Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#41

JK-sama Wrote:
AlexaLee Wrote:
JK-sama Wrote: It's been long deleted/reported but I had one user give a very long, lengthy review that pulled zero punches with extremely harsh criticism and bordered on attacking me directly. He claimed he did what he could to sugarcoat and provide constructive criticism, but, well... yeah, it wasn't a professional review in the slightest. Some of it was stuff that was unnecessary and could've just pointed out in chapter comments but he went out of his way to make complaints exaggerated. 

I corrected most of the things that were pointed out. It stung a lot but I got over it eventually.



Oh no, that’s so rough. I had a pretty tough early experience with a review that started out by saying they were going to be nice and constructed and ended by saying I should reconsider writing because maybe it wasn’t for me...

That's more or less what the review for mine topped it off with. They were like, "I'll forgive the author if they were 12 years old, but if you're not then you should give up." And I'm like... good to know people don't even bother reading the little author bio thingy at the end of every chapter. DrakanLaugh



Oof people are mean. 

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#42
The most negative feedback I've ever received is that all my characters are too edgy.  It's a parody but I suck at comedy, so no one knew. That's how I found out I'm not funny....
The most scathing reviews from my own experience have merit.
The stupidest review? 
That's entirely different. Someone complained why my fantasy story doesn't  have magicians when everyone has superpowers. Why would we need magicians, technically everyone is just a very specific magician at that point.

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#43

Wren Wrote: Ugh, I hated that kind of feedback. I think it's because a lot of people on Wattpad assume that becoming more popular is equivalent to improving your writing, so they hand out advice designed to propel your work up the popularity charts even if it means actively making your story worse. I got a lot of feedback that was basically "it's fine, but it'd be so much better if you made it a romance, cut all the chapters down to 500 words or less, changed the setting to be more like a modern day high school, added requisite 'mean girl bully' and 'sexy bad boy crush' characters, and made every character 16 years old..." In other words, it'd be much better if it was a completely different story in a completely different genre with completely different characters. Great, thanks!

Hahaha.  Yup. Wattpad had a lot of that. People were so desperate for followers that they'd join awards as judges and agree to a genre they didn't like. "Hey, your dark contemporary fantasy/horror about a necromancer would be so much cooler if it was a first-person teen romance with a picture of Harry Styles on the cover."

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#44
Can't really post that feedback here, since this account is for one particular story.

Everyone whos been on the internet for a decade know its a sesspool with great opportunaties. But, every story isn't written to be popular, become something great or end up in a easy to digest compact format. Then it wouldn't be the same story. The authors goal might not be the approval of the masses. Sometimes its just where the story ends up, like my current one. I know it needs an editor, but I sure as hell won't pay someone to translate or edit it. Its not written to be perfect, and I don't care about it being popular. I never even planed to actually translate it and post it somewhere, since its close to a million words as is. It was destined to stay on my harddrive.

I expect there to be both top ranks and bottom ranks for the same story, but its often funny that a lot of people seem to think ranking is a binary system, either max or min. Especially if there's a single chapter with something that annoys people. I can sometimes predict that I will take a drop in rating for including a couple of lines of text, or posting a chapter, but I still add those lines, because they tell something about the character or story. Avoiding it to be politically correct or woke? Nope. I don't add it to offend, but many people just see something they have preconceived notions about, completely missing why its written like that and included. But some people makes up a complete angled narrative in their head. And then they make a judgment in rating base on that, to punish the story/author, ignoring 99.9% or the story. Partly because they feel good about themselfs for doing it. A form of power over others. THAT is both the internet and real life. But why should I then care about their opinion?

I like mind good constructive feedback, good or bad. 

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#45
Well, the stories I've put out for public audiences over the years don't gain enough traction to really get negative feedback, most people are pretty helpful in pointing out critiques in a polite manner. However, I did have a (former) best friend when I was younger who was... Let's say she wasn't great at identifying what makes good or poor writing. We often shared stories with each other and took part in roleplaying together over text online, and there was a particular character of mine I made back in high school that she didn't like. At one point, she told me that fact, and so I asked her what she thought I should change about the character to improve him. Her response? "Nothing. He's just always gonna be bad." I should note that she literally followed this up by saying, "What, you gonna cry about it?" when she saw that I was visibly frustrated with her response.

