Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#2
Post consistently
Post regularly (less important than being reliable in the long term and communicating when you go hiatus)
Reply to your commenters
Give +Rep to your commenters
Actually use the Author’s Notes at the beginning and end of chapters to make people more aware not only of the book,  ut of you as an author.
Engage your community in general, wherever or however it works best. As long as it’s in a way you can deal with (like don’t read every comment if there are thousands, or if you just can’t deal with reading too much feedback or whatever)
Engage the writer community as well. Post on the forums, give +Rep, join the discord, start discussions. Be part of the community. It won’t exactly draw in readers like advertising or anything, but it’s generally healthy. Plus a lot of the advanced reviews are easier to get if you draw the attention of the reviewers by them knowing you exist.
Don’t be unapproachable. You can go for the mysterious anonymous author thing, but don’t discourage people giving you feedback or engaging with you or whatever community your book has. This has a lot to do with the author notes, since people can sort of tell (slightly, not always, but their perception of you is more important than the reality here) if giving you criticism constructive or not will result in you actually listening or maybe even reacting in a toxic way. Be open to views that contradict yours or perspectives that sees more of your faults than your virtues.
Also, be confident, especially in how you present yourself. If there’s a stumble you should own it and laugh it off. If you’ve got the good humour enough to shrug off the bad stuff and move on, that would be a lot more admirable than the person who gracelessly tried to retcon their mistakes away or shout away anyone who points out their flaws. The show must go on, so play that stumble off as part of the act even, like something you don’t mind at all. You don’t have to be perfect, just energetic. 

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#3
Endless Paving Wrote: Post consistently
Post regularly (less important than being reliable in the long term and communicating when you go hiatus)
Reply to your commenters
Give +Rep to your commenters
Actually use the Author’s Notes at the beginning and end of chapters to make people more aware not only of the book,  ut of you as an author.
Engage your community in general, wherever or however it works best. As long as it’s in a way you can deal with (like don’t read every comment if there are thousands, or if you just can’t deal with reading too much feedback or whatever)
Engage the writer community as well. Post on the forums, give +Rep, join the discord, start discussions. Be part of the community. It won’t exactly draw in readers like advertising or anything, but it’s generally healthy. Plus a lot of the advanced reviews are easier to get if you draw the attention of the reviewers by them knowing you exist.
Don’t be unapproachable. You can go for the mysterious anonymous author thing, but don’t discourage people giving you feedback or engaging with you or whatever community your book has. This has a lot to do with the author notes, since people can sort of tell (slightly, not always, but their perception of you is more important than the reality here) if giving you criticism constructive or not will result in you actually listening or maybe even reacting in a toxic way. Be open to views that contradict yours or perspectives that sees more of your faults than your virtues.
Also, be confident, especially in how you present yourself. If there’s a stumble you should own it and laugh it off. If you’ve got the good humour enough to shrug off the bad stuff and move on, that would be a lot more admirable than the person who gracelessly tried to retcon their mistakes away or shout away anyone who points out their flaws. The show must go on, so play that stumble off as part of the act even, like something you don’t mind at all. You don’t have to be perfect, just energetic.

Thanks for the piece of advice, it helps.

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#4
I think Endless Paving got the exposure aspect down pat I think so I think I will cover some of the ways to get better grammar and punctuation.

1) If you're like me, then you've probably forgotten most of the rules for writing in the english language. It's either that or your school felt it was far more important to read decades old books instead of teaching you how to write properly. In either case, have a look through the rules for english grammar (assuming that english is the primary language you're writing in.) Knowing the ruleset for writing sentences and paragraphs is something that will make or break your writing. Cheat sheets are a good idea, as is free/paid writing software.

2) Spelling: Most computer programs that people use to write things in, come with spell checking so I don't think that there's anything that needs to be said about this except that it's always safe to double check. I've noticed that Microsoft Word sometimes prefers to use the British way of spelling things (such as Axe vs. Ax) Writing programs such as Grammarly tend to use the British spelling for most words, but I doubt most people will mind it.

3) Increase your vocabulary. You'll find out pretty quickly about how limited ones grammar can be when you sit down and write pages upon pages of your own story. Using Thesauraus.com helps out with this and there are writing programs that can offer up synonyms for words that they detect being overused. Being aware of the actual definition for more obscure words will help with this too, so be sure that the word you wish to use actually means what you think it means.

4) Break up your sentences. Having Periods, commas, semicolons, and so forth helps out a lot and stops your paragraphs from feeling like they're zooming on by. It also gives the reader a chance to breath.

5) Don't try to write how your favorite author(s) write. More than likely that won't be how you'll want to write and any attempt at copying someone's writing style will only handicap your own potential. Instead you should take inspiration from how they write specific scenes, such as action oriented scenes or character introductions. (I.E. Look at how they're describing the movements of those fighting one another or how an author describes a new character. What does the MC see, hear, and feel from his POV)

6) Acronyms: Should only be used after you tell the reader what they stand for. It doesn't matter how common they are in life, always spell them out before you use an acronym for the first time. It's always better to be safe and have the reader understand what you're saying from the get go, then sorry and have the reader become lost if they're unaware of what the acronym stands for.

