Re: Immortal truthes give fiction staying power, which eventually turn to classics--not truths of the day!

#1
There's truth, as it pertains to immortal truths that last through time, and there's the truth of the day, which will eventually expire and make your fiction incredibly dated, and quite possibly unreadable in the future. I don't want to start a debate or ruffle feathers, so I'm not going to get into details. Just remember "the truth" vs "the truth of the day."

That's assuming you even care that your fiction is ever read long after you're gone. I'm not telling anyone how to write or what to put in their writing.

Hope you all had a great Christmas! 

Re: Immortal truthes give fiction staying power, which eventually turn to classics--not truths of the day!

#5

Nautilus Wrote:
Quote:i have no clue what this means. explain?

The way I take is that what they mean by an "immortal truth" would be something like "Good triumphs over evil" or "No one lives forever"

I've no clue what they mean by "truth of the day" unless they mean fads and they just wanted to say it in a poetic way

Yeah. Immortal truths are the ones humans grapple with in every age. 'Truth of the day' is whatever's hot in the current political climate but changes with it. 


Basically the difference between the original Ballad of Mulan and the 2020 live action adaptation. The Ballad of Mulan lasted for 1500 years because it touches on lasting truths. It's about how even a single woman can change the tides of a war, through qualities like loyalty, steadfastness and courage. It's a wonderful story about female empowerment. But the 2020 movie just tried to deliver the empowerment and nothing about the story that made it last, so it's hollow and won't be remembered for anything else but how hilariously bad it was. So it met none of its goals; it didn't deliver a story about courage, and it didn't deliver a story about female empowerment, either. It was courage and loyalty that empowered the character of Mulan in the first place. (Though it did deliver some hilarious reviews on Youtube...) 

Re: Immortal truthes give fiction staying power, which eventually turn to classics--not truths of the day!

#6
Nothing is immortal, especially not stories. Stop and consider how many stories were lost to the sands of time in even as few as 1000 years. When people talk like this it reveals they either have a limited concept of what immortality actually means, or have an overactive imagination regarding how long anything human-created can last. History does not move in a straight uninterrupted line. Hundreds of fits and starts easily prune culture from the historical record. Even the oldest stone architecture is only roughly 10,000 years old. Science tells us that people have been around at least 10 times that long. If our society were to cease today, all that would likely remain in 10,000 years is stone monuments like Mount Rushmore and radioactive waste. If your story is still relevant in 100 years you won the lottery.


Quote:"All those moments will be lost in time, like tears in rain."


Re: Immortal truthes give fiction staying power, which eventually turn to classics--not truths of the day!

#9
Well I actually purposely try to make a lot of sections of my story morally grey where both sides aren't exactly right or wrong. This way, the readers (And even myself sometimes) don't really know who is right or who is wrong, and it's really just up to personal interpretation most of the time. Of course, one side ends up winning in the end- but is that side the good side? Not necessarily.