Aside from the obvious red flag that my supposed best friend at the time was actually a total jerk (for this and many other reasons that are unrelated to the current topic), I pretty quickly realized that, if I'm going to get unhelpful "criticism" then I'm under no obligation to follow it and I shouldn't let it bother me. I for one liked the character as he was, so if a person I was supposed to like being around couldn't even give me a legitimate suggestion to improve and isn't going to be happy with any option I pick, then that's too bad for her, I'm not going to change anything.

Hilariously, I did make some pretty terrible characters back in high school, and the friend in question had some even worse ones. The character she disliked in particular was pretty dang solid if I judge by my current writing skills.

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#46

Wren Wrote: I think it's because a lot of people on Wattpad assume that becoming more popular is equivalent to improving your writing, so they hand out advice designed to propel your work up the popularity charts even if it means actively making your story worse. I got a lot of feedback that was basically "it's fine, but it'd be so much better if you made it a romance, cut all the chapters down to 500 words or less, changed the setting to be more like a modern day high school, added requisite 'mean girl bully' and 'sexy bad boy crush' characters, and made every character 16 years old..." In other words, it'd be much better if it was a completely different story in a completely different genre with completely different characters. Great, thanks!

The worst thing about ratings and reviewing on Wattpad is how fucking pissed people get. Back about 5 years ago I used to do in-depth critiques and reviews just for asking. I'd do like 10+ chapters.

I got screamed at by authors for pointing out horribly obvious mistakes. My two favorites were one author who had their romance teen-lit MC pack her "womb" with towels after she cut herself on a piece of glass on her arm. Not only did she jump me, a bunch of her fans did too. The other one, I pointed out certain facts about the military and how they couldn't expect anyone to believe it, and the author and their fans jumped for it "It's IMAGINARY not real."

Well, then why fucking bother?
Quote:
People were also super weird about my MCs in general. I was advised somewhat frequently to strip away any unique interests, quirks, or goals they had in order to make them more "relatable." Someone once told me that all POV characters should be a blank slate so the audience can project onto them. At that point, you might as well just call them "Y/N" and make the self-insertion element blatant, right?


The self-insertion and "relatable" is one of the most detestable fallouts from the Everyman Theory.

I don't read books to read about myself. I know myself and my life. I want to read about people DIFFERENT than me.

If you can't empathize with someone, maybe the problem is you're a narcissistic sociopath asshole?

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#48

AlexaLee Wrote:
Ralts Wrote: pack her "womb" with towels after she cut herself on a piece of glass on her arm



I’m sorry, what???? I need more details here because I’m truly baffled

The MC cuts herself on a piece of glass, and rushes into the bathroom. She's gushing blood everywhere, and she gets under the sink to 'pack the womb with something' and when she finds the towels, she starts 'packing her womb with the towels to stop the bleeding' because apparently they didn't know that wound isn't spelled womb.


I pointed out "Hey, you have a mis-word here. It should be wound, not womb" and they replied with they knew what they were doing and it was right. I answered that unless that piece of glass that had cut their arm had cut through the abdominal muscle wall, through about 3" of internal organs and gashed open where a baby grows, it wasn't her womb. And if it WAS her womb, she wouldn't be running into the bathroom, she wouldn't be shoving entire towels into her uterus, she would be DYING.

And she called in her fans to screech at me about "Why do you have to be so picky? Let her write her story!" because she was asking for reviews and critiques on one of those teen-lit tragic romance with the creepy rich step-sibling books that everyone was writing a few years back.

She was pretty much one of the main reasons I quit reviewing.

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#49

Ralts Wrote:
AlexaLee Wrote:
Ralts Wrote: pack her "womb" with towels after she cut herself on a piece of glass on her arm



I’m sorry, what???? I need more details here because I’m truly baffled

The MC cuts herself on a piece of glass, and rushes into the bathroom. She's gushing blood everywhere, and she gets under the sink to 'pack the womb with something' and when she finds the towels, she starts 'packing her womb with the towels to stop the bleeding' because apparently they didn't know that wound isn't spelled womb.


