Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#1
Hello! I am a fantasy author here on RR, and I myself like a lot slowly moving stories with lots of world building, character development, actions and other stuff.

What would you choose a novel with 1000+ chapters with everything from above where reader travels with MC from his 1st step to the last, showing how he trained grew and did other stuff or a short, but quick story around 600-700 chapters, filled with action, where many things that happened to MC are omitted and with the minimum amount of worldbuilding?

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#2
I'm biased because the story I'm writing falls onto the slower side of things, but slower, gradual stories. I think you can develop things more, and I'm okay with slower, worldbuilding or character developing chapters. There's a line, where it's tedious reading about six chapters of a character doing their laundry, which is what you risk when you go too long, but I still generally prefer longer, slower stories. 

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#6
I've noticed that a lot of readers on here expect fantasy stories to be much faster paced.
Both types of stories have their pros and cons.  I write a slow paced story so I can only talk about that.
Cons of Slow Paced Stories
A) people less likely to leave a review because they need to read much farther in
B) People less likely to stick with the story, so if you do a slower story with more worldbuilding, your story needs to be much more solid and requires a much higher grasp on writing skills
However there are pros to slower stories
A)Much more in-depth plots. People that stick around for longer stories live for that stuff. 
B)When people review my story I get higher marks on character and setting because its slower paced and has more silly details about their lives, such as the fact my MC keeps people on his contact lists with nicknames like HAS BAD TASTE IN MOVIES.

A personal pro for me is that I just like adding silly stuff and details.... it's all about the journey and not the end result, right? The hardest part about writing slow paced stories is that you need to understand which scenes are relevant to your plot so you don't make the mistakes I made when I started, writing scenes that did nothing for the plot, or could be condensed into three paragraphs for the sake of pacing.

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#8
This sounds like a good question for a poll! Too bad we don't have that on the forums :(  Oh look! A suggestion page: https://feedback.royalroad.com/i598-polls-on-the-forums.  Your vote counts!

Back to your question, I'm going to be difficult and say I prefer complete stories.  Both fast and slow work for that.  That said, a fast story is more likely to be completed, so perhaps a slight preference to the former.

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#9
I really like an even balance of both fast paced action and slow world-building and character development moments. A lovely wave pattern so I can take a breathe, take it in, then go through the paces, before having a period of recovery before I go at it again. Those slow, sweet moments really make you appreciate what's at stake when the hero is battling.

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#10
I don't mind a slow burn that meanders, but I hate it when the plot stagnates.

What I mean is if our characters have obstacles that pop up in their path or detours they end up having to take, I am fine with that.

But I absolutely hate it when we get like 57 chapters of our characters wandering through a the same forest.

I just finished the 1st audiobook of The Wheel of Time and it took me like 3 commutes to work (both ways, 25 minutes each) before I just gave up and fast-forwarded another hour through the characters traveling through The Ways (not gonna say more than that for spoilers).

My attention span literally isn't long enough for that.

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#11
I like books that fall in the middle. Just enough world-building to understand what's going on. Just enough plot to know what to expect. I like character-driven stories more, so I'm sure that has something to do with it. 

I also prefer to learn more about the world through the character(s) lens as we go. Personally, I won't remember very much detail in the beginning bc those details aren't important to me yet. Like why should I care about the history of a kingdom and why it's now being overthrown? Unless the MC happened to live in that kingdom, their family was killed during the siege, and now the MC's on a journey to kill the dark king (with their dishonorable companions).

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#14
There's something to be said about stories that take 1000+ chapters to reach the ultimate climax, but still move at a fast clip. I know it's not technically over 1000 separate chapters, but Wildebow's Worm is a good example of this. It takes all 7,000 pages for it to reach the Big Plot Point, but each arc has a focused conflict and a new layer of world-building so that the reading experience is gripping and sustains momentum even with update gaps. That is my personal preference for pacing as a reader. It's fine if an author takes time to play in the sandbox with arcs of filler, fluff, or meticulous skill grinding, but if I happen to hit the chapter cap at that time I tend to not pick the story up again. 

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#16
Neither too much action makes the story stale and repetitive too much world-building makes the plot disappears. there's a saying that everything in a story must have a purpose, if there's action it must either progress the plot or covey something, same with world building but that can also be used for creating ambiance and mood.

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#17

world_wanderer Wrote: Hello! I am a fantasy author here on RR, and I myself like a lot slowly moving stories with lots of world building, character development, actions and other stuff.

What would you choose a novel with 1000+ chapters with everything from above where reader travels with MC from his 1st step to the last, showing how he trained grew and did other stuff or a short, but quick story around 600-700 chapters, filled with action, where many things that happened to MC are omitted and with the minimum amount of worldbuilding?

For a Fantasy, there is no choosing one or the other for me. It has to do both at the same time. Meaning, it gradually builds, while expanding. Within this, action, character development, etc. 

Another thing, I would never choose a story with 600+ chapters. At that point, I am positive it will turn to crap. Around 100 is good. Concentrate the story, while expanding at the same time. 

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#18
Ideally somewhere in the middle. 

Given the choice between the two I'd go for slow and world building.

Robin Hobb's - Farseer Trilogy is a really good example of that. It's written in first person which is typically fast past where the main character plays the role as both protagonist and antagonist as seen in Prince of Thorn (Broken Empire) series. Hobb actually manages to slow the pace down yet still keep the story interesting. This is all due to her extraordinary character building of Fitz, the main character. Even now, 15 years later. Fitz still feels like a brother to me. 

Re: What do you prefer more in the fantasy? A fast-moving plot with a lot of action or a slow story with worl (...)

#20
Hi,



I want the story to grip me and to do that, I think you need a bit of both.

If I look at examples of books I read:

There are one or two authors I read several books from and I liked them, there's a lot of fast-paced action going on. But sometimes while reading I found myself thinking: Wouldn't it be nice if the MC had the time to take a deep breath and perhaps spend a relaxing evening or day with his friends and/or a partner and have an unhurried conversation. Instead through the whole book MC barely managed to get a few hours of sleep in before the next fight/catastrophe occurs. Even as a reader I find this pace stressful occasionally.

On the positive side you could say that the story certainly left an impression on me.



Look at 'The lord of the rings' on the other hand. Tolkien takes a lot of time to build his world and develop an atmosphere. It took me a few pages in the first book to get immersed in the story. But to this day I remember intensely (I read TLOTR about 40 years ago) the gripping suspension when the dark riders appeared time and again or the wondrous atmosphere of Rivendell or Moria.


Whereas I have to say it took me ages to get through the second book (and I am and have always been a voracious reader). Tolkien certainly builds up an atmosphere during the long, bleak and exhausting journey to Mordor but sometimes I just wasn't very interested in reading on during that phase. So, you can have too much of a good thing there. (Of course personal tastes differ, no offence)



My favourite authors grip me from the first page on and never let go of me, be it through fights or dialogue or character development. A few days ago, I wanted to research how to write a good dialogue and I took out one of my favourite books and started to read the first pages to see how the author wrote her conversations. Next thing I remember, I am several chapters in and have to hold myself back from reading on. Totally forgot about the whole research dialogue part in between. That's a perfect story.

If only I could write half that well (the book was 'Dragon bones' by Patricia Briggs by the way). If I think about the book I can't really tell you if it's slow-building or fast-moving. Maybe a perfect blend of the two.