Re: How do you create your stories?

#81
Huh... I've never really thought about it. I guess I start with a basic concept of many different characters, then choose bits from those many characters into one. Like a build-a-bear but if you ripped people apart and sowed them back together. The personality of the character makes up the motive. I have created over 50 character bios and haven't used a single one. So if I need a new character I go over my shopping list and find a suitable character. In addition to this, I spend time finding a name for the character that sums up the character which means I spend an hour to days finding the perfect name.
For world building... it's also basic. I find an era I like and a type of city and copy it. Then I swap ideas around like for example I want a futuristic town but also be primitive looking at the same time. I... um... basic houses and structures with complex... who am I kidding I just make up shit as I go along and try not create inconsistency with a vague idea.
I go through multiple types of checkers, spelling, grammar, tone, sentence structures, and sometimes look up words to use instead. Sometimes I feel like an incompetent writer who can only do essays but when it comes to creating a story I'm a fish drowning in water. Also I'm a perfectionist and in constant state of anxiety which doesn't help cause I can't appreciate my work.
I create mini chapters in my head and find a way to fit in the story. But I also can't focus on one story which means it takes time to write out my ideas or I write them down weeks later.
So I start out with a generic story line then find characters to fit it, or create characters and find a story to find around them. As I'm writing I forgot what I was talking about some I'll move on. 

****

Ok, I'm back after an hour of thinking over the question again. So basically I come up with all of what was previously stated then write down my story letting my brain take over. Then I have to change it up because sometimes I don't write down how the character would've responded in the situation or it is too weird to the point where I either change the rating of my story or just drop the part. Then if I want lore or have lore/world building I create a separate story that is a collection of random stories which don't work with each other to later implement into story or end up become an individual story which may or may not take part in that same universe that came into being because I found a way to expand on the story. Which happened to my first story. (Also I have like 10 or 20 story ideas I created hiding somewhere if I ever decide to create new stories). I just realized all of my stories came from and idea I had almost seven years ago. Now I feel old.
Maybe all of what I said contradicts myself but that how I write my stories. I don't know what happens during key points and I also now started separating my stories into five acts that I call; Act 1 establishing all of the boring stuff and characters, Act 2 screwing around until I find a suitable way to naturally enter into the third act, Act 3 something critical (or a place that's meant to happen in the story but I just wanted to screw around until I got there), Act 4 more screwing around but works towards something, Act 5 the drama of drama, the end to all ends, no but this is the part whether I decide to make a sequel or say it looks alright and leave things off even if there is no conclusion.
Some of you noticed that hey that's jut the three act structure but just with more steps.... I'm not sorry.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#82
For me, it is quite weird to create stories out of my dreams or using other works models when I was a teenager or in middle school. One time, I even tried to create a story about a teenage girl in Brighton which has become a Vewolf-Human, a werewolf species which is vegetarian and helps people and joining a squad of bounty hunters or hunters who are taking the monsters from our world and send it back, in happy cases (others get killed if they oppress the arrest like attacking someone from their team or trying it to escape from their jail while they are waiting for the verdict). And that got scratched so many times, I have created from the ground but using the same elements.
And now, the technique I use it is progress writing, first, do a small start and not explains much, and then, while you are working on the story, it will become complex and bigger every chapter you are writing. But just in case, take a notebook, and note every important thing for the future such as a character who is terrible at cooking, a rivalry between someone and also some secrets which might be revealed later.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#83

oscblade Wrote:
Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote: I know I am late to the game on this topic. However, your way of creating stories is similar to my way that I recently started to do with my new idea. I use to just start with a genre and the main character. Then I would delve into the world that I wanted this story to live in and come up with a rough idea of where I want to lead the story, what I want the plot to be, and so on. Yet, as I would write my ideas out and create the story I have come up with I found my characters to be too shallow and my villains were even worse than my main character. 

