Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#2
Post consistently
Post regularly (less important than being reliable in the long term and communicating when you go hiatus)
Reply to your commenters
Give +Rep to your commenters
Actually use the Author’s Notes at the beginning and end of chapters to make people more aware not only of the book,  ut of you as an author.
Engage your community in general, wherever or however it works best. As long as it’s in a way you can deal with (like don’t read every comment if there are thousands, or if you just can’t deal with reading too much feedback or whatever)
Engage the writer community as well. Post on the forums, give +Rep, join the discord, start discussions. Be part of the community. It won’t exactly draw in readers like advertising or anything, but it’s generally healthy. Plus a lot of the advanced reviews are easier to get if you draw the attention of the reviewers by them knowing you exist.
Don’t be unapproachable. You can go for the mysterious anonymous author thing, but don’t discourage people giving you feedback or engaging with you or whatever community your book has. This has a lot to do with the author notes, since people can sort of tell (slightly, not always, but their perception of you is more important than the reality here) if giving you criticism constructive or not will result in you actually listening or maybe even reacting in a toxic way. Be open to views that contradict yours or perspectives that sees more of your faults than your virtues.
Also, be confident, especially in how you present yourself. If there’s a stumble you should own it and laugh it off. If you’ve got the good humour enough to shrug off the bad stuff and move on, that would be a lot more admirable than the person who gracelessly tried to retcon their mistakes away or shout away anyone who points out their flaws. The show must go on, so play that stumble off as part of the act even, like something you don’t mind at all. You don’t have to be perfect, just energetic. 

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#3
Wrote: Post consistently
Post regularly (less important than being reliable in the long term and communicating when you go hiatus)
Reply to your commenters
Give +Rep to your commenters
Actually use the Author’s Notes at the beginning and end of chapters to make people more aware not only of the book,  ut of you as an author.
Engage your community in general, wherever or however it works best. As long as it’s in a way you can deal with (like don’t read every comment if there are thousands, or if you just can’t deal with reading too much feedback or whatever)
Engage the writer community as well. Post on the forums, give +Rep, join the discord, start discussions. Be part of the community. It won’t exactly draw in readers like advertising or anything, but it’s generally healthy. Plus a lot of the advanced reviews are easier to get if you draw the attention of the reviewers by them knowing you exist.
Don’t be unapproachable. You can go for the mysterious anonymous author thing, but don’t discourage people giving you feedback or engaging with you or whatever community your book has. This has a lot to do with the author notes, since people can sort of tell (slightly, not always, but their perception of you is more important than the reality here) if giving you criticism constructive or not will result in you actually listening or maybe even reacting in a toxic way. Be open to views that contradict yours or perspectives that sees more of your faults than your virtues.
Also, be confident, especially in how you present yourself. If there’s a stumble you should own it and laugh it off. If you’ve got the good humour enough to shrug off the bad stuff and move on, that would be a lot more admirable than the person who gracelessly tried to retcon their mistakes away or shout away anyone who points out their flaws. The show must go on, so play that stumble off as part of the act even, like something you don’t mind at all. You don’t have to be perfect, just energetic.

Thanks for the piece of advice, it helps.

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#4
I think Endless Paving got the exposure aspect down pat I think so I think I will cover some of the ways to get better grammar and punctuation.

1) If you're like me, then you've probably forgotten most of the rules for writing in the english language. It's either that or your school felt it was far more important to read decades old books instead of teaching you how to write properly. In either case, have a look through the rules for english grammar (assuming that english is the primary language you're writing in.) Knowing the ruleset for writing sentences and paragraphs is something that will make or break your writing. Cheat sheets are a good idea, as is free/paid writing software.

2) Spelling: Most computer programs that people use to write things in, come with spell checking so I don't think that there's anything that needs to be said about this except that it's always safe to double check. I've noticed that Microsoft Word sometimes prefers to use the British way of spelling things (such as Axe vs. Ax) Writing programs such as Grammarly tend to use the British spelling for most words, but I doubt most people will mind it.

3) Increase your vocabulary. You'll find out pretty quickly about how limited ones grammar can be when you sit down and write pages upon pages of your own story. Using Thesauraus.com helps out with this and there are writing programs that can offer up synonyms for words that they detect being overused. Being aware of the actual definition for more obscure words will help with this too, so be sure that the word you wish to use actually means what you think it means.

4) Break up your sentences. Having Periods, commas, semicolons, and so forth helps out a lot and stops your paragraphs from feeling like they're zooming on by. It also gives the reader a chance to breath.

5) Don't try to write how your favorite author(s) write. More than likely that won't be how you'll want to write and any attempt at copying someone's writing style will only handicap your own potential. Instead you should take inspiration from how they write specific scenes, such as action oriented scenes or character introductions. (I.E. Look at how they're describing the movements of those fighting one another or how an author describes a new character. What does the MC see, hear, and feel from his POV)

6) Acronyms: Should only be used after you tell the reader what they stand for. It doesn't matter how common they are in life, always spell them out before you use an acronym for the first time. It's always better to be safe and have the reader understand what you're saying from the get go, then sorry and have the reader become lost if they're unaware of what the acronym stands for.

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#5
Jornug Wrote: I think Endless Paving got the exposure aspect down pat I think so I think I will cover some of the ways to get better grammar and punctuation.

1) If you're like me, then you've probably forgotten most of the rules for writing in the english language. It's either that or your school felt it was far more important to read decades old books instead of teaching you how to write properly. In either case, have a look through the rules for english grammar (assuming that english is the primary language you're writing in.) Knowing the ruleset for writing sentences and paragraphs is something that will make or break your writing. Cheat sheets are a good idea, as is free/paid writing software.

2) Spelling: Most computer programs that people use to write things in, come with spell checking so I don't think that there's anything that needs to be said about this except that it's always safe to double check. I've noticed that Microsoft Word sometimes prefers to use the British way of spelling things (such as Axe vs. Ax) Writing programs such as Grammarly tend to use the British spelling for most words, but I doubt most people will mind it.

3) Increase your vocabulary. You'll find out pretty quickly about how limited ones grammar can be when you sit down and write pages upon pages of your own story. Using Thesauraus.com helps out with this and there are writing programs that can offer up synonyms for words that they detect being overused. Being aware of the actual definition for more obscure words will help with this too, so be sure that the word you wish to use actually means what you think it means.

4) Break up your sentences. Having Periods, commas, semicolons, and so forth helps out a lot and stops your paragraphs from feeling like they're zooming on by. It also gives the reader a chance to breath.

5) Don't try to write how your favorite author(s) write. More than likely that won't be how you'll want to write and any attempt at copying someone's writing style will only handicap your own potential. Instead you should take inspiration from how they write specific scenes, such as action oriented scenes or character introductions. (I.E. Look at how they're describing the movements of those fighting one another or how an author describes a new character. What does the MC see, hear, and feel from his POV)

6) Acronyms: Should only be used after you tell the reader what they stand for. It doesn't matter how common they are in life, always spell them out before you use an acronym for the first time. It's always better to be safe and have the reader understand what you're saying from the get go, then sorry and have the reader become lost if they're unaware of what the acronym stands for.

Thanks for the tips