Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#1
I'm currently writing my novel with the intent of releasing it as a manga someday.

So most of my scenes are visualized like manga panels, which are mostly dialogues. This creates a huge problem for me, because some scenes require a lot of speeches, which makes my work looks more like a screenplay than a novel.

I believe most of the readers will be annoyed by this. Because no matter what, dialogues make it harder to visualize the scenes and the environments.

Any advice for this rookie-level writer?

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#3
I think dialogue is important in stories as it's a good way to develop characters and give readers information without resorting to info dumps. However, too much dialogue can turn off some readers, particularly in genres like LitRPG, fantasy and sci-fi. I'd suggest breaking up the dialogue when possible and using summaries of conversations which aren't critical to the story.

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#6
I think that in many cases it's not the excess of dialogue that makes a poor story, but what that story lacks. Too often a story that's heavy on dialogue is slim on descriptions and character introspection. This makes the characters feel distant to the readers and the setting fuzzy. 

In manga, of course, the visuals do a lot of the legwork. Novels/short stories and manga are fundamentally different mediums and should be respected as such. So I agree with Seerica -- if you are set on writing a novel, write a novel then convert it to a manga later on. But also, why not just go ahead and go for the manga format straight away?

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#7
Dialogue is what allows you to define the relationships your characters have with each other.

Writing that dialogue allows the relationships to grow organically.

A comment about his grandfather being a necromancer here, a mention of her family's tradition of raising golden retrievers there, it all leads to deeper more fully developed characters who have a comfortable dynamic with each other.

It also adds flavor and detail to your story that might not otherwise be there.

You may even find yourself developing characters that you'd only intended to be in the background.

In Monroe, the waitress in the tavern, who had four lines of dialogue, eventually joined the main cast and is in the top five active/seen characters outside of the MC.  She just sort of developed gradually.  She's a great character that I enjoy writing, but if I hadn't given her those lines of dialogue, she would never have grown into herself.

So write the dialogue, show the conversations.  

For my money, it makes for a better story. 

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#8
I can't answer your situation specifically without reading it, but in general it's entirely possible to do what you describe just fine. Every author is different and some manage to use tons of dialogue just fine to tell a story. It's really just a question of whether or not it works. 

What is your take away when you see what you have? If you are unsure about that, get some other opinions and feedbacks on your work. 

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#10
I think in today's day and age, most stories are going to be dialogue driven.  It's not so much a problem of having a lot of dialogues.  It's what's being said that's important, as well as character voice.  You want to be able to tell who is speaking strictly by the way they talk, it adds realism.  And dialogue should always either advance the story or reveal something about the world.  Usually advance the story.

Long flowing descriptions of things don't do too well today, although I like them.  People's attention spans are just shorter.  I would study Tarantino films (a dicey proposition for some, considering the language used in them) if you want to know how effectively dialogue can be used to tell a story.  Especially in Reservoir Dogs.

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#11
I mean, whenever I write I often find myself in situations where either the scene is almost all action or almost all dialogue. When that is the case then, I simply try to weave a bit of the opposite into the works. During an action scene, a few well placed lines combined with epic narration can create an awesome result. During a dialogue scenes, even the subtlest little actions and changes in demeanor can mean everything to the entire flow of the dialogue. They are both important, at all times, though it's fine to have more of one than the other. Just make sure its not any more than 4 or 5 lines of dialogue in a row without any explanation or interaction. (Or at least, that's the rule I use)

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#13
Its not really the amount of dialogue, but the contents of the dialogue itself that can possibly lower the quality of someone's work. For example, if your dialogue is stiff, robotic, uninteresting, or doesn't come across as something those characters would say in that situation, it can drag the work down. If your dialogue is well written, flows well, and makes sense it can make for a much more enjoyable read.

I took a peek at your first chapter, and the first thing I noticed was an excessive use of exclamation marks. In comics/manga, that would be acceptable, but you aren't writing a comic/manga right now. In novels, exclamation marks lose their effectiveness when they're used over and over. They can also change the tone of a story unintentionally if used at the wrong time.

Peeking at your first chapter, considering the situation the characters are in and the current work they're doing, they sound unnaturally chipper thanks to the exclamation marks in my opinion.

That could just be me though, since my personal rule of thumb for exclamation marks is to only use them when a characters is angry, yelling, or excitedly happy over something.

peoconfused

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#14
It depends on your style. Some authors write really lean prose with a lot of dialogue. And take that Harry Potter story Rowling released for the "reading public" which was an actual script of play. If people can read that script and like it, that tells me there's really no such thing as too far this way or too far that way. It all depends on the story and the readers. Some things might get more traction than others, and that's okay.

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#15
you got here a lot of answers, except how to actually write less dialog...


my only tip to give you:
zoom out: you can instead of writing the dialog, you can write what they have talked about instad.
best to use on conversations that are less interesting. it can really pick the pace of story since the reader has a lot less to read.
for example: "they enthusiastically talked about the planes for the trip during lunch"


if you, the author, think that your story has to much of something, that its without a doubt has to much of it.
know your target demographic. some like a lot of descriptions, some like more dialog, some like more inner monologue, and others more like the technical stuff/world building.

without more details on your story and its genre, its hard to give you more focused tips

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#16
One way I keep my scenes from getting so long winded is by breaking it up with action; making a pause to explain them doing an action. Since my writing is in first person, it's usually to walk around (pacing) or by making different facial expressions. 

As for doing it in art form, I imagine you can do much the same. Don't have them just standing static, but actually moving and expressive in some way. If a character is very monotone and flat, then yeah, they probably wouldn't be doing too much, but one that is interactive would be doing something, even if it's just an angle change

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#18

Blank_Thought Wrote: I'm currently writing my novel with the intent of releasing it as a manga someday.

So most of my scenes are visualized like manga panels, which are mostly dialogues. This creates a huge problem for me, because some scenes require a lot of speeches, which makes my work looks more like a screenplay than a novel.

I believe most of the readers will be annoyed by this. Because no matter what, dialogues make it harder to visualize the scenes and the environments.

Any advice for this rookie-level writer?



There's a reason why light novels, manga, and anime all tend to translate well into one another. The reason is fairly nuanced, though, and is unique to each author.

I'd recommend doing some research to explore that reason for yourself.

Something to consider is whether you will be able to translate it into a manga yourself or whether you will need to hire help.

If you will need to hire help, I'd recommend aiming to have it translated into a movie or TV show--assuming you're in the West because that is more common here.

Because your goal is to have it published and be adapted to a movie, you may want to consider writing a screenplay.

EDIT: I forgot to answer the question in the title.

Some great stories are entirely composed of dialogue.

Some great stories contain no dialogue.

Therefore, the amount of dialogue in a story does not determine its worth.

Re: Does having a lot of dialogues drops the quality of your novel?

#19
The important thing to remember with a dialogue heavy story is that in a comic, the speech bubbles do a LOT of heavy lifting. Placement on the page, the tails, the shape of the bubble, font, color, and size choices, these give a LOT of information.  You don't have that.  So you need more than just he said she said back and forth. 

Describe HOW they say things.  Facial expressions, tone of voice. 

I would suggest looking up Curveball by CB Wright.  It's a "text based comic book" in that its a novel in which each chapter is an "issue" and its written very much to feel like a comic book script, but supersized and made good prose. its REALLY good.