Re: My story is too fast

#1
I have done a couple of review swaps and the most complaints were always about the pace of my story being too fast. I was aware of that problem even before I was told about it but I simply don't know how to fix it. Could I get some help(tips for how to do it) for extending my chapters/writing semi-filler?
If necessary I can make a couple of examples as to where the problem occurs.

Re: My story is too fast

#2
Many times, a story is thought to be too fast if sufficient background to the story isn't included. Try adding some background on the world and characters. However, don't merely do this as a data dump, but add some scenes which will flesh things out. Follow the character around a bit and see how they interact with others and have them engage in conversations which can reveal details about themselves and their world. Also adding some description will deepen the story and provide a break from the narrative. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Re: My story is too fast

#3

parkertallan Wrote: Many times, a story is thought to be too fast if sufficient background to the story isn't included. Try adding some background on the world and characters. However, don't merely do this as a data dump, but add some scenes which will flesh things out. Follow the character around a bit and see how they interact with others and have them engage in conversations which can reveal details about themselves and their world. Also adding some description will deepen the story and provide a break from the narrative. Hope this helps. Good luck.

Thanks a lot!

Re: My story is too fast

#5
For understanding pacing, I often refer to this video:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5LScL4CWe5E&ab_channel=ExtraCredits

It's specifically for video games, but it applies to any kind of story telling.

People need time to process and digest what happened in your story. The easiest way to do so is to give your characters that time too. After a fight, people don't just stand up and go off to the next fight. They cheer, they celebrate, reflect on what happened, tell one another tall stories, go to the nearest tavern to do all those thing or find a quiet place with a loved one to celebrate you're both still alive. Or not. Perhaps it's a somber affair, a solemn memorial of friends that passed away with speeches to send them off gloriously to the afterlife. Or a bit of both. Whatever it is, scenes like that deepen characters and a story and give your readers some time to process everything. After something big happened, stop and catch your breath.

Unless you're at a part of the story where it's supposed to go at breakneck speed. Like all suggestions, there are also situations where you disregard it. It's about choosing the right tool for the job. If you want your readers to feel more tension, shorten the down-time between the excitement

Re: My story is too fast

#6
I've found that I do the same thing when I write, so I've taken a few steps to address it. If you look at some of my earliest work ("Alabaster" and "Onyx," for example), everything's pretty fast-paced. They actually started MUCH faster—I went back and made a second pass at the drafts. I added more detail, described characters' thoughts, and — as Oskatat suggests above — gave them some time to breath, sleep, change clothes, and have a meal. Now, I do that in my outlines. The outline starts with a straight-to-it sequence of the book's action, or the main plot. But then I go back over and over it, adding a subplot, adding another, making some bullet points on "color" to add as I write, and that kind of thing. My outlines wind up as fairly detailed descriptions of what each chapter needs to include, and if I come up with new ideas as I write, I take the time to amend the outline (it also helps me make sure I'm wrapping up all the threads). "Endless Sky: Truthsayer" (it's here on RR if you'd like to look) winds up moving much more deliberately, walking the character into the world, exploring his backstory a bit, and so on.