I then started to think differently after reading a few good novels with great characters and plots and so on. I also gained inspiration from Avengers movies especially when Thanos in them. I realized that I need to first flesh out my main character a lot more and not just try to make up his or her personality as I wrote the story. On top of that, I needed to also flesh out the villain (if I have one in said story) just as much if not more than the main character. This is pretty much the most important part in my opinion and I feel figuring out the villain of the story is even more important than the main character because the antagonist can make or break a story. For example, though Thanos is very bad and whatnot with his actions if you break down his reasoning you as the viewer can even start to understand his point of view and could find yourself agreeing to an extent. 

I bring this up because I have read so many stories or seen movies with villains who are bad just because and all they want to do is destroy for no other reason because they want to. To me, that is boring and makes the plot and struggle of the story uninteresting and just dumb. 

Anyway, I said all this to say that my new way of coming up with and creating a story starts with figuring out who the main character/s are and the antagionist/s are. Then I leave the main character alone for a bit and focus on the villain and ask myself why is he/she the villain? How did they get to become this way and how did their plans lead them to do whatever their goal is? Pretty much what is the back story for this villain? Because every villain needs a back story even if it's never told. Next, I look at my main character and ask myself who they are in this world, in my most recent story that I am starting to write my main character is an orphan who has a dream to be a mage since that would change his fate from that of a nobody to that of a somebody. Then I look at the other minor characters that will be important to the story overall and think up realistic enough reason for them to be in the story and if I can not think up a reason than I toss them out or make them an even smaller side character that is only there for a moment. Last I go back to my usual style and begin building the world this story lives in and the rules that govern it, at least the top layer of everything since I like to have some ideas and information to come to me as I write the chapters. 

Well, that's pretty much it, there are things that I still need to learn and get help on when creating my story but this is at least how I come up with a story idea. I create a villain and hero and figure out how their fates intertwine.

Thank you for sharing your experience.
I have noticed that when I write my books, I often find negative characters more interesting than the main character.
It may be strange, but it is the "bad" characters who  make the story more  interesting, the "good" ones are usually very boring ))

I wouldn't say that the mc is always boring, but that they are usually predictable in their actions. But ya a good villian is usually more interesting. But that's only if they are written well otherwise they to become boring. But if you write a great villian that ties in well then it can force the mc to make unpredictable actions which makes the less boring. Also a good "side kick" could make the mc and his interactions more interesting.



This is incredible!
You've created a character bank and can now use it to create a story at any time. I think I'll borrow this idea from you. I never thought of anything like that! And this is a super life hack.

And I'll probably copy and save what you wrote. I think you could write a great guide to creating books.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#84

Septic Wrote: For me, it is quite weird to create stories out of my dreams or using other works models when I was a teenager or in middle school. One time, I even tried to create a story about a teenage girl in Brighton which has become a Vewolf-Human, a werewolf species which is vegetarian and helps people and joining a squad of bounty hunters or hunters who are taking the monsters from our world and send it back, in happy cases (others get killed if they oppress the arrest like attacking someone from their team or trying it to escape from their jail while they are waiting for the verdict). And that got scratched so many times, I have created from the ground but using the same elements.
And now, the technique I use it is progress writing, first, do a small start and not explains much, and then, while you are working on the story, it will become complex and bigger every chapter you are writing. But just in case, take a notebook, and note every important thing for the future such as a character who is terrible at cooking, a rivalry between someone and also some secrets which might be revealed later.



I really liked the concept of the story about the werewolf girl, and about the hunters who were so empathetic that they tried not to kill the werewolves, but to send them back to their world. I've seen similar ideas in Hayao Miyazaki's cartoons. Thank you for sharing your method of creating stories))

Re: How do you create your stories?

#85

Septic Wrote: For me, it is quite weird to create stories out of my dreams or using other works models when I was a teenager or in middle school. One time, I even tried to create a story about a teenage girl in Brighton which has become a Vewolf-Human, a werewolf species which is vegetarian and helps people and joining a squad of bounty hunters or hunters who are taking the monsters from our world and send it back, in happy cases (others get killed if they oppress the arrest like attacking someone from their team or trying it to escape from their jail while they are waiting for the verdict). And that got scratched so many times, I have created from the ground but using the same elements.
And now, the technique I use it is progress writing, first, do a small start and not explains much, and then, while you are working on the story, it will become complex and bigger every chapter you are writing. But just in case, take a notebook, and note every important thing for the future such as a character who is terrible at cooking, a rivalry between someone and also some secrets which might be revealed later.



