Re: a psychology related question

#1
Have you ever faced a situation where your fan starts to hate you as much as he loved you before?

Once, when I was young, I was fond of a musical group. I bought all their albums, I read all the articles and interviews. I knew the way they lived, their hobbies, the names' of their pets, and cars.
And then, all of a sudden, I disliked them with no reason. I couldn't understand why, but I was fed up with them. I couldn't even listen to their songs. They seemed stupid!

Is it weariness and saturation? Or just the way like our brain works?

P.S. Does it have anything to do with those horror stories of fans attacking the stars?

Re: a psychology related question

#4
I haven't had it with a fan, although I did have one get quite annoyed with me when they asked if they could writre a fanfic and I said I was fine with that as long as it acknowledged my novel and they weren't making money off it. (The novel in question is available for "Pay what you want" on Smashwords.) They ended all contact after that.

I have experienced it from the other side, but there was a reason for it: a very famous fantasy author I once called my favourite, who is known for having characters of various orientations and won a Lambda award for a trilogy that had a major impact on me while I was figuring myself out, turned out to have made some unpleasant comments about her gay MC, had a trans character portrayed in an appallingly transphobic cliche way in a series too dark for my usual tastes, and had a transphobic statement buried in the FAQ on her website. I promptly ditched all her books at the nearest used bookstore and I'm still disgusted at the hypocrisy.

I don't normally get deeply devoted to any author, band, performer, whatever, and I generally don't start to hate them. Drift away and gradually lose interest, maybe. I'm more likely to get passionate about a specific book/world, song/album, movie, or whatever.

Re: a psychology related question

#5
I'm not popular enough for people to hate. If they go off my work they just become neutral.

I can't think of anything I've gone from loving to disliking, unless there's a reason to do so (sometimes a new installment in a story will retroactively ruin the rest for me, or the creator will turn out to be horrible in a way I can't morally support). At most I just get oversaturated on my own obsession and become neutral to it. (Usually this means it just goes dormant and I become obsessed again five years later.)

Re: a psychology related question

#6
(shrugs) I think fans have the right to change their minds. Nothing is permanent anyway. I remember my aunt used to be this self-proclaimed "Diehard" fan of the show "Heroes." But now, if you mention that there is like 3rd or 4th revival of the show, you get no other response from her but to cringe. lol.

I remember being the first in my family to listen to the 1st or 2nd generation kpop bands and getting ridiculed for it. Now I'm getting dagger eyes from my nieces for not enjoying BTS as they do.

Re: a psychology related question

#9

Prysmcat Wrote: I haven't had it with a fan, although I did have one get quite annoyed with me when they asked if they could writre a fanfic and I said I was fine with that as long as it acknowledged my novel and they weren't making money off it. (The novel in question is available for "Pay what you want" on Smashwords.) They ended all contact after that.

I have experienced it from the other side, but there was a reason for it: a very famous fantasy author I once called my favourite, who is known for having characters of various orientations and won a Lambda award for a trilogy that had a major impact on me while I was figuring myself out, turned out to have made some unpleasant comments about her gay MC, had a trans character portrayed in an appallingly transphobic cliche way in a series too dark for my usual tastes, and had a transphobic statement buried in the FAQ on her website. I promptly ditched all her books at the nearest used bookstore and I'm still disgusted at the hypocrisy.

I don't normally get deeply devoted to any author, band, performer, whatever, and I generally don't start to hate them. Drift away and gradually lose interest, maybe. I'm more likely to get passionate about a specific book/world, song/album, movie, or whatever.

Sorry I didn't answer earlier. Hypocrisy is terrible. 

Unfortunately, there is always someone who wants to make money on "popular" (if I may say so) topics, even if they're quite far from the theme...

Fortunately, such people are often got tripped in the little things and it costs them their reputation and good name.
In general, I would like to have fewer such cases.

Re: a psychology related question

#10

batotit Wrote: (shrugs) I think fans have the right to change their minds. Nothing is permanent anyway. I remember my aunt used to be this self-proclaimed "Diehard" fan of the show "Heroes." But now, if you mention that there is like 3rd or 4th revival of the show, you get no other response from her but to cringe. lol.

I remember being the first in my family to listen to the 1st or 2nd generation kpop bands and getting ridiculed for it. Now I'm getting dagger eyes from my nieces for not enjoying BTS as they do.

Thanks for the answer. Your examples are very illustrative.

Yes, you are right, there is nothing permanent in this world. We are changing and our tastes are also transforming. And this is good.

Re: a psychology related question

#11

Derin_Edala Wrote: I'm not popular enough for people to hate. If they go off my work they just become neutral.

I can't think of anything I've gone from loving to disliking, unless there's a reason to do so (sometimes a new installment in a story will retroactively ruin the rest for me, or the creator will turn out to be horrible in a way I can't morally support). At most I just get oversaturated on my own obsession and become neutral to it. (Usually this means it just goes dormant and I become obsessed again five years later.)

It's interesting that you return to your obsession  after a while. Will it be the same thing or a different one?

Re: a psychology related question

#12
Maybe not exactly like this, but I have had sudden realisations that "wow. I've gotten too old for this."

When I say I used to be obsessed with YA fantasy as a teen, I can't really emphasise how deep that obsession ran. It got to a point where I could predict the entire plot of a thing after read the first few chapters, but then I would *eat it up anyway*. Then a few months ago, I tried to read a few novels on my Goodreads list from years back, and realised that I had simply grown out of the genre. Just couldn't derive the same enjoyment. It was heartbreaking.
The reverse HAS happened though. I used to resist being seen as a "normie" with all my strength- I would hate on artists such as Nicki Minaj, Harry Styles or Taylor Swift etc with all the strength I possessed.
Until I listened to pink Friday by accident on a recent commute and three weeks later I can recite every single lyric from that album.

I think it's just down to growing up, honestly. Either if it's realising that what appealed to you as a kid just can't anymore, or maturing enough to understand that desperately paddling against the mainstream just to be contrarian is still mainstream.

Re: a psychology related question

#14

Valery Wrote: Oh, you're right! But I have an excuse ... I was too young!

And there you have your answer. When growing up one's tastes tend to change drastically. Young people tend to obsess with objects, bands, movie/book characters, as means to identify, to find their "place". When you move on, strong feelings of attachment might change to hate out of shame (Why have I ever liked that!?). The best example would be some die-hard Twilight fans who try to re-read their favourite books years later and get a nasty shock.

Re: a psychology related question

#15

Ariana Wrote:
Valery Wrote: Oh, you're right! But I have an excuse ... I was too young!

And there you have your answer. When growing up one's tastes tend to change drastically. Young people tend to obsess with objects, bands, movie/book characters, as means to identify, to find their "place". When you move on, strong feelings of attachment might change to hate out of shame (Why have I ever liked that!?). The best example would be some die-hard Twilight fans who try to re-read their favourite books years later and get a nasty shock.



Yeah, I think this is it. I think these things go through phases

1. You're young, you like something and get really enthusiastic about it
2. You grow, your tastes change, and you find yourself embarrassed by what you used to like and how much you used to like it. You become very vocal in your criticism of it. (Just a feeling, but I think some of the most fiery criticism comes from critics who used to be big fans of the sort of thing they criticize.) 
3. Eventually, you get out of your 'backlash' phase and just accept the work for what it was: something flawed and a product of its time that you enjoyed when you were younger.