Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#1
So I've made three stories so far, two have 2k+ views, and another has 700. Those are both healthy counts, but how do I get my story any more viewed than this?
So far my thought process tells me that there are five factors to initial popularity(copy passed from a previous post):
1: Genre-People seem to love litrpg, and fantasy. Thing is, I think writing in niches can get you readers that are more committed(frankly, I'm not so sure anymore).
2: Blurb-If you want to improve, ask for help on the forums. (I think I improved my story's start a ton, but the view count per chapter didn't go up)
3: Writing: this matters the most(I'm sure it does, but as I said, my view count hasn't improved much). You may be a natural at some genres, or your style may just be good, but One way or another, your fundamental skills matter the most.
4: Cover: you can get something simple, but make sure it feels original and has the tone of the story you're writing. (I got a cover, it didn't do too much for me)
5: Reviews: having 4 stars or higher is good enough if you're just starting. However, you want an advanced review to give your readers an idea of what they are reading, as well as get yourself feedback. (I have 4.25 stars, as well as an advanced review)


So all in all, this should be an accurate list, but there's just one issue. This assumes you're playing for the 'latest updates' tab. That'd be fine and good, but that's just a slow and steady stream of like, 6 viewers per chapter released, for me.
It seems that to get a big amount of viewers, you need to get your story to trending, but how does anyone do that in the first place? Let's say that to get there, you need 900 views a day(a lowball) and so far, my most popular story has gained at best 150 in a day. Since it doesn't even have a cover yet, has a possibly lackluster blurb, and has a slightly badly written intro could it possibly increase that much?

Uhh, anyway, I just have two questions. 1: how could I attempt to increase my view counts(on Witch's Psyche) and 2: how does someone even gain the traction needed to get into trending? (I'm not trying to get there anytime soon, and let's pretend the write-a-thon isn't a viable option) 
I'd also like to hear people's thoughts on the first few chapters of Witch's Psyche.
(How the hell did I forget my signature now of all times?!)

Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#3

I Wrote: Uhh... signature???

Agree. If you have an interesting cover and/or blurb, I think there is a good chance another forum visitor will click the link to check out your story.


Review swaps might also help. At the very least there is the reviewer coming in to read your chapters, so your view count should go up from that alone. Just note that there are some 'horror' stories about review swaps going badly, though most of them seem to have worked out from what I can see in terms of the number of reviews have review swap tags on them.

Also, churning out lots of chapters over a short period of time seems to work quite well. Not sure if you have seen the stories by Ex-Soldier Lv 99? The writing and story itself aren't great, but in less than a month he was able to get out well over 100 decent-sized chapters. Similarly for Origin Seeker in it's first month. Sometimes quantity has a quality all of its own...

Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#4
In my experience, better covers are a huge pull. People browsing newest posted are vastly more likely to click on a professional-looking cover.

I experimentally posted a story without a cover for a while, then with a free cover, then with a more serious cover, and there's definitely a big jump up in views with the good one. But ultimately, while a good cover makes a big difference in getting people to click, the story itself is what makes them stay.

Apart from 'be awesome enough that people organically recommend you' I'm not sure what else to suggest. If there's a trick to it, I haven't found it. 

Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#7
Taking a look at blurbs, I like the witch one. Only change is something to make it clear that the circumstance isn't living with an ordinary family. That's kinda tacked to a sentence it doesn't flow from, but this is easily solved separating out sentences. That blurb along with the review properly let me know to expect slice-of-life (and I wouldn't be too worried about that review, it wouldn't dissuade me in the least if that were what I was looking for.)

The other one: I think some people could get confused by the blurb. Is it the author blurb or the narrator blurb? Some people might not even have in mind the difference. It can read too much like an author blurb for a trademark first author. What do you think of doing a strong-voice author voice about "this story is about" then interrupt it with the voice the rest of the thing seems to be written in. Again though, great job letting me know what to expect (did look at first chappy, and I love the chapter titles, they got me to look and confirmed the blurb was in the style of the story and not an author breakdown, lol.) Btw, how you feel about it was an actual question. You have a strong voice and it looks good to keep that.

Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#8

Camhanache Wrote: The other one: I think some people could get confused by the blurb. Is it the author blurb or the narrator blurb? Some people might not even have in mind the difference. It can read too much like an author blurb for a trademark first author. What do you think of doing a strong-voice author voice about "this story is about" then interrupt it with the voice the rest of the thing seems to be written in.


I'm so confused. What's the difference between an 'author' and 'narrator' blurb? Is it that one is addressed as the author and one is addressed as the narrator? If so, how could one possibly think it was an author blurb? -I guess it kinda makes sense that someone might, but since its always written that way, should it be changed?
Also, what do you mean 'some people may not even have in mind the difference'?!
And what in the world is a 'trademark first writer'?!
Camhanache Wrote: (did look at first chappy, and I love the chapter titles, they got me to look and confirmed the blurb was in the style of the story and not an author breakdown, lol.)

What's chappy!? I'm going to guess this means you're dismissing what was said about the blurb?
Also, it's good to know my blurb gives the audience an idea of what to expect.

Camhanache Wrote: What do you think of doing a strong-voice author voice about "this story is about" then interrupt it with the voice the rest of the thing seems to be written in.

I actually did that, with it coming second instead. It didn't do much to me, so I removed it. It was mostly about setting the tone 'this story is somewhat humorous(as can be expected of a story about a renaissance woman going to modern times) but focuses on exploring the characters' psyche in a serious manner' or something like that. 