I really liked the concept of the story about the werewolf girl, and about the hunters who were so empathetic that they tried not to kill the werewolves, but to send them back to their world. I've seen similar ideas in Hayao Miyazaki's cartoons. Thank you for sharing your method of creating stories))

Re: How do you create your stories?

#86

Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote:
Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote: I know I am late to the game on this topic. However, your way of creating stories is similar to my way that I recently started to do with my new idea. I use to just start with a genre and the main character. Then I would delve into the world that I wanted this story to live in and come up with a rough idea of where I want to lead the story, what I want the plot to be, and so on. Yet, as I would write my ideas out and create the story I have come up with I found my characters to be too shallow and my villains were even worse than my main character. 

I then started to think differently after reading a few good novels with great characters and plots and so on. I also gained inspiration from Avengers movies especially when Thanos in them. I realized that I need to first flesh out my main character a lot more and not just try to make up his or her personality as I wrote the story. On top of that, I needed to also flesh out the villain (if I have one in said story) just as much if not more than the main character. This is pretty much the most important part in my opinion and I feel figuring out the villain of the story is even more important than the main character because the antagonist can make or break a story. For example, though Thanos is very bad and whatnot with his actions if you break down his reasoning you as the viewer can even start to understand his point of view and could find yourself agreeing to an extent. 

I bring this up because I have read so many stories or seen movies with villains who are bad just because and all they want to do is destroy for no other reason because they want to. To me, that is boring and makes the plot and struggle of the story uninteresting and just dumb. 

Anyway, I said all this to say that my new way of coming up with and creating a story starts with figuring out who the main character/s are and the antagionist/s are. Then I leave the main character alone for a bit and focus on the villain and ask myself why is he/she the villain? How did they get to become this way and how did their plans lead them to do whatever their goal is? Pretty much what is the back story for this villain? Because every villain needs a back story even if it's never told. Next, I look at my main character and ask myself who they are in this world, in my most recent story that I am starting to write my main character is an orphan who has a dream to be a mage since that would change his fate from that of a nobody to that of a somebody. Then I look at the other minor characters that will be important to the story overall and think up realistic enough reason for them to be in the story and if I can not think up a reason than I toss them out or make them an even smaller side character that is only there for a moment. Last I go back to my usual style and begin building the world this story lives in and the rules that govern it, at least the top layer of everything since I like to have some ideas and information to come to me as I write the chapters. 

Well, that's pretty much it, there are things that I still need to learn and get help on when creating my story but this is at least how I come up with a story idea. I create a villain and hero and figure out how their fates intertwine.

Thank you for sharing your experience.
I have noticed that when I write my books, I often find negative characters more interesting than the main character.
It may be strange, but it is the "bad" characters who  make the story more  interesting, the "good" ones are usually very boring ))

I wouldn't say that the mc is always boring, but that they are usually predictable in their actions. But ya a good villian is usually more interesting. But that's only if they are written well otherwise they to become boring. But if you write a great villian that ties in well then it can force the mc to make unpredictable actions which makes the less boring. Also a good "side kick" could make the mc and his interactions more interesting.



This is incredible!
You've created a character bank and can now use it to create a story at any time. I think I'll borrow this idea from you. I never thought of anything like that! And this is a super life hack.

And I'll probably copy and save what you wrote. I think you could write a great guide to creating books.

Wow thanks its just what I have learned from trial and error and from pretty much read like over 100 books. I never considered being able to write a guide book but maybe one day in the future after finishing my current story I will do some research and try my hand at that. It sounds like a fun and challenging endeavor so thanks for the encouragement and idea. I am glad what I wrote can help you and please do feel free to keep it and make it your own. 

