Re: What does your writing process look like?

#1
For me:

1. Concept phase: Create the basic premise of the story, it's beginning, middle and end.

2. Manuscript drafting phase: Write first manuscript using the following writing process:

-Write a scene or scenes during the writing season.
-Perform basic copy and line editing for the scenes I wrote during your my last season the next time I write, to make sure the presentation is ok even for a first draft.

3. Developmental editing phase: Rewrite portions of the manuscript as needed until I'm happy with it.

4. Post-editing phase. Work with an actual editor to polish up the manuscript.

5. ???

6. Profit!






Re: What does your writing process look like?

#2
ideas
tentative writing
research
editing
MISERABLE PILE OF SECRETS

take a few days off; come back and look at it later

write like fuck
What should the end goal be like?
editing
rewriting
research
Draft 0 complete!

take a few days off; come back and look at it later

dissect it 
rewrite it using different words, different perspectives, different techniques. 
edit it all back together
Draft 1 complete!

take a few days off; come back and look at it later

Compare and contrast Draft 0 with Draft 1
Look for things like narrative flow, pacing, character development, world building, and how "smooth" the dialogue sounds.
Plug in my mic into my computer, turn on Audacity, and read the draft to my computer.
(When you read something out loud, sometimes you change things slightly than when you write them)
Frankenstein-stitch the two drafts together in a way where both versions complement each other the best
Draft 2 complete!

take a few days off; come back and look at it later

Nip and tuck:
Scalpel: cut out unnecessary scenes.
Add filler to explain things that are clear to me but might not be clear too other people. 
rewrite everything so that it is once again contiguous. 
Draft 3 complete!

There are a variety of other things I do, but I've touched on the major points. 

Usually around Draft 8 or 9 I am satisfied with what I've written. 

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#3
1. Come up with idea
2. Think about idea nonstop
3. Draft about 1.3k words in one night
4. Writer's block
5. Oh shoot, I'm supposed to start uploading my project in 7 days and I only have 1 chapter in backlog written
6. Scramble to write and edit everything the night before the first chapter is supposed to launch
7. Make corrections days or weeks after the fact

Rinse and repeat ;)

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#4
1 - Have a rough idea of the events of the following chapter
2 - Start writing and filling out the details on the fly.
3 - Write 2k words around over the course of 2+ hours.
4 - Have a very helpful friend who helps you edit.
5 - Make corrections and double-check the chapter.
6 - Publish it.
7 - Repeat it the next day.

More or less how it goes for me, though recently I have been trying to lay out chapters with more detail. Seeing if it helps me write faster.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#5
1. Suddenly have an idea that I don't have time to commit to because I have too much other stuff to do.
2. Keep thinking about the idea anyway and proceed to develop lore, world-building, characters, basic plot building blocks, etc.
3. Attempt to put all that onto paper so I have notes to refer to while writing.
4. Fail at #3.
5. Start writing the actual story with only vague notes written down and everything else in my head where it keeps changing.
6. Tell myself I'll plan out the finer details when I get there.
7. Get to that point without having the details planned and now I have to write anyway it anyway.
8. Procrastinate as any deadlines I have set for myself approach.
9. Force myself to sit down and write and then I write a whole chapter out of desperation.
10. Look at the chapter and think "oh this isn't so bad, I can edit this."
11. Edit the chapter.
12. Post the chapter and immediately worry it's terrible.

I mean, steps 8 and 9 are how I functioned all throughout school so I guess I at least have experience with the "I have no control over my life" tactic.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#6

Mai Wrote: 1. Suddenly have an idea that I don't have time to commit to because I have too much other stuff to do.
2. Keep thinking about the idea anyway and proceed to develop lore, world-building, characters, basic plot building blocks, etc.
3. Attempt to put all that onto paper so I have notes to refer to while writing.
4. Fail at #3.

1. Dream an amazing plot. All the characters fit together, the scenario plays out perfectly, everything fits together the way it should.
2. Wake up with the knowledge that yes, everything is going to be perfect, awesome, and perfectly awesome.
3. Sit down to write and realize you've forgotten about 30% already.
4. Actually start writing and realize you've forgotten about half.
5. Want to give up because you only have a vague concept in your head as to how the story is supposed to develop.
6. WHY CAN'T I KICK ALL THESE ROCKS?!

