Re: I am having a hard time tell the difference between past and present tenses.

#21

Nautilus Wrote:
midnightrainbow Wrote: P.S.  "I lie down" (present) and "I lay down" (past) are not old English. No one will look at you funny if you use the word correctly. However, when you use "I lay down" for present tense, you risk sounding uneducated.

I was referencing that "lay" when used to refer to "lies" in the past, is old English. I thought that was obvious, but here is the clarification.
midnightrainbow Wrote: I pray this kind of bad grammar doesn't become new grammar. When in doubt, just use who.


I swear you read my post, and took the exact opposite meaning away from it.



Sorry, I just wanted to rant about the confusion between "to lie" and "to lay". Everyone's comments got jumbled in my head. Wasn't responding to anyone in particular.

Re: I am having a hard time tell the difference between past and present tenses.

#22
midnightrainbow Wrote: I've seen people try to sound smart by use whom and get it wrong.
Eg.
My friend whom likes to read...
People whom like pineapple on pizza are...

Okay. Just so we know, both of these sentences are an incorrect use of the word WHOM. Anyone who says MY FRIEND WHOM or PEOPLE WHOM is not sounding smart because they are using the word WHOM incorrectly. 

These are the single person pronouns of the English language:

I ME MY MINE
YOU YOUR YOURS
HE HIM HIS
SHE HER HERS ​
WHO WHOM WHOSE

I own a book.
The book belongs to ME.
It is MY book.
The book is MINE.

YOU own a book.
The book belongs to YOU.
It is YOUR book.
The book is YOURS.

HE owns a book.
The book belongs to HIM.
It is HIS book.
The book is HIS.

SHE owns a book.
The book belongs to HER
It is HER book.
The book is HERS.

WHO owns a book?
The book belongs to WHOM?
It is WHOSE book?
The book is WHOSE?

And that is that. Confusion arises due to the fact that although their are four pronouns for when a person is talking about themself (I ME MY MINE) there are only three pronouns for talking about other people, and for some odd reason, the one that gets used twice varies.

YOU YOU your yours
he him HIS HIS
she HER HER hers
who whom WHOSE WHOSE

In the case of WHO and WHOM, further confusion comes from the fact that they are the only personal pronouns that can be used to define a clause, much in the same way that the word THAT can be used.

The person WHO gave the book to me is nice.
The person THAT gave the book to me is nice.

The person TO WHOM I gave the book to is nice.
The person THAT I gave the book to is nice.

This is where confusion lies, because sometimes WHO is used instead of WHOM in a clause, and sometimes either WHO or WHOM is acceptable. Also there are times when the word WHO is used like the word YOU -- as both the subject or the object of a sentence.

He gave YOU the book.
He gave WHO the book?
YOU gave him the book.
WHO gave him the book?

Of odd note is the fact that WHOSE is the only word that can be used to define a possessive clause. No other word can be used.

The person WHOSE book is old.
The book WHOSE owner is old.

❤🦆😸🐰❤

Re: I am having a hard time tell the difference between past and present tenses.

#23
You should go over a grammar book and do some practice problems or worksheets online. I'm guessing English isn't your first language, so any beginner/elementary level grammar book should suffice. Past and present tenses are pretty basic for anyone starting out to learn English to be honest, so I would suggest building a strong foundation before writing a book

Re: I am having a hard time tell the difference between past and present tenses.

#27

BananaRoshan Wrote: How trustworthy is Grammarly anyways in terms of punctuation, word suggestion, and clarity?

The free version is good in punctuation as it is a free feature and it points out if a sentence to long or may be to complicated (But it's restricted in what it will tell you if you don't pay for it). Word suggestion is pretty good, however, if you're looking for word alternatives, you need to pay and I don't know how good it is. Finally for clarity. It only has a bar saying if it easy or people will get it, that's all I know. I flip between two word checkers so I can get reverse features free.