I pointed out "Hey, you have a mis-word here. It should be wound, not womb" and they replied with they knew what they were doing and it was right. I answered that unless that piece of glass that had cut their arm had cut through the abdominal muscle wall, through about 3" of internal organs and gashed open where a baby grows, it wasn't her womb. And if it WAS her womb, she wouldn't be running into the bathroom, she wouldn't be shoving entire towels into her uterus, she would be DYING.

And she called in her fans to screech at me about "Why do you have to be so picky? Let her write her story!" because she was asking for reviews and critiques on one of those teen-lit tragic romance with the creepy rich step-sibling books that everyone was writing a few years back.

She was pretty much one of the main reasons I quit reviewing.



Ahahahahahaha oh my! I was trying to work out how they would get a small cut that somehow hit their womb! Oh that’s so funny though! 

Oof sounds like a pretty terrible story tbh!  Sorry about your experience with it!

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#50

Ralts Wrote: I pointed out "Hey, you have a mis-word here. It should be wound, not womb" and they replied with they knew what they were doing and it was right. I answered that unless that piece of glass that had cut their arm had cut through the abdominal muscle wall, through about 3" of internal organs and gashed open where a baby grows, it wasn't her womb. And if it WAS her womb, she wouldn't be running into the bathroom, she wouldn't be shoving entire towels into her uterus, she would be DYING.

That is an utterly fantastic story. I'm crying.

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#54

Ralts Wrote: The self-insertion and "relatable" is one of the most detestable fallouts from the Everyman Theory.

I don't read books to read about myself. I know myself and my life. I want to read about people DIFFERENT than me.

If you can't empathize with someone, maybe the problem is you're a narcissistic sociopath asshole?

Honestly, most of the reason I read is that I want to escape from my life, whether it's because I have a responsibility I want to avoid or that I feel my life is too boring. 

I guess It's easier to have said escape when the person you are reading about is an everyman. 
That's why people get heated when a character does something stupid, or doesn't do something, or does x instead of y.
It's because, whether consciously or subconsciously, they have put themselves into the shoes of the main character. The people the main character meet they meet, when the main character does something that they don't like, they feel like it isn't right. 
Now that I got that out of the way, my thoughts on the everyman.
They are boring.
That's the worst thing that can happen in a story, that it is boring. 
You can get a chuckle out of a story that is bad, look at the 2003 classic, the room.
Some of my fondest memories come from me and the boys sitting down and consuming bad media.
You can never get any enjoyment out of something that's boring.
That's why the worst thing something can be is boring because I came here to be entertained.
The everyman can make choices, because what if somebody doesn't like the choice they make.
The everyman doesn't have a personality, they are passive, they never do anything.
Sure the everyman can have a sad backstory, but you feel no emotion from them.
I read a novel recently, called absolute choice, The novel wasn't good, not by any means.
What drew me in was the personality of the protagonist.
The way he reacted to the situation.
Sure there were too many cliches to count, but this unique character made them new for me.
What I'm trying to say is, who cares about relatability when the character isn't interesting or has no depth.
I hate the everyman, and so should you.
They aren't characters, they are the Y/N In every Wattpad fanfiction, they are the passive reactor, but most of all, they are not you. Sure, you want to have a fantastical adventure like them, but you can't have one. 
Just deal with what you do have, we are living on this earth right now, and there are still so many things to explore, There are billions of planets out there, there are so many different types of people you can meet, we are inventing new things every day, don't you find that so f*cking awesome. Because I do. And I think you should too.

Re: The most negative feedback you’ve ever received

#58
I was once given a feedback in which someone asked why the relatives are 'trying to kill' my heroine and that there's no way a family or clan would ever pressure the child from reporting cases of abuse within the community. In most Asian cultures, me being Asian and coming from a family with Tiger rules (strict study schedules, expectations of perfection, etc)--it is, for the most part, a toxic trait in which numerous parents would either want to 'save face' or not want to start 'trouble' with other clan members/relatives even though what the child has endured--is true and can be proven. It was based off my own personal experience and other Asian friends' experiences too. I was angry at this feedback which the user seems to imply 'Because I have never experienced this, there is no way this type of culture/family structure exist, because I come from a perfect family.' 

In the end, after thinking over the user's feedback, I ignored it. They did nothing to contribute toward bettering my work, and I kept on writing and working on the challenging areas that other people did point out in a helpful manner.