Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#102

Tynian Wrote: It is actually a thing for mollusqus and insects. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemocyanin

On the subject of nematods and blood (but with hemoglobine) you also have that sea worm whose blood can be safely transfused to the human and is currently researched both for transfusion but also for brain oedema management. https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/16897713/


Oh that's fascinating!! 

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#105

Zearth Wrote:
AlexaLee Wrote:
Zearth Wrote: 100th reply.

Also, when you're too cold, you'll feel hot. I presume part of it could be due to your nerves, part of it due to outside temperature. Who knows.


That's interesting! Did you research paradoxical undressing too? That's so interesting to me.
Not really. I only vaguely remembered the term, so I'll have to check again.


It's when someone is in the like final stages of hypothermia, they start to strip their clothes off!

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#106

AlexaLee Wrote:
Zearth Wrote:
AlexaLee Wrote:
Zearth Wrote: 100th reply.

Also, when you're too cold, you'll feel hot. I presume part of it could be due to your nerves, part of it due to outside temperature. Who knows.


That's interesting! Did you research paradoxical undressing too? That's so interesting to me.
Not really. I only vaguely remembered the term, so I'll have to check again.


It's when someone is in the like final stages of hypothermia, they start to strip their clothes off!
Yup, checked that online. Because of confusion and the likes.

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#107

Zearth Wrote: 100th reply.

Also, when you're too cold, you'll feel hot. I presume part of it could be due to your nerves, part of it due to outside temperature. Who knows.

This one is  due to how our pain perception works both on the neural ways and on the processing of the information.  


Temperature and nociception share the same neural pathways https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nociception.

Intense heat/cold/pain (and some crushings and chemicals) will "overload" the pathway, activating all sensations at once. (just like a searing hot burn can give you a brief cold sensation before the pain takes over.

Then there is the influence of the https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/diffuse-noxious-inhibitory-control Diffuse noxious inhibitory control. 

Its role is to make sure to give you a real info (if you feel pain, it must be real and not just white noise). It enhances smaller signals and dulls diffuse ones. 

For ex: if you feel pain somewhere, hitting you somewhere else will create a diffuse info and the DNIC will lower the pain sensation everywhere (the concept of slapping someone beforereducing a fracture or pinching you elsewhere at the same time you get a vaccine shot) 

When getting diffuse information (cold everywhere) the DNIC just "bugs" and ends up telling you that there is "no cold everywhere"=hot. (and same for the reverse, people with severe diffuse burn will tell you how they felt chilled during the accident.)

It is also part of how morphine works (pure agonist for mu and kappa receptors), morphine activates all pain receptors, sending the DNIC in disarray, if there is pain messages coming from everywhere=white sound=no pain.  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959438805001029
https://www.ebmconsult.com/articles/opioid-agonist-pain-mechanism-CNS

There are more mechanisms and routes, explaining how you can still feel "pain" even under opiods or after loosing a limb etc... but DNIC and neural pathway gate control are the explanation for some counter intuitive feelings. 

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#108

Tynian Wrote: his one is  due to how our pain perception works both on the neural ways and on the processing of the information.  


Temperature and nociception share the same neural pathways https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nociception.

Intense heat/cold/pain (and some crushings and chemicals) will "overload" the pathway, activating all sensations at once. (just like a searing hot burn can give you a brief cold sensation before the pain takes over.

Then there is the influence of the https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/diffuse-noxious-inhibitory-control Diffuse noxious inhibitory control. 

Its role is to make sure to give you a real info (if you feel pain, it must be real and not just white noise). It enhances smaller signals and dulls diffuse ones. 

For ex: if you feel pain somewhere, hitting you somewhere else will create a diffuse info and the DNIC will lower the pain sensation everywhere (the concept of slapping someone beforereducing a fracture or pinching you elsewhere at the same time you get a vaccine shot) 

When getting diffuse information (cold everywhere) the DNIC just "bugs" and ends up telling you that there is "no cold everywhere"=hot. (and same for the reverse, people with severe diffuse burn will tell you how they felt chilled during the accident.)

It is also part of how morphine works (pure agonist for mu and kappa receptors), morphine activates all pain receptors, sending the DNIC in disarray, if there is pain messages coming from everywhere=white sound=no pain.  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959438805001029
https://www.ebmconsult.com/articles/opioid-agonist-pain-mechanism-CNS

There are more mechanisms and routes, explaining how you can still feel "pain" even under opiods or after loosing a limb etc... but DNIC and neural pathway gate control are the explanation for some counter intuitive feelings.


