Re: Grammar/Spelling Check

#1
Hey, so I am new here (Hello everyone!) and have recently started to post some of my work here and work on it here, but I was wondering if anyone would mind helping me.  Although I do try to proof read and correct mistakes myself, in the end I am still human and therefore imperfect, so I was wondering if someone would read some of my fictions and give me advice and point out mistakes for me?  Also maybe some reviews, though since its early if you feel like waiting to do it later that is understandable.

For ease of finding things, here are the links to them:

The Reincarnated Boy's Tears:

https://www.royalroad.com/fiction/29749/the-reincarnated-boys-tears

Aurion: The New World:

https://www.royalroad.com/fiction/29748/aurion-the-new-world

Re: Grammar/Spelling Check

#4

Azaken Wrote:
Gennon Wrote: Try grammarly, prowriting aid, then get a text-to-speech to read your work back to you. Do all of that, and you will have a highly polished chapter every time.

Alright, though what is Grammarly, Prowriting Aid?  Is it a program?  A website?

https://app.grammarly.com/
https://prowritingaid.com/

They're both web editors and I think one of them has a desktop version. Both have free and paid versions, but the free versions are good enough.


Re: Grammar/Spelling Check

#7
Reading the work out loud, and checking with a grammar engine / style engine like Hemingway will help with flow and cadence. What you want though, is critique, and outside of occasional notations from comment left in your workspace most will only engage in the practice on a critique swap basis that you may not be ready to engage in. You can  "bone up" on this on sites like Critters.org and in other writing circles that exist to provide this. Spell checking engines should be used, but do not correct mistaken word choice errors where similar words may be correctly spelled but used in the way wrong context, and Grammar correction softwares are more focused on business communications than on prose use, though occasionally helpful. 

Re: Grammar/Spelling Check

#8

FAHyatt Wrote: Reading the work out loud, and checking with a grammar engine / style engine like Hemingway will help with flow and cadence. What you want though, is critique, and outside of occasional notations from comment left in your workspace most will only engage in the practice on a critique swap basis that you may not be ready to engage in. You can  "bone up" on this on sites like Critters.org and in other writing circles that exist to provide this. Spell checking engines should be used, but do not correct mistaken word choice errors where similar words may be correctly spelled but used in the way wrong context, and Grammar correction softwares are more focused on business communications than on prose use, though occasionally helpful.



What all the above people have said. Here's what I do:

1. Write in something with a grammar check. I currently use Google Docs, but you could use Word, LibreOffice, whatever. (Using Grammarly inside webpages has been mostly hit or miss, so I would advise against that.) Make sure you use either US English or UK English, or whatever consistent format...

2. Make sure your work is readable (formatting, line breaks, dialogue tags, all that boring stuff).

(Check here, I'm too lazy to retype this every time :-) https://ninelizardsblog.blogspot.com/2020/10/the-readers-first-impression-or-what.html )

3. Revise each chapter, using both Grammarly and a TTS tool (text to speech) before posting them.

(I sometimes post before having done a TTS check, and mark those chapters as DRAFT. I sill need to revise some parts of my work, sigh.)


Indeed, another pair of eyes is the best, however nobody is going to offer you a free ride, because most people want to work on their own stories, instead of reviewing other people's work. Still, I do believe in Critique Swaps, they have helped me a lot. So, give detailed comments on someone else's chapter in exchange for detailed comments on yours.

Re: Grammar/Spelling Check

#9

Nine Wrote:
FAHyatt Wrote: Reading the work out loud, and checking with a grammar engine / style engine like Hemingway will help with flow and cadence. What you want though, is critique, and outside of occasional notations from comment left in your workspace most will only engage in the practice on a critique swap basis that you may not be ready to engage in. You can  "bone up" on this on sites like Critters.org and in other writing circles that exist to provide this. Spell checking engines should be used, but do not correct mistaken word choice errors where similar words may be correctly spelled but used in the way wrong context, and Grammar correction softwares are more focused on business communications than on prose use, though occasionally helpful.



What all the above people have said. Here's what I do:

1. Write in something with a grammar check. I currently use Google Docs, but you could use Word, LibreOffice, whatever. (Using Grammarly inside webpages has been mostly hit or miss, so I would advise against that.) Make sure you use either US English or UK English, or whatever consistent format...

2. Make sure your work is readable (formatting, line breaks, dialogue tags, all that boring stuff).

(Check here, I'm too lazy to retype this every time :-) https://ninelizardsblog.blogspot.com/2020/10/the-readers-first-impression-or-what.html )

3. Revise each chapter, using both Grammarly and a TTS tool (text to speech) before posting them.

(I sometimes post before having done a TTS check, and mark those chapters as DRAFT. I sill need to revise some parts of my work, sigh.)

If we are talking about writing, art and word as the main component of every author, I believe that there should be no restrictions in literature. Everything is allowed, absolutely everything, and this is the thrill when you expand your Overton Window, thereby improving your reader. There should be absolute freedom of speech, read some essays about this at https://eduzaurus.com/free-essay-samples/freedom-of-speech/ A very important component of today's reality is to be free.

Indeed, another pair of eyes is the best, however nobody is going to offer you a free ride, because most people want to work on their own stories, instead of reviewing other people's work. Still, I do believe in Critique Swaps, they have helped me a lot. So, give detailed comments on someone else's chapter in exchange for detailed comments on yours.

thank you very much for the recommendations, it's very helpful for me!


Re: Grammar/Spelling Check

#10
From my experience, Grammarly just corrects some of your spelling and grammar mistakes, it will not correct all of your mistakes, you need to be very attentive. Sometimes is better to ask a human to proofread your work than to use some online services. My kids always ask for help from an essay revisor because they also tell them their mistakes and they can discuss them, so they can know where to pay attention next time when they are writing an essay.