Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#1
I've been working on a sci-fi novel for an extremely long time, only to find out that theres a huge plothole that's going to shred most of its length away. It cannot be fixed or shaped around without altering the course of the story, and a part of me just wants to keep it in there and not care about it if people notice it because I don't have the will to rewrite everything again. It's how difficult it is to notice that devastates me, but it's still pretty gigantic.  

I dunno why I get so depressed and lose days of sleep over this. Everytime I come back to writing something like this happens, yet I keep quitting and coming back to it. Ugh.

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#5
Stratothrax is right.  You have no idea how many times I've pointed out plot holes in RR fictions or games only for the fanboys to leap to the rescue bending over backwards to "clarify the plot" for me.  I actually don't mind if the author bends over backwards himself to fix a plot hole himself as it appears, but you have to walk the reader through it when the plot hole presents itself in that case.  Fans doing it for you after the fact have no meaning.  Reaching out into the realm of horse-s*** once or twice is fine.  Just don't make a habit of it.  

Don't make a chapter comment, don't put an authors note anywhere.  Just silently fix it.  If someone asks, explain it to them, but authors notes like that can ruin the novel for older readers.  

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#6
Some people like plot holes so much that they make youtube videos on them. Pretty sure they aren't the end of the world.
...Right? 
Unless the plot hole causes the end of the world in your story, in which case I'm technically wrong.
Honestly, I kinda wish I had some interesting plot holes. 
Oh, and for an example. Jojo is absolutely full of plot holes and...I think they're called red herrings? Yeah. Except all of them are unintentional for the most part.
As they always say "Araki forgot"
Hell, even pokemon makes Jojo references.
And a ton of them.
Actually, quite a lot.
But it's dope.
Even the fanart is.
Plot holes aren't the worst thing that could happen.
Sometimes it makes things more interesting, too.
https%3A%2F%2Fi.pinimg.com%2Foriginals%2Fd3%2Ff9%2F0a%2F...4c8ca8.png

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#7

DarkD Wrote: Ever watch "Honest Move Trailers"?  Plot holes are all over the place.  People don't really care that much.  If you care, then plan your fiction better in the future.  You avoid plot holes with planning.  Nothing you can do about this one, so move on.


Learning about writing (or anything really) through honest movie trailers is probably the worst thing you could do. If what you think a plot hole is what that intellectual black hole calls a plot hole, you might have a problem.

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#8

DarkD Wrote: You have no idea how many times I've pointed out plot holes in RR fictions or games only for the fanboys to leap to the rescue bending over backwards to "clarify the plot" for me.


Fans taking the work as their own and coming up with their own theories and explanations for stuff is honestly one of the best parts about writing fiction, and I envy all writers who inspire people's imagination like this. I sincerely wish my readers too tried to "clarify the plot" for each other and speculate. When the author steps down from his authorial ivory tower and declares "this is it!", there's no room left for imagination anymore. That's just lame.

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#9
If you have a general theme and direction, or at least goal for a novel, you right well can rewrite parts of it in order to achieve the flow you seek.  Its all just time and effort, but then, so is starting a new book from scratch.  With good planning, a lot of that can be avoided of course, thus, outlining: its not just for dinner anymore.  That said, there's frustration, then there's your response to it.  Take a deep breath then decide.

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#12
StgBria Wrote: Learning about writing (or anything really) through honest movie trailers is probably the worst thing you could do. If what you think a plot hole is what that intellectual black hole calls a plot hole, you might have a problem.


This so much. I wish so many people will realize while what they say is just for entertainment, but you can't take anything away from them because what they say is hot garbage.

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#14

DarkD Wrote: Stratothrax is right.  You have no idea how many times I've pointed out plot holes in RR fictions or games only for the fanboys to leap to the rescue bending over backwards to "clarify the plot" for me.  I actually don't mind if the author bends over backwards himself to fix a plot hole himself as it appears, but you have to walk the reader through it when the plot hole presents itself in that case.  Fans doing it for you after the fact have no meaning.  Reaching out into the realm of horse-s*** once or twice is fine.  Just don't make a habit of it.  

Don't make a chapter comment, don't put an authors note anywhere.  Just silently fix it.  If someone asks, explain it to them, but authors notes like that can ruin the novel for older readers.

This ^


This is the best! XD ty

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#16

Seerica Wrote: Focus on finishing the first version of your story. Then write another story, better this time.

And readers finiding plot holes is nothing new. For example, in my story, when protag meets another person from their previous world, the thought of *if there's a second, there might be a third* never crossed their mind.

That's not a plothole though?


On the subject of plotholes, I think it is fine for the most part unless it isn't something that makes major parts just not make sense. Readers also have a tendency to call things "plotholes" that aren't. I think one of the main reasons for this is people somehow not understanding that characters can lie, so when things happen they say can't happen, happens, it isn't a plothole.

Not having thought of everything is not a plothole either. Everything yet to be explained is not a plothole either. The reader not understanding how something happened doesn't make it a plothole, it just means you don't get it yet... and sometimes that's fine. The only issue with this, is that then readers begin making their own theories, and then the author then actually explains it and it doesn't fit the fan theory, people think it's a mistake because it contradicts the fan theory? (yes, I have seen this happen on my fiction.)

Re: Huge plothole in book and I'm completely devastated.

#19
I know how this feels. I got pretty far into my current project recently and was writing an action-ish scene and then realized I did something dumb...

I forgot to give the characters weapons in the early chapters.... See, I'm writing a story where weapons are needed eventually, you'd think it would be one of the first things I would work out when introducing the characters, but somehow it slipped by... 

Made me feel completely stupid when I realized it. Like why would these characters knowingly go into a dangerous place without weapons?

My plot hole doesn't sound as serious as yours, but realizing I did this left me feeling pretty bummed about it because I realized all the work I would need to do to fix it. Just stick with it and keep writing. Make a personal note somewhere that the plot hole exists and keep going forward. Eventually you might find an opportunity to explain the plot hole away in the future or turn it into an opportunity to do some cool thing with the plot. If the plot hole isn't that big of a deal and most readers don't notice, then power on. If the plot hole is serious, then do the same and finish the version with the plot hole. Even if you have to scrap most of the content because of the plot hole, what you've written can still be recycled.