This is fun!! Do you work in the area/in research or are you just super interested in it?

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#110

Tynian Wrote:
Zearth Wrote: 100th reply.

Also, when you're too cold, you'll feel hot. I presume part of it could be due to your nerves, part of it due to outside temperature. Who knows.

This one is  due to how our pain perception works both on the neural ways and on the processing of the information.  


Temperature and nociception share the same neural pathways https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nociception.

Intense heat/cold/pain (and some crushings and chemicals) will "overload" the pathway, activating all sensations at once. (just like a searing hot burn can give you a brief cold sensation before the pain takes over.

Then there is the influence of the https://www.sciencedirect.com/topics/medicine-and-dentistry/diffuse-noxious-inhibitory-control Diffuse noxious inhibitory control. 

Its role is to make sure to give you a real info (if you feel pain, it must be real and not just white noise). It enhances smaller signals and dulls diffuse ones. 

For ex: if you feel pain somewhere, hitting you somewhere else will create a diffuse info and the DNIC will lower the pain sensation everywhere (the concept of slapping someone beforereducing a fracture or pinching you elsewhere at the same time you get a vaccine shot) 

When getting diffuse information (cold everywhere) the DNIC just "bugs" and ends up telling you that there is "no cold everywhere"=hot. (and same for the reverse, people with severe diffuse burn will tell you how they felt chilled during the accident.)

It is also part of how morphine works (pure agonist for mu and kappa receptors), morphine activates all pain receptors, sending the DNIC in disarray, if there is pain messages coming from everywhere=white sound=no pain.  https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/abs/pii/S0959438805001029
https://www.ebmconsult.com/articles/opioid-agonist-pain-mechanism-CNS

There are more mechanisms and routes, explaining how you can still feel "pain" even under opiods or after loosing a limb etc... but DNIC and neural pathway gate control are the explanation for some counter intuitive feelings.
I suppose that's also the same idea as dipping both hands in cold and hot water respectively, then dipping it in warm water?

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#111
Probably leaning more towards squick but how it actually feels to have your thumb cut off how long that would take to heal and coming up with authentic character reactions. Needless to say I ended up taking that scene out as I felt it pushed the book into gore. AHH! this giving me the heebie-jeebies again. peodistress


Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#112

darkocean Wrote: Probably leaning more towards squick but how it actually feels to have your thumb cut off how long that would take to heal and coming up with authentic character reactions. needless to say I ended up taking that sxene out as I felt it pushed teh book into gore. AHH! this giving me the heebie-jeebies again. peodistress



Oof that's a fun but horrifying thing to google? 

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#113


AlexaLee Wrote:
darkocean Wrote: Probably leaning more towards squick but how it actually feels to have your thumb cut off how long that would take to heal and coming up with authentic character reactions. needless to say I ended up taking that sxene out as I felt it pushed teh book into gore. AHH! this giving me the heebie-jeebies again. peodistress



Oof that's a fun but horrifying thing to google?

Yes on both accounts. I'm always having to look up weird stuff. Just looked up: about ancient crypts terms.   I don't google the filter bubble is a pain in the butt. I Startpage. xD



Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#115
Hmm, let me see, the list is long but I think the strangest thing was how to concoct a viable drug and poison test with materials and methods available in a medieval to renaissance time period. And yes, it is possible. DrakanGlasses



EDIT: In that category was also the research on natural aphrodisiacs. Believe it or not, there are some lengthy publications in approved medical journals on the effectiveness of Horny goat weed.

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#117

Tynian Wrote: This one is  due to how our pain perception works both on the neural ways and on the processing of the information.
I second that explanation and can add a lot of personal experience. I "burn" myself several times per month on our -80°C (-112°F) fridge in the lab... I should learn to wear gloves but when I am in a hurry to take or put samples in, I always think "This time it won't happen". Well, touching a -80°C  metal door corrects me every time. It feels like burning yourself on the stove and, if I am really unlucky, I even get the blisters to show.

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#118

darkocean Wrote: Yes on both accounts. I'm always having to look up weird stuff. Just looked up: about ancient crypts terms.   I don't google the filter bubble is a pain in the butt. I Startpage. xD



Ohh that is very fun. Tell us more. What did you find??


TeeMcTee Wrote: I thankfully haven't had to look up too much weird stuff. It's mainly clothes in the medieval era and how they look, I also had to look up how long it took for a broken arm to heal. 6 to 8 weeks, but thankfully nothing weird just yet.