I tell you though coming up with an idea is the easy part for me at least and even crafting the details for my characters and the world they live in. What I tend to struggle with is actually writing the chapters. What I mean is that even though I know the plot of the story and gist of the adventure and challenges my character will face through the story as they head to that plot. I tend to get writers block on how each chapter should be written to facilitate the overall story and lead my character forward in the plot. I am thinking that I need to break down every chapter and figure out their induvial plot or purpose before even writing or at least create milestones for my story that need to be hit every 3 to 5 chapters so that when I write my chapters that are not well thought out I least have a goal as to where I am leading my character and the story in the next few chapters. What do you think about my idea and issue? Do you have anything that works for because I would love to know?

Re: How do you create your stories?

#87

Jon Wrote:
Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote:
Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote: I know I am late to the game on this topic. However, your way of creating stories is similar to my way that I recently started to do with my new idea. I use to just start with a genre and the main character. Then I would delve into the world that I wanted this story to live in and come up with a rough idea of where I want to lead the story, what I want the plot to be, and so on. Yet, as I would write my ideas out and create the story I have come up with I found my characters to be too shallow and my villains were even worse than my main character. 

I then started to think differently after reading a few good novels with great characters and plots and so on. I also gained inspiration from Avengers movies especially when Thanos in them. I realized that I need to first flesh out my main character a lot more and not just try to make up his or her personality as I wrote the story. On top of that, I needed to also flesh out the villain (if I have one in said story) just as much if not more than the main character. This is pretty much the most important part in my opinion and I feel figuring out the villain of the story is even more important than the main character because the antagonist can make or break a story. For example, though Thanos is very bad and whatnot with his actions if you break down his reasoning you as the viewer can even start to understand his point of view and could find yourself agreeing to an extent. 

I bring this up because I have read so many stories or seen movies with villains who are bad just because and all they want to do is destroy for no other reason because they want to. To me, that is boring and makes the plot and struggle of the story uninteresting and just dumb. 

Anyway, I said all this to say that my new way of coming up with and creating a story starts with figuring out who the main character/s are and the antagionist/s are. Then I leave the main character alone for a bit and focus on the villain and ask myself why is he/she the villain? How did they get to become this way and how did their plans lead them to do whatever their goal is? Pretty much what is the back story for this villain? Because every villain needs a back story even if it's never told. Next, I look at my main character and ask myself who they are in this world, in my most recent story that I am starting to write my main character is an orphan who has a dream to be a mage since that would change his fate from that of a nobody to that of a somebody. Then I look at the other minor characters that will be important to the story overall and think up realistic enough reason for them to be in the story and if I can not think up a reason than I toss them out or make them an even smaller side character that is only there for a moment. Last I go back to my usual style and begin building the world this story lives in and the rules that govern it, at least the top layer of everything since I like to have some ideas and information to come to me as I write the chapters. 

Well, that's pretty much it, there are things that I still need to learn and get help on when creating my story but this is at least how I come up with a story idea. I create a villain and hero and figure out how their fates intertwine.

Thank you for sharing your experience.
I have noticed that when I write my books, I often find negative characters more interesting than the main character.
It may be strange, but it is the "bad" characters who  make the story more  interesting, the "good" ones are usually very boring ))

I wouldn't say that the mc is always boring, but that they are usually predictable in their actions. But ya a good villian is usually more interesting. But that's only if they are written well otherwise they to become boring. But if you write a great villian that ties in well then it can force the mc to make unpredictable actions which makes the less boring. Also a good "side kick" could make the mc and his interactions more interesting.



This is incredible!
You've created a character bank and can now use it to create a story at any time. I think I'll borrow this idea from you. I never thought of anything like that! And this is a super life hack.

And I'll probably copy and save what you wrote. I think you could write a great guide to creating books.

Wow thanks its just what I have learned from trial and error and from pretty much read like over 100 books. I never considered being able to write a guide book but maybe one day in the future after finishing my current story I will do some research and try my hand at that. It sounds like a fun and challenging endeavor so thanks for the encouragement and idea. I am glad what I wrote can help you and please do feel free to keep it and make it your own. 

