Re: Do all stories read like games on this site?

#62

Edge Wrote: I feel like this thread derailed far from its original purpose. 😐

It has gained life and direction of its own and we should love and support its decision. :) 

(That said, I was never a huge fan of the hero's journey. Great if it works for people, I just found it to feel very rigid. The plot embryo and other structures just feels more fluid to me, and shows that it's not the only way to go. The hero's journey was never created to be a plotting device for authors, it's originally a tool for plot analysis which isn't the same.)

Re: Do all stories read like games on this site?

#66

Haust Wrote:
1moreindakitchen Wrote:
Haust Wrote:
Edge Wrote: I feel like this thread derailed far from its original purpose. 😐

It has gained life and direction of its own and we should love and support its decision. :)

As long as it doesn't kill its creator, all is fine I'd say.

COnsidering the creators post count, I say we might be past that point.

Nothing like having a lurker finally make an account so they can have a question, and then burying them under pages of analysis. :D

Re: Do all stories read like games on this site?

#67

Haust Wrote: It has gained life and direction of its own and we should love and support its decision. :) 

(That said, I was never a huge fan of the hero's journey. Great if it works for people, I just found it to feel very rigid. The plot embryo and other structures just feels more fluid to me, and shows that it's not the only way to go. The hero's journey was never created to be a plotting device for authors, it's originally a tool for plot analysis which isn't the same.)

I think I have the same opinion with that. I suppose the mixup probably comes in, where for the plot analysis, it is evaluating the steps. I believe those are the terms. Anyway, far too often, I see others directly translate it, and the story just becomes bland. That is just me though.

Re: Do all stories read like games on this site?

#71

Genuine55 Wrote:
TenThousandSuns Wrote: LitRPGs as a setting could simply be fantasy novels and work just fine. Dragon Eye Moons, Vainquer, etc are prominent examples of this. Even the famously once crunchy and now stale Delve actually ignores the numbers.

In fact ironically given the majority of the complaints in this thread the more meaningless your numbers the better your story does, on average.



That's kind of my point. The mechanics of good story telling isn't about the numbers. It's not about the country where the story is set, either. There's a rhythm and flow to a good story, and how you dress it up is only a miniscule part of that. It's just that there's a trap inherent in the litRPG setting - those numbers can make it feel like you have a story when in reality you just have a story fragment. It might be a fragment made up of millions of words, but it's still just a fragment. Maybe this is changing the subject too much, but this is almost the same problem with a lot of Superman stories too - although Superman tends to lack different portions of the journey. 

It's not an inherent problem with the genre - there's no reason you can't have a full and satisfying litRPG story. There are also lots of non-litRPG stories that fail for the same reasons. It's just that here I've noticed that there's a disproportionate percentage of litRPGs stories with the problem.

I think maybe you are just midunderstanding the original purpose of LitRPGs. And apparently avoided the very similar fight about worldbuilding stories a decade ago. Different types of prose writing have different purposes. Would you say that a science grant proposal is missing the important values of good stories? There is prose writing that focuses on plot, that focuses on character development, that focuses on a cool scientific theory and the implications, that explores politics or sociology, about exploring a world like a travelogue. Etc.


The numbers aren't a distraction from the story they are the purpose of the writing. Not all writing tries to achieve the same things whether we are talking about grant proposals or travelogues or w/e.

Exploring a fun game system and thinking about what class or talents or skills you'd have and perhaps how you'd min-max the game system if you are into that is the purpose of LitRPGs. I mean playing gamebooks back in the day was probably not your thing and that is fair. But it isn't a "problem".