopped being a pantser. I wanted tighter stories where if I have to fix something, it's not story breaking and ends up being a complete structural failure. Those are hard to fix because the entire story is ruined.