I tell you though coming up with an idea is the easy part for me at least and even crafting the details for my characters and the world they live in. What I tend to struggle with is actually writing the chapters. What I mean is that even though I know the plot of the story and gist of the adventure and challenges my character will face through the story as they head to that plot. I tend to get writers block on how each chapter should be written to facilitate the overall story and lead my character forward in the plot. I am thinking that I need to break down every chapter and figure out their induvial plot or purpose before even writing or at least create milestones for my story that need to be hit every 3 to 5 chapters so that when I write my chapters that are not well thought out I least have a goal as to where I am leading my character and the story in the next few chapters. What do you think about my idea and issue? Do you have anything that works for because I would love to know?



To be honest, I feel a little ashamed after your answer, because I don't work as hard on my characters as you do. It's time to learn it, and I'll do it. I really liked the idea of interviewing my characters. I intend to do this soon, at least try it))) I think this will allow me to better identify their motivations and goals

Re: How do you create your stories?

#88

Silvia Wrote:
Jon Wrote:
Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote:
Silvia Wrote:
oscblade Wrote: I know I am late to the game on this topic. However, your way of creating stories is similar to my way that I recently started to do with my new idea. I use to just start with a genre and the main character. Then I would delve into the world that I wanted this story to live in and come up with a rough idea of where I want to lead the story, what I want the plot to be, and so on. Yet, as I would write my ideas out and create the story I have come up with I found my characters to be too shallow and my villains were even worse than my main character. 

I then started to think differently after reading a few good novels with great characters and plots and so on. I also gained inspiration from Avengers movies especially when Thanos in them. I realized that I need to first flesh out my main character a lot more and not just try to make up his or her personality as I wrote the story. On top of that, I needed to also flesh out the villain (if I have one in said story) just as much if not more than the main character. This is pretty much the most important part in my opinion and I feel figuring out the villain of the story is even more important than the main character because the antagonist can make or break a story. For example, though Thanos is very bad and whatnot with his actions if you break down his reasoning you as the viewer can even start to understand his point of view and could find yourself agreeing to an extent. 

I bring this up because I have read so many stories or seen movies with villains who are bad just because and all they want to do is destroy for no other reason because they want to. To me, that is boring and makes the plot and struggle of the story uninteresting and just dumb. 

Anyway, I said all this to say that my new way of coming up with and creating a story starts with figuring out who the main character/s are and the antagionist/s are. Then I leave the main character alone for a bit and focus on the villain and ask myself why is he/she the villain? How did they get to become this way and how did their plans lead them to do whatever their goal is? Pretty much what is the back story for this villain? Because every villain needs a back story even if it's never told. Next, I look at my main character and ask myself who they are in this world, in my most recent story that I am starting to write my main character is an orphan who has a dream to be a mage since that would change his fate from that of a nobody to that of a somebody. Then I look at the other minor characters that will be important to the story overall and think up realistic enough reason for them to be in the story and if I can not think up a reason than I toss them out or make them an even smaller side character that is only there for a moment. Last I go back to my usual style and begin building the world this story lives in and the rules that govern it, at least the top layer of everything since I like to have some ideas and information to come to me as I write the chapters. 

Well, that's pretty much it, there are things that I still need to learn and get help on when creating my story but this is at least how I come up with a story idea. I create a villain and hero and figure out how their fates intertwine.

Thank you for sharing your experience.
I have noticed that when I write my books, I often find negative characters more interesting than the main character.
It may be strange, but it is the "bad" characters who  make the story more  interesting, the "good" ones are usually very boring ))

I wouldn't say that the mc is always boring, but that they are usually predictable in their actions. But ya a good villian is usually more interesting. But that's only if they are written well otherwise they to become boring. But if you write a great villian that ties in well then it can force the mc to make unpredictable actions which makes the less boring. Also a good "side kick" could make the mc and his interactions more interesting.



This is incredible!
You've created a character bank and can now use it to create a story at any time. I think I'll borrow this idea from you. I never thought of anything like that! And this is a super life hack.

And I'll probably copy and save what you wrote. I think you could write a great guide to creating books.

