Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#21
I like this rather silly bit of wordplay:


Quote:The train lurched, like it was suddenly dragging an entire herd of pigs.  The affected wheel began to drag and produced an unholy squealing sound, also like it was dragging an entire herd of pigs.




And this bit of culture clash:


Quote:"Are you saying that mage men and woman wear the same things?"

"I don't know what those are."




And I'm rather proud of this little bit of shortcut narration.  It's fun to say a lot without using many words.

Quote:I explained monogamy.


Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#24
I've been having fun adapting common saying to make sense in the post apocalypse I set my story in, they use bottle caps as currency (not my choice) so like "Normally I'd flip a cap." or, "Valkeryie turned the bird on a cap." (any suggestions are most welcome.). But I think my favourite little snippet is...


Quote:“Raiders.” The older man spat into the fire as if to cleanse his mouth of the word.....(cut for this thread) the flickering campfire half illuminating his face. “If one of them comes at you, kill ‘em, you kill a raider you save two lives, yours and the next person they were gonna kill.”

I like this because it one sentence I feel it gives moral justification for the absolute obliteration I have visited upon the raiders, like Nazi's, do want you want to a Nazi


Oh and my lead character lived underground so has pale skin, and is refereed to as a 'pasty-mole-rat-son-of-a-bitch' by the drill instructor Sentinel Grimm, I couldn't resist writing the standard drill instructor, but he actually turned out to be pretty interesting

If you're not familiar with fallout, raiders are like bandits, junkie highway men and mole rats are disgusting creatures that live underground  

Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#26
all my favorite lines are from the visual novel fate stay night: (the 3 movies sucks)

"Shiro, why are you conserving your strength?" "is that all i am to you?"
"i understand, so its not meaningless if i die here"

this are just the ones i remember, and have power to write, there are literally entire scenes that ever single line is my favorite, and full of impact, like the prelude to unleashing the arm in shiro vs barserker.

Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#30
"That morning, a beautiful thing happened. A blessing from the gods themselves. A sign that against a sea of ills, agony, and wails there were still islands of hope to be found in a world slowly but surely slipping out of the hands of mankind as they are chased to the very edges of the earth and all sanity. Against all the world that would consume them in a perfect fire, drown them in the darkest depths of the ocean, crush them between the fiercest mountains, and whip flesh from bone in the most unforgiving storms stood that beautiful nectar to give sanity back to those from whom it had long ago been drained. 


That hallowed black blood to fill any wretched husk and make them a person once more capable of standing on their own two feet and declaring triumphantly before the light of all time that I am alive. I can think. And I shall forge a reminder to all who would doubt that with a smile. 


The coffee was ready to be served, and Omid bore a smile that none could extinguish as he vowed today he would forge that reminder."

In which our protagonist who hasn't had a decent night's sleep in too long and is running on anxiety and waning willpower acquires some coffee so that he can add caffeine to that cocktail right before a very important day.



Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#32

Dubs Wrote: "I am both an angel and a demon. I can turn your life into heaven or hell, but either way you have to die first."

Ooh. Edgy. I like it.



If I had to pick a favorite, it would be the opening paragraph to my story. There are others, but I really enjoy this one:


Quote:"Deep in the Heartlands, there is a little house on a juncture between two small towns. The house is simple: a single door leads into a main room, separated in two parts. The first half of the room is comprised of a sitting area where two chairs reside next to a lit hearth, the few logs within slowly withering away. A small kitchen and dining room make up the latter half, with a stairway leading upstairs to a bedroom for one. The roof is made of straw thatch, the walls of hand-chiseled stone, and the floors of simple oak.

But the crossbow, primed and ready to fire, was made of a dark, seasoned ash wood, and had a skilled hand at the trigger."


Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#33

Quote:Rain snorted. “Hell no. I came to eat and grow strong or die trying. I want the strength to punish those who wronged me. I want to frighten the arrogant and slaughter those who would try to stop me. I want the size to terrify those who I injure so that they never come back... I want to eat this entire tribe.”

Quote:Fear is the prologue to death, best never to read.

Quote:She stormed forward, slimes exploding under her hooves which struck the ground like hammers heavy and swift, each hoof beat beating in time with her heart.



I feel like I'm a contender for the edgiest edge award. You wouldnt think I write stories with some genuinely hysterical scenes from those quotes.

Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#34
Hmm... Mine is more of a paragraph than a quote or a scene. Still, it's something i'd like to think that came out pretty nice.

"I would like to point out, however, that contrary to the general perception, this fight for balance is not all black and white. Light does not mean good, darkness does not mean evil. Good can be done for evil purposes, and evil can be done with good intentions. If you kill someone innocent to save many more innocent lives, would that be an act of good? Would it be evil to kill a hundred innocent people in order to save just one that is very precious to you? One can argue that It depends on a lot of different factors and situations, but ultimately, it is but a simple matter of choice. In most cases, good and evil are subjective; two sides of the same coin. I know this: Darkness can be comforting, while light can be unbearable. Likewise, darkness can drown you, while light can show you the way forward. It is all subjective, and as such, the very definition of balance."

Re: What are your favorite lines from your books?

#36
Quote:This body is a putrid sack; a prison of flesh and bone filled with execrable filth

The first time an angel possessed the MC.

Quote:What a strange feeling, to be caged in a prison of flesh and bone, precariously caught in the cusp between life and death, inexorably marching towards the finality of mortality and yet being utterly incapable of stopping.

The second time the angel possessed the MC.