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#7

Nestor1079 Wrote:
Mai Wrote: 1. Suddenly have an idea that I don't have time to commit to because I have too much other stuff to do.
2. Keep thinking about the idea anyway and proceed to develop lore, world-building, characters, basic plot building blocks, etc.
3. Attempt to put all that onto paper so I have notes to refer to while writing.
4. Fail at #3.

1. Dream an amazing plot. All the characters fit together, the scenario plays out perfectly, everything fits together the way it should.
2. Wake up with the knowledge that yes, everything is going to be perfect, awesome, and perfectly awesome.
3. Sit down to write and realize you've forgotten about 30% already.
4. Actually start writing and realize you've forgotten about half.
5. Want to give up because you only have a vague concept in your head as to how the story is supposed to develop.
6. WHY CAN'T I KICK ALL THESE ROCKS?!

7. Put a dream journal next to your bed and scribble in it as soon as you wake up. :)

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#8
1. Finish the previous project. Feel exhausted, and not motivated to start anything new. Realize that sitting on my hands isn't an option
2. Brainstorm. What am I trying to accomplish with this project? Brainstorm/mind map. Plot out some broad-strokes objectives
3. Outline. Outline. Outline
4. Dive in! Start writing
6. Forget to shave. Forget to sleep. Forget my friends who want to do things with me
7. Look at the last unfinished third and have an existential crisis.
8. Pray to the elder gods or beg the muses to give me the strength to just get it finished
9. Keep writing
10. Finish it up and ship it off to whoever is going to do the editing pass
11. Editing pass comes back. Start polishing pass.
12. Finish polishing pass. Go to 1.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#9
Write a scene. Imagine what should happen next. Keep going. Come up with lore and worldbuilding as we go.

Think of a few neat ideas for what could occur later on. Keep writing.

Narrow down cool ideas for later, change them completely, retcon things to make them fit. Write more.

Reach almost the end. Panic.

Procrastinate.

Force it out anyway.

Rewrite it because it was terrible. Repeat as necessary.

The end.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#10
For me I don't think I have a concept phase as such- I'm just sort of continuously doing that. On my sticky notes app I have ideas from up to even 5 years ago and I'm constantly fleshing them out just for fun, until one day I want to write them.

1) first draft. This is the hardest, the longest and most emotional part.
It goes
- overall vague outline
-browbeat, cajole, blackmail and threaten myself into pantsing as much as I can until about the rising action, when I literally can't write anymore without a more detailed plan.
- use what I have written so far to plan the next few scenes more fully, and revise the overall plan.
-browbeat, cajole, blackmail and threaten myself into actually writing those scenes.
-repeat the last two steps until the first draft is complete.

2) edit. It gets much easier from here, because now there is a shitty piece of writing from which I can excavate something less shitty.
-First I print it out and red pen it. This usually includes some structural overhauls to the whole thing.
-Print, red pain again.
-Then I'll ask for critique from my writing society or some classmates, and implement the changes. I'll probably do this thrice.
-then it's time for the most nerve wracking part, beta readers. If all goes well I just have to implement some more minor changes. If not, structural changes (though that's rare).

When there's an end product that both I'm happy with, and at least half of my beta readers are happy with then I just leave it there. At this point all passion for both the concept and writing in general has been wrung out of me. I go for a drink to forget the trauma that writing that was, and the next week I start all over again.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#11
  1. I listen to music, all the scenes are set to specific songs, slow or fast. I play it on repeat until I can envision the scene perfectly in my mind.
  2. I rarely plot out chapters, but for overall volumes I will plot them out using the monomyth circle which works great since my story has gods and fantasy.
  3. A) For singular chapters I just type and I'll review it later. Sometimes research is needed, usually not because worldbuilding is long established.
  4. Research. This is when it gets weird.
  5. A) I have a lot of fight scenes and I go into graphic details, since it has horror elements. I will sometimes take fruit, or some other food with a similar consistency I imagine a muscle to have, and crush it. Write it down, describe it, use the worst words I can come up with to describe how people die.

    B) I'm sure there's an FBI agent watching me with the very specific questions I have google such as how do serial killers get away with murder  or what does a cop do every day, for the short scenes I involve with the police lol.