Wow thanks its just what I have learned from trial and error and from pretty much read like over 100 books. I never considered being able to write a guide book but maybe one day in the future after finishing my current story I will do some research and try my hand at that. It sounds like a fun and challenging endeavor so thanks for the encouragement and idea. I am glad what I wrote can help you and please do feel free to keep it and make it your own. 

I tell you though coming up with an idea is the easy part for me at least and even crafting the details for my characters and the world they live in. What I tend to struggle with is actually writing the chapters. What I mean is that even though I know the plot of the story and gist of the adventure and challenges my character will face through the story as they head to that plot. I tend to get writers block on how each chapter should be written to facilitate the overall story and lead my character forward in the plot. I am thinking that I need to break down every chapter and figure out their induvial plot or purpose before even writing or at least create milestones for my story that need to be hit every 3 to 5 chapters so that when I write my chapters that are not well thought out I least have a goal as to where I am leading my character and the story in the next few chapters. What do you think about my idea and issue? Do you have anything that works for because I would love to know?



To be honest, I feel a little ashamed after your answer, because I don't work as hard on my characters as you do. It's time to learn it, and I'll do it. I really liked the idea of interviewing my characters. I intend to do this soon, at least try it))) I think this will allow me to better identify their motivations and goals

Don't feel ashamed, I only work that way because it helps me. Everyone has different approaches to how they write from what I have learned. Some people like me try to develop every detail before they write (though I do fail at times at this and end up switching to just figuring out as I go) and others figure out their characters and plots as they go. Just like people write their stories and first or third pov there is not one right way to go about. Just finding out what works for you is all that matters. 

Re: How do you create your stories?

#89
For me it was a messy jump around. Since being human mostly elude me, I usually begin with concept. 

1. Figuring story I want to tell.
This is the genre, the tags,the first/third person view. Here I decide the setting, the final big climax, and the possible plot twist.

2. Collecting cool Arc
Since I prefer the story to be a world of their own, I love to fill my story with a 'cool arc(S)'. This is mostly done by listing thing that I think cool. Jotted it down in my phone memo app and develop an arc from there.

3.Pre-writing
This is where I decide what each chapter should be about. Whose POV will it be? What kind of tone it will take? Sarcastic? Jolly? Desperate? Grim?

4.Writing
I just write... this is the hardest part for me. Because I tend to write three sentences before decide that it need to be re-done. 

On this point you could see me open at least 10 other tabs. Google translate in case I forget the parallel from my native to english, thesaurus so it doesn't sound dryly repetitive, at least three guides on that particular section (how to write a good dialogue, how to show and not tell, how to write a gripping narrative.), a guide on good sentence structure, google images reference if it need architectural stuff like building, and of course search page literred with technical tidbit; material of road construction, process of translating totally unknown language, and dnd player handbook.

On this process is also where I pop character based on the need of the plot. Decide their surface level personality matrix and giving them background-motivation (so they won't fall flat/two-dimensional). And If I'm lucky, getting them a unique speech mannerism so I don't need to add John said or replied Mary.

My goal is to make the character take life of their own. Means I set the plot, the setting, the big bad thing that happened. However the response, the reflex, and what the characters thought and felt should be done by the characters themselves. I don't think I could ever reach that level, but I tried.

5. Revising
After finishing one chapter, I'd revise it for tone, plot, and sentences consistency. I mix and match several preceding and suceeding sentence so it sound better. It might seems harsh, but I demand prose perfect from myself. Sometimes I would stuck for hours figuring the alliteration that just work.

I tried to learn about meter/rythm but I'm not English Major trained so I kind give it up on them.

***

I think thats all about it. Currently I was pacing myself at around 500-700 words/day.

Thanks.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#91

Sethrax4 Wrote: Short answer: Hatred. 

Long Answer: I get certain scenes/concepts in my head and I try to build a story around them within existing lore. The lore has been created from years of writing and rewriting (I delete earlier versions of the lore as new epiphanies come through). I have various settings and I hate... HATE stories with expositions and "Origin" sequences which always amount to (X) god/God/gods created the universe, it's like the most thoughtless way to start a story, no really, next to no effort put into the lore. I stop reading the stories when I see exposition or if there's universe origin junk. 