That's far shorter than I expected? But I'm sure it feels much longer to anyone with a broken arm!


Ariana Wrote: Hmm, let me see, the list is long but I think the strangest thing was how to concoct a viable drug and poison test with materials and methods available in a medieval to renaissance time period. And yes, it is possible. 



EDIT: In that category was also the research on natural aphrodisiacs. Believe it or not, there are some lengthy publications in approved medical journals on the effectiveness of Horny goat weed.


Interesting and good to know! About the drug and poison test. The other is strange. I may have to do some googling.


Ramingo Wrote: If I hadn't got a couple back when I was in middle/elementary school, I would have had to research how much a kick to the balls hurts. Does that count?


Ahahaha fair thing to google! I've had to google the same before!


Ariana Wrote: I second that explanation and can add a lot of personal experience. I "burn" myself several times per month on our -80°C (-112°F) fridge in the lab... I should learn to wear gloves but when I am in a hurry to take or put samples in, I always think "This time it won't happen". Well, touching a -80°C  metal door corrects me every time. It feels like burning yourself on the stove and, if I am really unlucky, I even get the blisters to show.


Oof but fascinating! Does the pain linger as long as a heat burn? What is the solution? With hot burn I know you're meant to run it under cool water, what about cold burns? If my experience working in a lab is universal, mostly you just suck it up unless it's really bad?

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#119

AlexaLee Wrote: Oof but fascinating! Does the pain linger as long as a heat burn? What is the solution? With hot burn I know you're meant to run it under cool water, what about cold burns? If my experience working in a lab is universal, mostly you just suck it up unless it's really bad?
Oh, yes, the pain does linger for a day or two, or more depending on the burn. It is first burning, then stabbing like little needles later on. The burnt spot loses all feeling too. And since I usually burn the tips of my fingers... it is an interesting experience. Putting it under cold water could do... little good but also no damage. The most important thing is to NEVER put warm water on it. Warm water further harms the cells at the burnt spot. As for treatment, your regular salve for burns or even a normal hand creme would do since, at least in my case, the burnt area is really small and the damage is not that severe. The general answer is - the salve should contain a lot of fat and be nourishing. 

Now, it is another thing if we discuss burns from liquid nitrogen ( 196 °C [− 320 °F]). How do I know? Well, I got burned with liquid nitrogen for medical purposes and also know someone who managed to douse their entire hand in the stuff. Liquid nitrogen is nasty. You have heard of frostbite necrosis? Same thing here but much faster. The medical application is not so problematic - it hurts like hell until your skin and nerves die (meaning a few seconds) and then you feel nothing... until the healing starts and then it hurts and itches and it lasts for over a week. If you douse your hand in the stuff, you are in for big trouble and need special medical attention asap. In the worst-case scenario you can lose fingers, your hand, or, if the limb survives, lose some degree of mobility. 

Re: What is the strangest thing you have had to research for your writing?

#120

Ariana Wrote: Oh, yes, the pain does linger for a day or two, or more depending on the burn. It is first burning, then stabbing like little needles later on. The burnt spot loses all feeling too. And since I usually burn the tips of my fingers... it is an interesting experience. Putting it under cold water could do... little good but also no damage. The most important thing is to NEVER put warm water on it. Warm water further harms the cells at the burnt spot. As for treatment, your regular salve for burns or even a normal hand creme would do since, at least in my case, the burnt area is really small and the damage is not that severe. The general answer is - the salve should contain a lot of fat and be nourishing. 

Now, it is another thing if we discuss burns from liquid nitrogen ( 196 °C [− 320 °F]). How do I know? Well, I got burned with liquid nitrogen for medical purposes and also know someone who managed to douse their entire hand in the stuff. Liquid nitrogen is nasty. You have heard of frostbite necrosis? Same thing here but much faster. The medical application is not so problematic - it hurts like hell until your skin and nerves die (meaning a few seconds) and then you feel nothing... until the healing starts and then it hurts and itches and it lasts for over a week. If you douse your hand in the stuff, you are in for big trouble and need special medical attention asap. In the worst-case scenario you can lose fingers, your hand, or, if the limb survives, lose some degree of mobility.


Oh, fascinating and horrifying! Oof, I bet that is rough. Huh, okay, good to know! 

Oh, interesting! Why would someone use liquid nitrogen for medical purposes and would they not numb the area first? That sounds nasty!!