Re: English as a second language

#22

Maxine Wrote: Okay, I'm impressed. I can't imagine writing in another language and am still struggling to learn Spanish. I wish I had learned a second language as a kid when it would have been easier. I would expect there to be some cultural influences unless you didn't grow up in your native country.
 

I've heard that from a lot from Native English speakers, but I think it mostly has to do with the difference between:

- Learning a new language for fun

- Learning a new language for "survival"

A solid chunk of the internet, books, games, softwares, etc are in english. In a modern context, not being able to be functional in english is the equivalent of acknowledging you will cut yourself from 90% of the world for the remaining of your days.

And once you start spending so much time online and doing all these things, well english simply becomes a second nature. Yeah it's awkward at first, but eventually with practice, your writting will look close to indistinguishable from the average native speaker.

Re: English as a second language

#24
Russian/Polish here, I struggle the most with English punctuation rules which are different from those in continental Europe

In the beginning tho, I used to struggle with tenses the most. As do most people whose first language isn't English, I had trouble understanding that if I write a book in past tense, then all of it must be in past tenses only. Normally you'd write the statements of how things are in present tense(The kingdom is huge) and what characters did in past tense(our heroes visited the huge kingdom)

Re: English as a second language

#26
Third language here (Hungarian/German). 

What I will probably never understand is the punctuation - it is completly different than in my other two.
Next is the difference between UK/US spelling. 
And the spelling in general. Both Hungarian and German spelling is nearer to the spoken language, but not so in English. (it has probably something to do that letters are spoken differently in English than on the continent...)

Re: English as a second language

#27
ESL here as well. I do write a lot in my native langage but mostly boring academic stuff. I started to write fiction in English for a few reason. 
1. To have a clean break from my every day job.
2. To improve my English.
3. To reach a wider audience.
4. To challenge myself. 

My writing is definitely influenced by all the amazing French writers I grew up reading. 

Re: English as a second language

#28
English is my second language. I mainly speak Cebuano—and Tagalog back in school. Due to English being an official language in my country, I got the hang of it real quick. I’ve watched Western stuff ever since I was five.

Now, I have an interest learning Japanese (for my love for their culture) and Indonesian (for a longtime Discord friend.) Sadly, none of these are getting anywhere as of now. I’m really, really busy writing my novel. Joining the Writeathon made it worse.

DrakanSigh

Re: English as a second language

#29

Felix Wrote: English is my second language. I mainly speak Cebuano—and Tagalog back in school. Due to English being an official language in my country, I got the hang of it real quick. I’ve watched Western stuff ever since I was five.


Oddly, I got the feeling that you were from SEA while reading your story. Kinda odd that the guess was accurate, now that I think of it.

That said, I think English is something like a third language for me since I learned Mongolian and Russian before I did English. Basically, if you didn't know Russian ten years ago in Mongolia, you weren't "educated". Now, everyone's gravitated to English as the de facto scholarly language. In case you're wondering, both Mongolian and Russian use Cyrillic so it's easy to make that transition.

Re: English as a second language

#30

Dusty_Glamour Wrote: Basically, if you didn't know Russian ten years ago in Mongolia, you weren't "educated".
Now, that’s something completely knew to me. I’ve never met a Mongolian before on the internet, and I believe this is because most don’t have access to it. I heard a lot of people there are still traditional tribes living in mountains. In my country, there are 1500+ small islands populated by many who never had outside contact.

Re: English as a second language

#32

Felix Wrote: Now, that’s something completely knew to me. I’ve never met a Mongolian before on the internet, and I believe this is because most don’t have access to it. I heard a lot of people there are still traditional tribes living in mountains. In my country, there are 1500+ small islands populated by many who never had outside contact.


There's only a few tribes to the North that don't have cellular service, and that's purely by choice. Almost everyone over here has internet service, contrary to popular belief. Around 60% of the population lives in the capital and all the towns have cellular service. The fact that you don't see a lot of us online isn't the fact that most of us don't have internet, but because even if all of us are out here, there are ultimately only 3 million of us. Over half of them are from a generation that never bothered to learn English so they're not coming to this part of the internet anytime soon. Then a quarter of us aren't even toxic 13 year olds yet.

In the end, it leaves less than a million Mongolians who can properly converse in English.

Re: English as a second language

#33

Dusty_Glamour Wrote: The fact that you don't see a lot of us online isn't the fact that most of us don't have internet, but because even if all of us are out here, there are ultimately only 3 million of us.
Well, that makes sense. My country’s population is projected to reach 142 million by 2045. That’s very insane when you do the math. It doesn’t help either that the island nation is relatively small to hold such people afloat.

Re: English as a second language

#36

Quote:Basically, if you didn't know Russian ten years ago in Mongolia, you weren't "educated". 
Yeah that was also true for us 30 years ago. Back when I was in kiddy-school, they tried to teach me Russian, but not with much success. I do remember some of the letters and maybe even can figure out, what is written there, but not much. (the funny part was, when we sent the reds packing, we got switched from Russian to English - the teacher was the same, and she was only a couple of lessons ahead us in learning English...) By the time I tried to learn Croatian for fun (20 years ago), I already forgot most of what I was tought. Not that Croatian has much similarity to Russian...


But hey, I LOVE Mongolian Metal! :D