In my stories time just keeps going infinitely, every saga picks up after one before it ad infinitum. Is it cyclical? yes, but even within cycles there's potential for difference, like "what if Zander betrayed Set-Ahrn sooner and thus the Rethstal was never built?". Sagas are set apart by distinct setting, in 'The Fallen Saga' for example, the setting was celestial strips which formed as a result of spillover ante-aeonics from the infinite aether. In 'The Sins Saga', the setting is a huge artificial space several lightyears in size (Rethstal). Sagas can overlap in time, for example; 'Chroma' from 'Fallen Saga' Takes place around the same time as 'Symposium of Dreams' in the 'Sins Saga'. 

I hate magic, magic is the ultimate cop-out to actually explain why certain things take place, you know in ancient times people used to think pneumatics was magic. 

But Its not that awe-inspiring things can't happen, there just need to be more complexity than "lol, magic". Take 'The force' from 'Star Wars' or 'Magicka' from 'The Elder Scrolls', although you could argue they're not real but the intricacies of them make them tempting to believe. 
Same goes for "lol, science".  

So the question now is; I have a lore, how do I integrate that into the story? Short answer; I don't. It sounds conflicting but I just don't explain everything at every given moment, instead I have placeholders, which are just hints to what's really going on. Ultimately I decided that lore-books are better for clarifying the story rather than having wiki-entries every five paragraphs, plus the mystery gives room for better imagination, when everything is explained, nothing is magical.       

Short answer: hatred. 

https%3A%2F%2Fimages-wixmp-ed30a86b8c4ca887773...f0xiDNpp8o



Perhaps your answer is the most original and confusing (probably due to the fact that I have a lack of knowledge in certain fields) 
I've reread it several times. Thank you for sharing your experience with us. I think you are a very educated person.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#92

CookieCrumble Wrote: For me it was a messy jump around. Since being human mostly elude me, I usually begin with concept. 

1. Figuring story I want to tell.
This is the genre, the tags,the first/third person view. Here I decide the setting, the final big climax, and the possible plot twist.

2. Collecting cool Arc
Since I prefer the story to be a world of their own, I love to fill my story with a 'cool arc(S)'. This is mostly done by listing thing that I think cool. Jotted it down in my phone memo app and develop an arc from there.

3.Pre-writing
This is where I decide what each chapter should be about. Whose POV will it be? What kind of tone it will take? Sarcastic? Jolly? Desperate? Grim?

4.Writing
I just write... this is the hardest part for me. Because I tend to write three sentences before decide that it need to be re-done. 

On this point you could see me open at least 10 other tabs. Google translate in case I forget the parallel from my native to english, thesaurus so it doesn't sound dryly repetitive, at least three guides on that particular section (how to write a good dialogue, how to show and not tell, how to write a gripping narrative.), a guide on good sentence structure, google images reference if it need architectural stuff like building, and of course search page literred with technical tidbit; material of road construction, process of translating totally unknown language, and dnd player handbook.

On this process is also where I pop character based on the need of the plot. Decide their surface level personality matrix and giving them background-motivation (so they won't fall flat/two-dimensional). And If I'm lucky, getting them a unique speech mannerism so I don't need to add John said or replied Mary.

My goal is to make the character take life of their own. Means I set the plot, the setting, the big bad thing that happened. However the response, the reflex, and what the characters thought and felt should be done by the characters themselves. I don't think I could ever reach that level, but I tried.

5. Revising
After finishing one chapter, I'd revise it for tone, plot, and sentences consistency. I mix and match several preceding and suceeding sentence so it sound better. It might seems harsh, but I demand prose perfect from myself. Sometimes I would stuck for hours figuring the alliteration that just work.

I tried to learn about meter/rythm but I'm not English Major trained so I kind give it up on them.

***

I think thats all about it. Currently I was pacing myself at around 500-700 words/day.

Thanks.



