Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#2
Like any skill, the best way is to build up to it.

You wouldn’t try and run a marathon if you’d never gone for a jog before. If you tried you’d expect to have a rough time of it.

As your brain gets more used to writing you’ll naturally get faster and be able to go for longer periods of time without wearing yourself out. 

Set yourself a comfortable writing goal, something you can easily achieve right now. (I find it best to use time rather than word count.) Over time slowly increase your daily writing time until you’re writing for your desired time/you’ll also find your word count will on average increase. 

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#3

Velara Wrote: Like any skill, the best way is to build up to it.

You wouldn’t try and run a marathon if you’d never gone for a jog before. If you tried you’d expect to have a rough time of it.

As your brain gets more used to writing you’ll naturally get faster and be able to go for longer periods of time without wearing yourself out. 

Set yourself a comfortable writing goal, something you can easily achieve right now. (I find it best to use time rather than word count.) Over time slowly increase your daily writing time until you’re writing for your desired time/you’ll also find your word count will on average increase.






Quote: Thank you for the tip! Word count is better for me because my sense of time is almost nonexistent, specially when i'm focused. Timing things only serves to distract me.
 As for a comfortable goal i'm thinking of writing 600 words/minimum a week, that's a pretty chill pace.
edit: I quoted myself by accident  peoconfused


Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#5
Great advice in this thread so far. For me, there are a couple extra things that help, namely discipline and planning.

Discipline is basically just the ability to make yourself get something done, even if you don't TOTALLY feel like doing it. That might sound like backwards advice for a creative hobby, but it's a surefire way to get yourself into the habit of writing consistently. Something I found to be an excellent tool for this is Patreon. If you're comfortable doing so (and you don't already have one for something else already), try making a Patreon for your writing, even if you don't think your works are good enough, and even if you don't have any patrons for months. Set yourself a schedule and try to stick to it. If you post your works progressively as you write them, make regular update posts for your writing, and if you need to take breaks, make an update post discussing that as well. I've found it's a fantastic tool for keeping yourself accountable. And hey, if you end up getting a couple dedicated fans along the way, the income is another great motivator!

And there's planning! I find that if I don't have the next part of my story planned out, and I'm about to start writing it, I lose all motivation extremely quickly. If you need help figuring out what comes next, whether you're just trying to tie two events together, or you're going full improv, some brainstorming can be a powerful motivator if you're not quite sure what should come next.

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#6
I try not to focus on a daily goal myself.
I set myself a goal of finishing a chapter in a week, I try to stick close to 3000 words a chapter. 
I might write 8k words trying to refine that 3k down to something i like though.

I sometimes write the whole chapter in a single sitting, sometimes it might take a couple. The current one is at around 3,550 words and ive written it over 8 sessions, some were like 10 minutes, others were 3-4 hours. I'm pretty random that way, I find if i sit myself down and force myself to start writing then after a few sentences I can get into the flow of things even if my inspiration is lacking.

Whats important is setting and keeping goals, be forgiving though. If you can't make a goal it's not the end of the world, it just didn't work out that way. Maybe you need to change your goals if you can't consistently hit them.

As for upping the output.
It is important to not edit your writing until you have the ideas down, write first. edit later. If you sit around hmmming and haaahing about where a comma might go or which word to use or worrying about whether such and such a thing makes sense. it will slow you down MASSIVELY.
Throw your internal editor out the window until you can't write anymore, sleep on it, come back and edit it.


Nothing wrong with 600 words in a session either. I frequently might spend an hour on like a 200 word paragraph. as long as you are happy with those 600 words, it is worth it. if it's 600 crap words that just make you want to set your computer on fire and throw it out the window... well then you got a problem. otherwise, its just how you write. and the more you write, the easier it gets.

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#8
Have you tried sprints? I find them useful. They're actually my preferred way to write now. Set a timer for 10 minutes and write like your life depends on it. No pausing to think. No correcting mistakes. Just write. Then take a 5 minute break. Then do it again. Then take a 10 minute break. Then do it again. It's amazing how much you get down in such a short time. Once you have the words down it's much easier to refine them vs. trying to refine them on the fly. 

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#9

Crop Wrote: Thank you Fernicus, Krahie and seerica your adivce helps me a lot! Fernicus was specially helpful. I'm sure I will be able to write more smoothly from now on! Even if it's not a huge leap, every bit helps.



Eh, no problems mate :D

I am a newbie at writing myself, got like... C's in english back in high school all those years ago. I learned what I know from people like Stephen King and a few other authors who have video's on how to write on youtube.
So that is a really good place to hunt down advice about these kind of things.

There are many different styles of writing and everyone develops a style which works for them as they progress.
I learned how to outline my ideas when I learned how to write scripts and do storyboards for animation, I take my improvisational skills from my years of playing dungeons and dragons and I pick and mix everything else from other authors who have shared their knowledge on youtube and other sources.

learning improv is massively helpful if you need to get yourself out of a jam and into that flow of writing.


Of course there are plenty of people on the opposite spectrum of things too, people who full on plan everything out in minute detail before they connect it all together with words.  The people who do this can spend months developing a story before they even write the first word, and when they do Bam!, it all slots together like magic. I can't do it and I respect the ones who can :P

Find what works :D

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#11
Every writer is different. Not every project will work the same way, either. Keep that in mind when you read any writer’s advice:  it’s all personal and you may need to try different things until it clicks. Don’t let others make you feel bad for not doing things their way.

That said, here is my way.

I recommend looking for planning techniques that work for you. That way when you sit down to write, you can spend more time actually writing than thinking about what to write. I normally consider myself a discovery writer, rather than a planner, but there are planning methods even discovery writers may use if they want to write more in a session. Planning is especially important if you are setting deadlines for yourself.

