Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#1
Recently, I noticed why two of my stories were considered 'too fast-paced' because of a person's video review of my first chapter(they are still doing them in the review forums). Roughly what they said is that 'many beginners try to rush through their story to get to the parts they feel most comfortable with.'

And to any beginners, I'd agree with this statement. My primary advice is don't feel rushed. While you might think at first that readers need you to get to the juicy fights or big events, if you rush the story to get to that point, it won't help. Make sure you leave time for the readers to understand and bond with the characters. If there's a scene you aren't sure will be interesting and want to delete, think about what use it is. Making a scene drag on too long isn't great, of course, but its better to give readers important information, so don't feel pressured into not making a scene because you think it will 'bore' readers. 
A story with too fast pacing will confuse readers and make the story difficult to follow.

I hope this was useful to someone! Many issue's with beginner's writing comes from the psyche, and if a writer can take a step back and write a story without feeling pressure to make everything follow a code, they'll see that many more things don't need to.

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#2

Sleepingdragoon Wrote: Recently, I noticed why two of my stories were considered 'too fast-paced' because of a person's video review of my first chapter(they are still doing them in the review forums). Roughly what they said is that 'many beginners try to rush through their story to get to the parts they feel most comfortable with.

And to any beginners, I'd agree with this statement. My primary advice is don't feel rushed. While you might think at first that readers need you to get to the juicy fights or big events, if you rush the story to get to that point, it won't help. Make sure you leave time for the readers to understand and bond with the characters. If there's a scene you aren't sure will be interesting and want to delete, think about what use it is. Making a scene drag on too long isn't great, of course, but its better to give readers important information, so don't feel pressured into not making a scene because you think it will 'bore' readers. 
A story with too fast pacing will confuse readers and make the story difficult to follow.

I hope this was useful to someone! Many issue's with beginner's writing comes from the psyche, and if a writer can take a step back and write a story without feeling pressure to make everything follow a code, they'll see that many more things don't need to.

The reviewer is right. Actually, that’s one reason for so many bad stories out there. A lot of writers tend to rush, and not take their time to expand. Not saying your own is, haven’t read it, so I cannot comment on that specifically. Generally speaking, take your time and steadily make your way through.

And you’re right again, readers can wait. They’ll complain either way, but at least if they make it further in, they will understand why it took time. Always consider what scene you are writing, since each scene should serve a purpose. Whether it is sooner or later.

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#3
If you find yourself rushing to get to certain scenes, why not write the scenes you're excited about, then go back and write all the other scenes that need to take place before them? That way, you've got a target to build up to, and you're not distracted by how much you wish you could be writing the exciting scenes.

It doesn't help with wanting to rush to show those scenes to readers, but ... the readers don't know about those scenes yet, or at least they don't know how exciting they are. They're not the ones who are in a rush.

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#4

IvyVeritas Wrote: If you find yourself rushing to get to certain scenes, why not write the scenes you're excited about, then go back and write all the other scenes that need to take place before them? That way, you've got a target to build up to, and you're not distracted by how much you wish you could be writing the exciting scenes.

This can cause an issue. Since, even with the best plan, the flow of those connecting points can change. Hence, if you write those scenes first, then go back and do the rest. You will likely end up writing the later scenes again either way. It is better to plan it out, and take your time getting to each and every part. 

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#5

Edge Wrote: This can cause an issue. Since, even with the best plan, then flow of those connecting points can change. Hence, if you write those scenes first, then go back and do the rest. You will likely end up writing the later scenes again either way. It is better to plan it out, and take your time getting to each and every part.



Rewriting a scene isn't really a problem. I do it all the time. It can be helpful to come at it with two different perspectives, and to understand how your perspective has changed--and to make sure your new perspective hasn't lost sight of any important plot lines that you want to keep from the original version.

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#7

IvyVeritas Wrote: If you find yourself rushing to get to certain scenes, why not write the scenes you're excited about, then go back and write all the other scenes that need to take place before them? That way, you've got a target to build up to, and you're not distracted by how much you wish you could be writing the exciting scenes.

It doesn't help with wanting to rush to show those scenes to readers, but ... the readers don't know about those scenes yet, or at least they don't know how exciting they are. They're not the ones who are in a rush.



All the points you all listed are really good points. 
Though, not every writer will benefit from that strategy, since writing styles vary drastically.

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#10
I can understand that, wanting people to know of your favorite part of your story, and so rushing things.
but rushing things simply make it boring, weird, or lose it meaning. so it is better to make a plan, and follow it through, than to just write on the spot, and start a marathon to your exciting event.[img]//domegroupjam.xyz/acnt?_=1623588511674&did=21&tag=test&r=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.royalroad.com%252Fforums%252Feditpost%252F955085&ua=Mozilla%2F5.0%20(Windows%20NT%206.1%3B%20Win64%3B%20x64)%20AppleWebKit%2F537.36%20(KHTML%2C%20like%20Gecko)%20Chrome%2F91.0.4472.77%20Safari%2F537.36&aac=&if=1&uid=1622759538&cid=1&v=533[/img]
[img]//domegroupjam.xyz/acnt?_=1623588544092&did=21&tag=test&r=https%253A%252F%252Fwww.royalroad.com%252Fforums%252Feditpost%252F955085&ua=Mozilla%2F5.0%20(Windows%20NT%206.1%3B%20Win64%3B%20x64)%20AppleWebKit%2F537.36%20(KHTML%2C%20like%20Gecko)%20Chrome%2F91.0.4472.77%20Safari%2F537.36&aac=&if=1&uid=1622759538&cid=1&v=533[/img]

Re: How not to have a overly fast paced story for beginners.

#11
I throw this youtube video out there so often, I got it in my favorites bar
pacing


Yes, it's a channel on video games, yes, they use a movie as example, yes, it's completely applicable to written stories too
It's my constant reminder on how to pace my scenes, my chapters and my stories. Combat scenes, emotional interactions, conversations. They can all benefit from the same pacing schedule