Thanks. You have described all the steps very clearly. And yes, I agree with you that writing not in your native language is quite a difficult job and a challenge.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#94

AliceBSullivan Wrote: My niche is apocalyptic fiction, so I usually pick what type of apocalyptic setting I want, then create a character or a set of characters. After that, I decide what the goals would be and what message, if I want there to be one, will be for the story. I either create antagonists or leave the setting to be the antagonist alone.



So, at first, you create settings, and only then characters. It's interesting

Re: How do you create your stories?

#95
1. Get an idea.
2. Spend sleepless evenings pondering about it while I should be sleeping
3. Write it down and realize it's not enough to build a story from. 
4. Rinse and repeat until I've got enough stuff to fill a story
5. Realize the pieces don't fit together because they're just random scenes in a very rough chronoligical-ish order
6. Try to pantser-write it anyway
7. Give up on that idea because it sucks.
8. Admit that I write better with a story structure, load the Save The Cat beat sheet
9. Get rid of 90% of the story because it doesn't fit the form
10. Pick the remaining 10% and get to work
11. Suffer
12. ???
13. Success

Re: How do you create your stories?

#97
I collect a variety of ideas that appeal to me - character ideas, plot ideas, setting ideas - all little fragments that over time I fit together in strange ways until they reach a critical mass.

For example I'd had the idea "What if an ultra-conservative girl got kidnapped/rescued from her uber-religious family/society by someone completely opposite, perhaps with magical powers the MC's entire culture see as 'evil'?"  (from reading a lot of fundie snark)  And then I combined that with some other ideas I'd had for a magic system and some kinda solar/steam technology ideas I'd had for a setting and then over a couple of years developed a bunch of other ideas and concepts and villain motivations and interactions that could attach to it and fill it out and allow for what I hope is a really interesting journey.

Also I sometimes take inspiration from memes, songs, and meme songs.  And try to hide references in non-obvious ways.  (And not in blantant boring 'nostalgia' lists.  *cough*earnestcline*cough*)

Edit: oh and in turning those ideas into a story and deciding which ones serve it properly I figure out the theme and related imagery and how various concepts and characters explore and exhibit various aspects of that theme.

Re: How do you create your stories?

#98

Llamadragon Wrote: 1. Get an idea.
2. Spend sleepless evenings pondering about it while I should be sleeping
3. Write it down and realize it's not enough to build a story from. 
4. Rinse and repeat until I've got enough stuff to fill a story
5. Realize the pieces don't fit together because they're just random scenes in a very rough chronoligical-ish order
6. Try to pantser-write it anyway
7. Give up on that idea because it sucks.
8. Admit that I write better with a story structure, load the Save The Cat beat sheet
9. Get rid of 90% of the story because it doesn't fit the form
10. Pick the remaining 10% and get to work
11. Suffer
12. ???
13. Success



Points 7,9,11 are about me)))

Re: How do you create your stories?

#100

Crash Wrote: I collect a variety of ideas that appeal to me - character ideas, plot ideas, setting ideas - all little fragments that over time I fit together in strange ways until they reach a critical mass.

For example I'd had the idea "What if an ultra-conservative girl got kidnapped/rescued from her uber-religious family/society by someone completely opposite, perhaps with magical powers the MC's entire culture see as 'evil'?"  (from reading a lot of fundie snark)  And then I combined that with some other ideas I'd had for a magic system and some kinda solar/steam technology ideas I'd had for a setting and then over a couple of years developed a bunch of other ideas and concepts and villain motivations and interactions that could attach to it and fill it out and allow for what I hope is a really interesting journey.

Also I sometimes take inspiration from memes, songs, and meme songs.  And try to hide references in non-obvious ways.  (And not in blantant boring 'nostalgia' lists.  *cough*earnestcline*cough*)

Edit: oh and in turning those ideas into a story and deciding which ones serve it properly I figure out the theme and related imagery and how various concepts and characters explore and exhibit various aspects of that theme.



It turns out that your stories are created as a complex clockwork mechanism consisting of many details. If it's no secret, how long it takes you to write one book?