    C) If there is further difficulty describing a scene I do a quick doodle. Helps when doing fight scenes to remember placement of multiple characters.

    4.Post to RR and forget to edit/review for grammar or story inconsistencies.

    5.Have a very nice person point out these things to me but about 500 pages into a volume.

    6.Spend several days editing said chapters and remind myself to actually edit before I upload

    7.Forget about number six, and do it all over again!
Simplified Monomyth circle for the curious.

https%3A%2F%2Flh5.googleusercontent.com%2FqzQlLm...pzkuVIJddJ
  1. A character is in a zone of comfort
  2. But they want something
  3. They enter an unfamiliar situation
  4. Adapt to it
  5. Get what they wanted
  6. Pay a heavy price for it
  7. Then return to their familiar situation
  8. Having changed

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#12
1. Plot out vague ideas of what happens in a scene.
2. Start writing, pants out the wazoo
3a. If really lazy and wanting to literally anything else other than write, stop after reaching 500 words goal.
3b. If really in the flow, then just keep writing the chapter. At this point I might reach 1k words or even 2k and beyond.
4a. Stop writing and continue either tomorrow, then the previous 2 steps are repeated.
4b. Stop writing for a few days or more, then back to 3a/b.
5. Chapter is finally done being written!
6. Start editing in Scrinever, either immediately or the day after. This takes less than a hour and mainly focuses on spelling corrections and any slight grammatical errors I notice.
7. Import chapter to Grammarly on one monitor, and do "live edits" on the other in Scrinever.
8. After finishing up Grammarly edits, import the document to Gdocs, where I do the same live edits thing.
9. Chapter is now finished editing! Process takes about 2-3 hours at most. Import chapter to Royalroad and iron out the punctuation because premium chapter importing now hates Scrinever v3 imports when it comes to quotation marks, italics, and em dashes.
10. Either schedule it for a weekend release, or publish right away if I'm half a week past or more past expected deadline.
11. Get incredibly lazy and don't write for 7 days straight, whining about being past deadline and doing other hobbies. This tedious process then starts over.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#13
1: Very rough idea of what the chapter should do
2: Start filling in big moments, which is usually around 500 words
3: Expand on bigger moments, which brings to around 1000-1500 words
4: Connect big moments, which gets me to around 2000 words
5: Basically rewrite the entire chapter, which I find helps me clean up grammar, expand on useful details or catch weird wordings
6: One last read through, adding anything I think it needs. 

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#14
1. Come up with ideas.
2. Think obsessively about ideas.
3. Write recklessly without any sort of rhythm or reason.
4. Despair.
5. ???
6. Read what I wrote. Hate what I wrote. Put it online anyway.
7. Move to Alaska and live as a goat.

My proof reader thinks I need to make use of outlines. I think I need Jesus. Overall it's an addicting process and I keep finding myself slip into old habits.  

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#15
1. Have a random idea for a turning point scene of a novel with no context. Write it in a google doc to forget it forever.

2. More scenes appear in my brain like pokemon in the wild. Write them too. They make no sense. They are not cohesive. Scream.

3. Realize they have formed the vague shape of a character arc. Judge whether or not the story is viable enough to pursue.

4. Put everything in Scrivener (thank God v3 for Windows came out) and start writing furiously, forgetting to eat, sleep, etc. because the ideas will not get out of my head. Think about writing when I'm not writing. GO.

5. Realize that while I have some very well developed characters with tension between them, I actually have no worldbuilding or plot.

6. Existential crisis. Call my friend Sarah and make her read it so she can tell me the characters are great and interesting, but it's too wordy and has no plot. Suspicions confirmed.

7. Drag the vague semblance of a plot out of the nethersphere of my brain, kicking and screaming.

8. Vague semblance of a plot arc takes shape. By this time, I'm months in. I have a 100k+ word draft and it's mostly incoherent. I've realized I'm not writing one book, my stupid brain is writing a full trilogy, or maybe a 7 book series. It keeps growing and growing, like a weed in direct sunlight with direct access to water. Know there is no hope I will finish it. Keep writing anyway, because addiction.

9. Start showing it to friends and posting it online because I know I have no hope of getting it done without a community to keep me going.

10. Edit a chapter to be not-trash enough to go onto the internet. Break it into smaller sections to be posted over the course of a week.