Also, it seems like you haven't read too much of it, but the world they live in is distinctly different from the real one. For one, magic is rare but normal, and there's a bunch of different kinds(such as the other two main characters' aunt being a fortune reader). This doesn't mean much until way later on, but I'm curious if you're expecting some series about a witches coven and stuff. Oh wait, should I mention that every last witch was killed in a genocidal crusade?! I probably should...

Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#10

Sleepingdragoon Wrote:
Camhanache Wrote: The other one: I think some people could get confused by the blurb. Is it the author blurb or the narrator blurb? Some people might not even have in mind the difference. It can read too much like an author blurb for a trademark first author. What do you think of doing a strong-voice author voice about "this story is about" then interrupt it with the voice the rest of the thing seems to be written in.


I'm so confused. What's the difference between an 'author' and 'narrator' blurb? Is it that one is addressed as the author and one is addressed as the narrator? If so, how could one possibly think it was an author blurb? -I guess it kinda makes sense that someone might, but since its always written that way, should it be changed?
Also, what do you mean 'some people may not even have in mind the difference'?!
And what in the world is a 'trademark first writer'?!
Camhanache Wrote: (did look at first chappy, and I love the chapter titles, they got me to look and confirmed the blurb was in the style of the story and not an author breakdown, lol.)

What's chappy!? I'm going to guess this means you're dismissing what was said about the blurb?
Also, it's good to know my blurb gives the audience an idea of what to expect.

Camhanache Wrote: What do you think of doing a strong-voice author voice about "this story is about" then interrupt it with the voice the rest of the thing seems to be written in.

I actually did that, with it coming second instead. It didn't do much to me, so I removed it. It was mostly about setting the tone 'this story is somewhat humorous(as can be expected of a story about a renaissance woman going to modern times) but focuses on exploring the characters' psyche in a serious manner' or something like that. 

Also, it seems like you haven't read too much of it, but the world they live in is distinctly different from the real one. For one, magic is rare but normal, and there's a bunch of different kinds(such as the other two main characters' aunt being a fortune reader). This doesn't mean much until way later on, but I'm curious if you're expecting some series about a witches coven and stuff. Oh wait, should I mention that every last witch was killed in a genocidal crusade?! I probably should...



To start, I'm not as good at quoting as you but I'll reply to everything in order. Sometimes, the author tells us "this is a [insert genre or description]" and it's clearly a third party perspective from outside the story. That's the author voice/perspective/whatever. Then the third party perspective can be from within the story, meaning it's the narrator. I don't think it was an author blurb and I think it's delivered quite well, actually. Your narrator isn't bland, which is a large part of your fiction, so it's very well-suited, as well.

Some people could be reading, though, wondering "what's the story ABOUT, why is the author telling me there's character growth" and give it a hard pass, mistaking your style for youthful inexperience and exuberance, i.e. being a trade-mark new author akin to ya know, the person who goes around telling people they're a writer? Both of which are a-okay, I think. People start somewhere. And everything has it's own jargon, I meant chapter by chappy I very much just wanted to give comprehensive feedback without the extra effort of transition sentence or, even, full words.

Anyway, reading what you say at the end: How about "This is about exploring the inner life of character's through narrative--hello there, I'm a narrative tool, I'll be guiding you on your journey today" (mine is poorly done but it's in bad form to give specific advice without giving an example, so, example. There.)

As to the other one, you're right about not having read far. (I'm thinking of, though. Just busy.. It does look great!) But nah, I don't need to know that background or lack it to be confused by it, family is just attached to the sentence the same way the "shoes are warm and cheese is tasty" are connected, with the similar subject matter making me strive to wonder how they're connected. Here . . . gonna go look . . . wow this is much simpler than I thought it would be. Add the word "like" directly before living. Just trust me on this, I don't know the name for the exact rule it fits, though. Although the background does let me know I can 100% suggest this, because as is the connection to be made between the clauses is that living with a new family is her new circumstance, in it's entirety. At any rate, the secondary clause actually isn't subordinated, is the issue?

Anyway, I know taking editing tips from someone writing with this lack of cohesion might seem silly, but I'm writing as I'm reading the reply after only scanning it. But . . . responded to everything and all writing has different goals. : )

Re: How to make my story gain more traction.

#11
I'm super confused, maybe it shows something different for you than me?
That whole thing about 'personal growth of characters' was deleted by me like, five days ago. Oh, and I put it in in the first place because I noticed a lot of blurbs written like that seemed to get good amounts of views. As I said, didn't do much for me.

It should say
 "After saving herself from the brink of death through the use of magic gifted to her by a dear friend, a witch called Kait wakes up from stasis hundreds of years later.

She tries to cope with her new circumstances by living with an ordinary family. However, when their drama hits its peak, her unstable emotions cast a spell that causes trouble for them all."

(I edited the thing to say 'by' living with an ordinary family.)
So you seem to think that what's above this is well written and that my narrator has a good voice. 1: could you tell me what makes my narrator's voice unique? 2: what more could I add or change to my description?
Also...what the heck!? Earlier today I had less than 800 views(note that it took me 24 chapters to get to that point) then I release two chapters today because I didn't release one yesterday, and now it is 1024?!
And as a side note, I have a massive thread in assistance requests where I fix up passages people give to me, some of whom are better than me. Criticizing those better than you is a surprisingly and goodly normal thingie. Irony, ey?
I'm also considering removing the 'magic gifted to her from a dear friend' as it isn't relevant or very true now that I have a better idea of what went down.