On an average night, without a plan, I average about 1,500 words. I have managed nights of 9k before, but it was really rough stuff and burned me out for days after. When I plan, I average about 3k a night and have topped 12k with little or no burnout and less editing necessary later. Last Nanowrimo was the first time I did a proper outline and also the first time I completed the 50k goal. I started on the third day and “finished” with a total of 55k words a week early. (I have written for most of my life at this point, so don’t take my averages as an intimidating goal when you first start out. I would have been lucky to average 600 words my first several years and, indeed, even now when I am sick or stressed.) 

Also, I highly recommend the pomodoro technique (like the sprints mentioned already). The five and ten minute breaks built into the system help more than you might think. I try to get up and walk around, stretch, and think over the next segment or connecting dots not covered in my outline. Then when I go back to writing, I’ve already probably solved what might have made me stumble otherwise.

When it’s time to write, write. Don’t wait for the muse to bless you. Learn to write without her fickle self and she’ll hang out more often. There will be days where you are legit too sick or stressed or burned out to write. But try anyway because the more excuses you have to put it off, the harder it is to find the groove.

Last suggestion for now... Don’t write something you’re not interested in. You’ll naturally write more if you love what you write about and want to know what happens next too. If you don’t have a passion for it, you aren’t likely to enjoy the experience and eventually, your readers will probably pick up on it too. I have had many writer friends who killed their love of writing because they were too caught up in wanting to be Serious Writers when their true passion was fluffy romance, or who got angry when their Trendy Genre fics didn’t sell when “those idiots read trash, so of course they don’t like mine because its actually good”. If you want to write about something as niche as the inner lives of potted plants or as popular as dungeon core on RR, don’t listen to anyone who says you shouldn’t. It’s okay to write something tropey if you want to. Maybe only seven people on RR have any interest in reading a romance about a superstar falling in love with a fan, but those seven people will be stoked. Or don’t share it on RR at all if you don’t want to. It’s ok to write just for yourself if you’re too shy to share. 

Enjoy yourself.

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#13
Lots of great advice already. For me the hardest part is just getting started. Once I'm actually writing it goes pretty smoothly. I'll sit at the computer and suddenly remember something I have to do or get distracted by the infernal internet. I think two things cause me to do this; setting overly optimistic expectations that I'm afraid of not meeting and not having a clear idea exactly what I want to write. Still working on both of these and I found the advice above quite helpful.

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#14
There is some good advice here, but the most important thing is to develop enough perspective (and eventually experience) on how to try writing to ultimately learn what works for you and how to apply it. Implementing a strategy is often as important as formulating it and executing it. In strategy this is the part between knowing what you want to do and doing it, the vague transition between thought and action.

For my bit of advice I’d suggest training yourself to be adaptable to your writing, as well as in the writing itself if you can. The biggest general issue you’ll find in a habit like this is when it or you become maladaptive in some way.

You lose interest in your story, and you can’t adapt to write something you ARE interested in or reignite that interest. You can’t adapt your writing time to your schedule. The pace or quality of the story changes in some way after achieving an important or the like plot point and you can’t adapt to the new form of narrative you need to transition to, or figure out where the story goes from there. Etc.

I’d say regularly trying out writing prompts and experimenting can be helpful if you can switch between them and more goal oriented writing. They might teach you how to start writing a story quickly right after you get an idea for them, and conform your style to what is appropriate in any given circumstance. A prompt is something that can get you to start writing, and the arbitrariness of the prompt with the expectation that you must figure out how to adapt a good story out of anything, even make it fit into some more restrictive existing narrative by some convoluted logic and tie things together sometimes.

The other thing I can personally suggest is a sort of warm up for your writing. Infound while writing Ars Alogia the structure I baked into every “Entry” helped me push out words even when I ran low on fumes. I had to write the in-universe date to every entry, I started off most entries talking about a specific thing every time and what changed about it or happened to it this time, there was a lot of stuff that I could easily revisit and it would be appropriate to how I made the story, and there were events specifically intended to be spaced out across several entries chronologically, so I could decide to progress those or not in any given entry even using them as an excuse to mindlessly just push out an update without too much creative thought necessary. There was a familiarity to the structure that helped me get into the writing, and I could do 1000 words often enough, though I discuss really try going for word counts while writing as much as I could have.

That said, a danger I found was conforming too much to a structured schedule even when I didn’t feel like it. It’s important to be able to do so but it becomes maladaptive if you have to keep doing it beyond getting started. That is why I suggest writing prompts, try to add a casualness to the practice of your writing. Do stuff because you haven’t tried them before, write because you want to, try something reckless for no other reason than you can. External motivations such as a schedule are good motivators, but extrinsic motivations also tend to obscure intrinsic ones. You can have both, but it is easy to lose sight of your intrinsic motivations if you aren’t mindful of them, so do whatever works for you to remind yourself what you love about writing or stories or even just characters and specific genres. If you think of something weird to try out, remember you don’t ever need an excuse to do whatever you want to, for no reason at all.

Now go out there and torment some protagonist you magnificent bastard.

Re: How do you write more on a daily basis?

#15
I find that I've had to simply build up to it over time with defined concrete goals for output.

It helps to break down your own pretensions about the quality of your writing and you stop being intimidated by the prospect of having to live up to an impossible standard you set for yourself.

I find I can pretty reliably write 1,000-2,000 words a day and I can range up to 4,000 on a quiet weekend day now. I used to be much more in the 400 to 800 words a day range, but I slowly worked my way up by setting firm and realistic targets. The key is making them realistic.

I also recommend silly writing exercises using random prompts to help knock the dust out of your brain. I've experimented with writing a pretty wide range of stuff and I find that's helpful for keeping your mind limber.