11. Panic because what if everyone thinks it's trash and I AM WASTING MY WHOLE ENTIRE LIFE???

12. Go back to filling in vague semblance of plot arc. See an actual book starting to come together--this might be possible after all. The trash draft development must stay ahead of the editing schedule. Pedal to the metal. Doubt myself. Grind. Doubt myself. Grind.

And I don't know what happens next. I guess I will find out.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#17
Have you ever heard the fable of the fox and the hedgehog?  The upshot of that fable is that the fox has lots of little ideas, but the hedgehog is better off having one big idea.  Anyway, some writers are hedgehogs, but I'm a fox.

0. Something inspires me to want to make a new story or at least an outline of one.  This might be an event like a marathon or an online class, or this might be that I have been reading a certain type of story (e.g. dungeon core, xianxia, isekai) and want to try my hand at it.  Perhaps most common, I have a strong urge to read a particular type of story but can't find anything that's quite right.  I've occassionally fantasized that if I could write a terrific outline I might then commission someone to write it for me so I can read it, lol.

1. I have piles of ideas that are far too small to base a story on.  So I've tried to sort them into lists based on what type of idea they are.  Every time I try to start a new story, I add to my lists all the ideas I've had since the last time I did this.  Typically there is a lack of ideas for events and actions, but I've got enough of all the other kinds to get started with.  If there are any pairs or trios of ideas that seem naturally inclined to stick to each other, I add that combo to my list of combos.  Yay lists?

2. Having all these lose pieces, I need a way to organize some of them into a complete story idea.  Previously I've done research and collected plot templates so I could use one of those or hack 2 or 3 into a hybrid more customized to my current inspiration (whatever motivated me to try to start a new story).  Or I could do new research by identifying the closest existing story(ies) to what I want to write, and making an analysis of it(them).  Or if I'm enamored of a particular idea or small combo of ideas, I can start with that and try to useit like a crystal seed, to get more ideas to snap into place around it.  Webbing is also great if I want dig into a specific idea to discover what king of connections it might form with other ideas.

3. From all that I'll end up with some descriptions of story ideas that are usually in the 2-5 paragraph range.  There's never one clear winner, but if there was I'd skip ahead to outline development.  I really prefer story development to be a social activity than a solo one, so I'll post these ideas in a forum or two in hopes of getting someone else's fresh perspective on them.  My own perspective on them right after brewing them up is probably too close to be useful in evaluating them and possibly remixing or twisting them to get a truly cool and motivating story concept.

4.  Meditate on the dao of this specific story and achieve enlightenment...?

5. Develop outline

6. If I absolutely have to or am truly into it, write.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#18

Tower Wrote: 1. Come up with ideas.
2. Think obsessively about ideas.
3. Write recklessly without any sort of rhythm or reason.
4. Despair.
5. ???
6. Read what I wrote. Hate what I wrote. Put it online anyway.
7. Move to Alaska and live as a goat.

My proof reader thinks I need to make use of outlines. I think I need Jesus. Overall it's an addicting process and I keep finding myself slip into old habits.

Normally what would go in step 5 here is a self editing phase or, if you hate doing it yourself/can't do it yourself, getting help from an editor or writers' group.  But if you completely hate rewriting, there may be no point asking for help planning a rewrite.

Re: What does your writing process look like?

#19
 

sunandshadow Wrote:
Tower Wrote: 1. Come up with ideas.
2. Think obsessively about ideas.
3. Write recklessly without any sort of rhythm or reason.
4. Despair.
5. ???
6. Read what I wrote. Hate what I wrote. Put it online anyway.
7. Move to Alaska and live as a goat.

My proof reader thinks I need to make use of outlines. I think I need Jesus. Overall it's an addicting process and I keep finding myself slip into old habits.

Normally what would go in step 5 here is a self editing phase or, if you hate doing it yourself/can't do it yourself, getting help from an editor or writers' group.  But if you completely hate rewriting, there may be no point asking for help planning a rewrite.



I force a friend to proof read my works. They get paid in donuts and coffee. 


Though I admit I have to get better editing help because I always hate what I write or I love it and there's literally no inbetween. If left on my own I will rewrite til the end of time and maybe that's too terrible.