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#5
Jornug Wrote: I think Endless Paving got the exposure aspect down pat I think so I think I will cover some of the ways to get better grammar and punctuation.

1) If you're like me, then you've probably forgotten most of the rules for writing in the english language. It's either that or your school felt it was far more important to read decades old books instead of teaching you how to write properly. In either case, have a look through the rules for english grammar (assuming that english is the primary language you're writing in.) Knowing the ruleset for writing sentences and paragraphs is something that will make or break your writing. Cheat sheets are a good idea, as is free/paid writing software.

2) Spelling: Most computer programs that people use to write things in, come with spell checking so I don't think that there's anything that needs to be said about this except that it's always safe to double check. I've noticed that Microsoft Word sometimes prefers to use the British way of spelling things (such as Axe vs. Ax) Writing programs such as Grammarly tend to use the British spelling for most words, but I doubt most people will mind it.

3) Increase your vocabulary. You'll find out pretty quickly about how limited ones grammar can be when you sit down and write pages upon pages of your own story. Using Thesauraus.com helps out with this and there are writing programs that can offer up synonyms for words that they detect being overused. Being aware of the actual definition for more obscure words will help with this too, so be sure that the word you wish to use actually means what you think it means.

4) Break up your sentences. Having Periods, commas, semicolons, and so forth helps out a lot and stops your paragraphs from feeling like they're zooming on by. It also gives the reader a chance to breath.

5) Don't try to write how your favorite author(s) write. More than likely that won't be how you'll want to write and any attempt at copying someone's writing style will only handicap your own potential. Instead you should take inspiration from how they write specific scenes, such as action oriented scenes or character introductions. (I.E. Look at how they're describing the movements of those fighting one another or how an author describes a new character. What does the MC see, hear, and feel from his POV)

6) Acronyms: Should only be used after you tell the reader what they stand for. It doesn't matter how common they are in life, always spell them out before you use an acronym for the first time. It's always better to be safe and have the reader understand what you're saying from the get go, then sorry and have the reader become lost if they're unaware of what the acronym stands for.

Thanks for the tips

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#6
I think the best way for to help with grammar and sentence structure is two things. Read A LOT. I have been an avid reader for 15 years now, probably averaging 3 hours a day of reading. 15 x 365 x 3 = 16,425 hours but i would probably add another 1,000 hours or so to that. Reading that much has lent me a familiarity towards writing that i instinctively have a decent ability in writing despite my bad grades in High School English class and my lack of research.

Second and most probably more important helpful tip is rereading what you have wrote, preferably out load. Write your chapters, make sure you aren't posting them immediately after you are finished. But give yourself like a week of caught up chapters. One week later before you post your chapter, reread it out loud to look for bad grammar or bad sentence structures, then fix them. Giving yourself a break from the chapter will give you fresh eyes. 

Re: New Author here inviting anyone to share tips on how to grow on Royal Road.

#7
Hi Rxlr - I second everything that Endless Paving, Jornug, and Silvanatri said.

Regarding your writing: 

In addition to frequent references to a thesaurus, it can also help to search for period-specific phrases, or alternative cultural sayings, depending on the setting of your story.  You want to ensure that the vocabulary you're using is not only accurate, but fits the time-period or culture your characters are in.  Saying "Dude, that's awesome, sick back-flip, bro!" doesn't fit in Victorian England, nor would feel immersive to read in a story set in Feudal Japan.

If you have the time, finding a text-to-speech online reader can help you find a lot of errors in your writing that you may not catch as your eyes begin to cross from seeing it in front of you day in and day out.  It can also assist you in finding alternative ways to phrase awkward sentences and otherwise provide added perspective on what you hoped to accomplish in a given scene.

Regarding Engagement:

Why do you write?  How you engage can largely be determined by what kind of author you are striving to be.  If you're looking to share stories you think are cool, then your own opinion matters more than the general public. If you want to become a published author with a growing community of loyal readers, engagement is important for different reasons.

As you progress with sharing stories publicly, you'll run through a gamut of comments. I think it's valuable to pull yourself back from your emotional attachment to your writing, and take the comments in the spirit with which they're written.  The internet has a long history of toxicity that has ingrained itself so deeply into its culture that some people are negative without truly being aware of it.  As far as I'm concerned, the fact that someone commented at all is great news! They took the time to read what you wrote, and then took the time to write a comment about it.

As you engage with commenters of every kind, it can be beneficial to be cognizant of that.  Everybody expresses their opinions. It's great when those opinions are constructive criticisms that help you grow as an author, and wonderful to interact with those folks. Engaging poorly to negative commentary however, can take you down a rabbit hole that could be detrimental to your overall appearance as an author. Ultimately its up to each of us to determine how we engage.

Exposure:

The hours following the post of a new chapter have, for me, been the most noticeable for exposure due to the fact that it'll appear for a short time on the main page.  As such, it can be worthwhile to write enough ahead of time that you can schedule releases to periodically put you back in front of everyone's eyes.