Re: Looking for stories about exploration

#3

Rageguy Wrote: Do you know of any good stories that are about exploring strange worlds? If there are any about the backrooms specifically I'd love to read them but any exploration is up my alley. Yes, I know of the Daily Grind but I'm not interested in reading about hamfisted polyamorous romances, I'm interested in exploration.
it would help a little of you expend on exploration, to nail a story fit for you.


my recommendations:
the salamanders
delve



Re: Looking for stories about exploration

#5

Rageguy Wrote:
emperor Wrote:
Rageguy Wrote: Do you know of any good stories that are about exploring strange worlds? If there are any about the backrooms specifically I'd love to read them but any exploration is up my alley. Yes, I know of the Daily Grind but I'm not interested in reading about hamfisted polyamorous romances, I'm interested in exploration.
it would help a little of you expend on exploration, to nail a story fit for you.

When I mean exploration I mean a story that is focused on showing us an alien and interesting world, usually through the viewpoint of an equally interesting character.

do you mean something like rendezvous with rama? or the moth in god's eye? or astra lost in space?

how aovurh some of the reincarnated as a monster on this site? is something like iron teeth fit?

Re: Looking for stories about exploration

#6
Here's one that explores another world. And it does so from a characters (explorers) perspective. It is a plot driven story, and the plot is not exploration, exploration is just a required feature of the plot. During the tale, its landforms, people, unusual  biome and even economics, governance, and infrastruture are revealed,  you wont find it to be a narrative travelogue, but it is writ in first POV.
https://www.royalroad.com/fiction/30970/a-forgemaster-of-wayland

Re: Looking for stories about exploration

#7

Rageguy Wrote: Do you know of any good stories that are about exploring strange worlds? If there are any about the backrooms specifically I'd love to read them but any exploration is up my alley. Yes, I know of the Daily Grind but I'm not interested in reading about hamfisted polyamorous romances, I'm interested in exploration.


Would this pique your interest?

There’s nothing else of interest to report. Ice covers the planet, nearly two meters thick at the equator, with pools of liquid oxygen and nitrogen boiling beneath a blackened sky. In the days I’ve spent here, I’ve noticed the temperature climb slightly. At this rate, it might be all melted in another decade. I may not be a planetologist, but I’m damn sure that ice ages don’t give up that quickly.

I record my findings in detail, and leave. There is still more to explore.

Five months in. Seventeen probes lost. I’m trying to drown the nagging suspicion that my next jump could suffer a similar fate. The snowball planet is several light years behind me now, and the ship’s survey software is happily informing me that it’s detected a planet with a breathable atmosphere and a warm tropical climate. It’s the same planet, of course - a photonic echo of the world before it suffered an icy cataclysm. The spectrographic analyzer might be smart enough to pick out a habitable world from three light years away, but it’s completely braindead about understanding that I do not want to turn the ship around and go back.

There’s another slightly unsettling thing on my mind. That planet had a high confidence for intelligent life.

Allow me to explain..

The Belters have some really good AI. One example of this, before the Stuttgart came to a stop at the edge of the Patch - an event preceded by every hair on every Belter’s neck standing up on end - was demonstrating a probability model for the location of all stars within the Patch. Given the set of data for all stars in the Milky Way, the region within the Patch was replaced with a null set, and the AI was asked to interpolate the missing data. It did, to a surprisingly accurate degree. Simply studying the statistics of swirling stars, it understood the ebb of bright matter and flow of dark tendrils of cold gas. It guessed where stars should be, and it made a damn accurate picture of the Dead Patch. This wasn’t an off-the-cuff display of their computational power either. They’ve been studying the Patch obsessively. The statistical analysis pointed out several systems that statistically should bear intelligent life, and that model was just as painstakingly accurate as their null set interpolation. And yet - silence.

I turn my attention to this short list of likely-life-bearing worlds, and the Hyperdrive is happy to oblige.

Re: Looking for stories about exploration

#10

Rageguy Wrote:
Shalrath Wrote:
Rageguy Wrote: Do you know of any good stories that are about exploring strange worlds? If there are any about the backrooms specifically I'd love to read them but any exploration is up my alley. Yes, I know of the Daily Grind but I'm not interested in reading about hamfisted polyamorous romances, I'm interested in exploration.


Would this pique your interest?

There’s nothing else of interest to report. Ice covers the planet, nearly two meters thick at the equator, with pools of liquid oxygen and nitrogen boiling beneath a blackened sky. In the days I’ve spent here, I’ve noticed the temperature climb slightly. At this rate, it might be all melted in another decade. I may not be a planetologist, but I’m damn sure that ice ages don’t give up that quickly.

I record my findings in detail, and leave. There is still more to explore.

Five months in. Seventeen probes lost. I’m trying to drown the nagging suspicion that my next jump could suffer a similar fate. The snowball planet is several light years behind me now, and the ship’s survey software is happily informing me that it’s detected a planet with a breathable atmosphere and a warm tropical climate. It’s the same planet, of course - a photonic echo of the world before it suffered an icy cataclysm. The spectrographic analyzer might be smart enough to pick out a habitable world from three light years away, but it’s completely braindead about understanding that I do not want to turn the ship around and go back.

There’s another slightly unsettling thing on my mind. That planet had a high confidence for intelligent life.

Allow me to explain..

The Belters have some really good AI. One example of this, before the Stuttgart came to a stop at the edge of the Patch - an event preceded by every hair on every Belter’s neck standing up on end - was demonstrating a probability model for the location of all stars within the Patch. Given the set of data for all stars in the Milky Way, the region within the Patch was replaced with a null set, and the AI was asked to interpolate the missing data. It did, to a surprisingly accurate degree. Simply studying the statistics of swirling stars, it understood the ebb of bright matter and flow of dark tendrils of cold gas. It guessed where stars should be, and it made a damn accurate picture of the Dead Patch. This wasn’t an off-the-cuff display of their computational power either. They’ve been studying the Patch obsessively. The statistical analysis pointed out several systems that statistically should bear intelligent life, and that model was just as painstakingly accurate as their null set interpolation. And yet - silence.

I turn my attention to this short list of likely-life-bearing worlds, and the Hyperdrive is happy to oblige.
That's some good writing there, is it from a specific story or did you write it just now?
really? i found that personally to be quite bad. for to many reason.

the writing feel like narration of a noir film, except its not a film, and id doesn't work.
it also to slow to read and hard to get the point of what its saying. i got really board of it and could barely finish it.
maybe you like it but for me its like modern "art".