Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#2
I like the premise more than the executions in most cases.

I'm a gamer. Getting taken to an alternate world where my power is based on game logic sounds pretty dang cool. It's a magic system that needs little explanation to anyone who is a gamer and there are a lot of interesting things that can be done with that.

In practice, I'm not really a fan of most litrpg, especially those that claim to be an MMO system because in 99.9% of those stories, the authors don't actually consider balance between all player characters, they just give their main cast broken strong abilities without consideration for the other players in their story's world and that's off-putting to me. IMHO, litrpg is under stricter scrutiny when it comes to magic system balance than other fantasy genres because balance is a hallmark feature of an MMO.

Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#3
*Throws bone over fence*  DrakanPotato


I personally enjoy them as they have a strict familiarity for any older person who grew up with TTPRGs like D&D or games that copied it like Final Fantasy. It's a simple concept for most and they immediately get acclimated, it is also possibly a nostalgia hit when they see similar systems. 

However, as Tucker stated, I am not a fan of all the LitRPG I read, due to the fact they often are either self-insert or follow an ideal/fetish of the author and blend in concepts I don't find appealing like Harems without substance or children who can destroy the universe without effort.

Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#4
I tend to think that its mostly a cheap dopamine thing. Not to dunk on the well crafter LitRPG's out there, but at its most basic level, a LitRPG immediately gives you a framework to present 'growth' and 'progression' without the need to develop character, setting or any heavy lifting.

A lot of good LitRPG's use the system as a framework to push character and build up the world, but I think it mostly acts as a crutch. On top of that, it's very comfortable for a reader and easy to get into due to the clear progression and known scope of whatever system is being used.

Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#5

scost Wrote: I tend to think that its mostly a cheap dopamine thing. Not to dunk on the well crafter LitRPG's out there, but at its most basic level, a LitRPG immediately gives you a framework to present 'growth' and 'progression' without the need to develop character, setting or any heavy lifting.

A lot of good LitRPG's use the system as a framework to push character and build up the world, but I think it mostly acts as a crutch. On top of that, it's very comfortable for a reader and easy to get into due to the clear progression and known scope of whatever system is being used.


This about sums up my thoughts too. In a lot of ways, litRPGs are like fanfiction. They both rely on intertextuality. Harry Potter fanfiction is easy to get into if you've read the books and seen the movies, and this allows the plot to progress quickly without any descriptions, worldbuilding, or explanations. Similarly, litRPGs are easy to get into if you've played old-school RPGs, MMOs, etc. You just "get it" because you know what leveling up and building a character feels like. 

Of course, you could argue this is true about all fiction, especially fantasy. Even simple ideas like secondary worlds or hard magic systems rely on other works to build ther foundations. However, I'd say litRPGs and fanfiction rely much more on external context. If you were to give my grandmother her first xianxia story, she might be a little confused, but she'd figure things out eventually. But if gave her a litRPG, she'd probably be as lost as someone reading a HP fanfiction who's never read or seen Harry Potter.

But for readers who do have the context, this reliance on external sources makes litRPGs extremely easy to binge read.

Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#6
We've had this thread before more than once, so searching the forum would be an easy way to get more answers to this.

Me, I like how game worlds are more fair than reality, and putting in the work every day really might get you up into the realms of the rich and powerful.  Injuries are less likely to have permanent affects, skills probably don't decay if you don't practice them constantly, you probably can learn some kind of magic, monsters may have prevented urban sprawl, and there probably isn't law enforcement scrutinizing you out in the wilderness or in dungeons.  It's a great environment for self-improvement and self-actualization, plus performative living can shape your body to fit your inner self (to some extant, maybe you actually have to pay a mage if you want a permanent makeover).

Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#8
I like the feeling of progression. It's quite cool seeing the words saying you have finally evolved, kinda like a hallmark of your progression, versus other stories where it isn't as clear cut. However, I do agree that it is a crutch for the setting, and I do enjoy stories without the system. For example, most apocalypses novels here on RR tend to be System Apocalypse, but there's a new story by Blaise Corvin where the apocalypse wasn't a litrpg and was most like a fantasy world, here.

Re: What, specifically, do you like about LitRPG’s?

#9
I'm not really a fan of it to be honest. But, it can be done well by a competent author.

I think I first became aware of the concept in light novels; 'Rising of the Shield Hero', 'Overlords, and even 'Konosuba' all have RPG elements. I like most of these stories as they don't really revolve around those elements, it's just part of the story. And some, like 'Overlord' actually have a good reason for including it.

What kills me is that a lot of LitRPG stories (or the 'system' genre) are about the game or system elements and not the characters and plot. Or at least it can feel that way sometimes.

Big shout out to 'The Primal Hunter' though. Even though I actively try to stay away from most LitRPG, that one sucked me in.