Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#25
No. That comes later, after its writ, Then I have a chance to cool down reflect, and revise.  If that is not the case with your efforts, there's probably something wrong with you, or you simply never look at what you have written after the first draft is completed. Doesn't mean there are not also times when it is a struggle to get past some tricky prose point, but that's life in the big city.

Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#26
I can only grow to hate something once I've gotten enough experience to figure out what is hateable. At one point I've stopped feeling the anxiety of a certain paragraph or word selection being bad, there's too much I want to write and perfection isn't going to be obtained by endlessly reiterating the same point over and over, based off of vague feelings of something being wrong. Most of the time nothing's wrong, and even if there is something wrong I'm not going to figure it out by obsessing over it.
The only criteria I've figured out for what makes something good is whether or not I can sit down and read through the entire thing and get engaged. My writing does that for me, and I hope it does that for others as well. In the future I'll have a more nuanced understanding of what makes something good, but I'll have to keep writing garbage until I figure what those deeper things are.

Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#28
Oddly, I hate just about everything I write after I have written it. I find myself very bad at fixing drafts because I am unhappy with what I find and try to fix it only to make it worse. I just keep editing until nothing of the original idea is left so I find myself having to force myself to stop rather than force myself to continue forward. To me there’s really nothing quite as bad as having someone read something I wrote aloud. I think it might because I am trying to convince myself I can do better or maybe my view of events changed shortly after.

Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#30
I'm from Scotland so I hate everything by default... Until proven otherwise atleast.

Yet to answer the very poiniant...poinyant? pointant? poeniant?.... My B in GSCE english has finally failed me...
^---------------- I hated writing that line btw if that helps I hate googlin words!

Yes. Typically its the mandatory transition. If you imagine every major event in a story as a checkpoint, sometimes the run up to that checkpoint is so hard to write, your mind is filled with this epic moment and the withdrawl form the previous that running up to it is
SO
F[CENSORED]KIN
HARD
Sometimes I even skip past it and do the major events first and fill in the blanks, yet this leads to having to rewrite chunks as better ideas come forth. That aswell is a pain, as you then look over what you've done and think it sucks, because it doesnt reach the new standard of epicness set.
Theres my five pence on this topic... I am now skint... What a surprise!
But in all seriousness it is too easy to hate a piece of work. I have written a trilogy and even had a publisher interested, yet when I looked over it afterwards I bitterly hated it. Oh my god I hated it. It was so S[CENSORED]t youda thunked it had the amount of work put into its story as a pornographical story. It flipped and flopped back and forth and was utterly horrendous. That got pulled out. I'd say its easier to hate a story when its finished than actually while your writing it.
I would throw in another five pence but now all I have is pocket lint... what is the bullion rate for pocket lint these days?

Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#33
I always agonize over the way I write, but I will always love my story.  I have come to terms that if I keep going back on the same chapter and revise it--I will lose motivation in completing my story.  If I lose interest, how will I ever know the ending?  Writing can be a slow process of growth and discoveries, but how I have experienced it so far is that the more we write, the better we can become.  If we care about becoming better writers, we get everything down and can always go back to make small changes or mental notes on how we can improve when we write a different story next time.  It always helps to look at old writing with a fresh pair of eyes or after reaching the end of your work as well. 

Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#34
Regularly. I go through cycles of despising, then loving, then unsure; repeat. Right now, I love everything. My recently-finished story is great, my just-started story is great, my long-in-progress story is great; everything is awesome!

Knowing me, in another week or two I'll hate it all again. :shrug:

On the whole, I love writing. In general, I love having-finished-things. So when I find myself in a downswing and hating everything about my story and just wanting to leave it for something else, I have to remember that the commitment to the project matters more than the momentary loathing I feel for it and everything related to it.

Re: Do you ever hate what you are writing?

#35

Quote:Do you ever hate what you are writing?



Sort of? It's more of a procedural thing rather than a content thing. 
Basically... 
I'm in the best theatre in the world
with the most comfiest seat
and I am experiencing the greatest movie in the world. 
I'm given a notepad
I can jot things down about the movie
and then when I leave that theatre in my mind, I can try and write the greatest movie in the world from what I can remember (my notes). 

I want to be able to plunk you down and show you the greatest movie ever, the one I saw. I want to share with you all the action and the hope and awe and shock and terror and happiness and passion and love and betrayal and ... every single thing. I want you to be able to feel it as much as I do. To live it as much as I do. To know these characters as I do. 
But I can't. I'm limited in my tools. All I have are my words, and they're often inadequate. They don't convey as well as I want them to. 

Do I hate what I write? 
Sorta. I hate that I can't convey what I want to convey in the way I want to convey it. The only remedy is to get better.