Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#1
Hey, I was wondering if I could get some quick help with one of my main characters motivation real quick? I have most of it figured out, I just need to know if it's strong enough or if it can carry through the whole story. Or at least one arc. 

My main protagonist is a cat humanoid bounty hunter who travels around her country killing bad guys for money, cracking jokes, and coming home to her lover. She feels like she has everything she has; a fun job, a home, and somebody to fall in love with. In the first few chapters though, she comes across this one bounty for a young girl. She is hesitant at first because she doesn't like the idea of hunting down minors. But after one of her hunts, she meets the young girl hunting her instead. She easily defeats her and decides to bring her in alive, mainly because she needs the money and that the kid attacked first. But then the bounty hunter discovers that some bad people working for the antagonist are after the girl for some shady reasons. 

To make things worse, the bounty hunter also runs into an enemy of hers from the past, who now works as a soldier/royal guard, who believes that the bounty hunter is kidnapping the girl. So the bounty hunter decides to take in the girl until she figures out what to do with her. This also paints a bigger target on her back as she is being attacked by both the villains and the authorities. Now the bounty hunter has to figure who the bad guys are, figure out there plan, and stop them while also protecting the girl. 

Thoughts? 

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#2
Just from a quick glance and without knowing the story, it's hard to say. If I understood you correctly, her actions are hinging on this premise: The main antagonist is somehow involved. From that point of view, it makes sense that she wants to stop them (given it was handed enough room in the story to breathe). That makes sense but I'm doubtful when it comes to also protecting the girl. 

Why would she do that? The little girl has previously attacked her. That makes her an enemy. Why would she suddenly go out of her way to protect her in a situation where she is already deep in the proverbial mud. That aspects needs an additional motivator, maybe the girl has some intel and they form an uneasy alliance or there was a situation where the girl showed that she no longer means harm and can be trusted, that can work too. Right now, it seems like the girl would be the equivalent of stuffing a poisonous snake into your pocket while hoping it won't bite. 

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#3
Felias Wrote: Just from a quick glance and without knowing the story, it's hard to say. If I understood you correctly, her actions are hinging on this premise: The main antagonist is somehow involved. From that point of view, it makes sense that she wants to stop them (given it was handed enough room in the story to breathe). That makes sense but I'm doubtful when it comes to also protecting the girl. 

Why would she do that? The little girl has previously attacked her. That makes her an enemy. Why would she suddenly go out of her way to protect her in a situation where she is already deep in the proverbial mud. That aspects needs an additional motivator, maybe the girl has some intel and they form an uneasy alliance or there was a situation where the girl showed that she no longer means harm and can be trusted, that can work too. Right now, it seems like the girl would be the equivalent of stuffing a poisonous snake into your pocket while hoping it won't bite.


Well, the girl has a hidden magic ability that the bad guys want to exploit for their own reasons. In fact, they destroyed her whole town just to try and get to her. But she escaped and is merely trying to survive. When the bounty hunter notices what the girl can do, she knows she can't let that ability get into enemy hands, because then it could result in a huge disaster. The girl didn't want to attack the bounty hunter but she just needed some money to get by in life. That's one idea I had for her. 

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#4
My answer would really depend on whether you're aiming to write a short story or a more developed story and whether you're a starting write or if you already have some experience.

In case you only want to make it a simple short story and you don't have much experience writing, feel free to focus on your MC's emotions and feelings as the main drive to saving that girl. No logic, no reasoning, just pure feelings. Let's say the girl attacks MC, MC wins easily, but as she approaches that girl to finish her off, she sees her break down in tears and thinks; what? Why is an asassin acting in this way? Because of that she grows curious. You can even add something cliche like, the girl resembles MC's dead little sister or something like that. The plot twist can be that the girl is really MC's niece and her real little sister isn't dead as she had been assuming from her childhood.

Heh, I got ahead of myself again :P I love such little stories, but if you aren't at least somewhat experienced as a writer, then keep it simple and straightforward. Don't pretend in narration that MC is acting by logic and reason and make her act on pure emotions and feelings alone. That's far simpler because you don't need to worry that much about keeping the decisionmaking ability at a certain level and instead can direct most of MC's actions by what she's experiencing and going through at the moment.

If you are more exprienced, though, you can tweak more with the plotline. Add some mysteries that will be revealed later, add some things that MC can't figure out immediately. Don't info-dump, it's fine to reveal the world and the story little by little, especially when it's on the larger end as far as scale goes.

I could say some more things, but I don't want to rant. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#5
Caladbolg Wrote: My answer would really depend on whether you're aiming to write a short story or a more developed story and whether you're a starting write or if you already have some experience.

In case you only want to make it a simple short story and you don't have much experience writing, feel free to focus on your MC's emotions and feelings as the main drive to saving that girl. No logic, no reasoning, just pure feelings. Let's say the girl attacks MC, MC wins easily, but as she approaches that girl to finish her off, she sees her break down in tears and thinks; what? Why is an asassin acting in this way? Because of that she grows curious. You can even add something cliche like, the girl resembles MC's dead little sister or something like that. The plot twist can be that the girl is really MC's niece and her real little sister isn't dead as she had been assuming from her childhood.

Heh, I got ahead of myself again :P I love such little stories, but if you aren't at least somewhat experienced as a writer, then keep it simple and straightforward. Don't pretend in narration that MC is acting by logic and reason and make her act on pure emotions and feelings alone. That's far simpler because you don't need to worry that much about keeping the decisionmaking ability at a certain level and instead can direct most of MC's actions by what she's experiencing and going through at the moment.

If you are more exprienced, though, you can tweak more with the plotline. Add some mysteries that will be revealed later, add some things that MC can't figure out immediately. Don't info-dump, it's fine to reveal the world and the story little by little, especially when it's on the larger end as far as scale goes.

I could say some more things, but I don't want to rant. If you have any questions, feel free to ask.


Well, I do have one other question regarding motivations of one of the characters. 

I mentioned before that the main character has had enemies come in and cause trouble for her. I was thinking one of her rivals could be this soldier from the capital of the county that has it out for her. He doesn't like her because of her bounty hunter lifestyle, she kills people for money and acts like it's no big deal. This goes against everything the soldier stands for and feels like she must be stopped. Like when I introduce him, he sees her killing and catching one of her latest bounties. He tries to bring her in, but she escapes and delivers her bounty anyway. And throughout the story, the soldier tries to catch and turn in the MC while the MC is just trying to survive and live her life. Do you think that's good enough motivation for the soldier character?

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#6
Motivation is fine, but you need to flesh it out more. Is being a bounty hunter against the law or did the soldier act out of his own jursdiction? Why is it exactly your MC that warrants the soldier's ire instead of other bounty hunters? What exactly made the soldier hate bounty hunters, did he perhaps have some bad experience with them in the past? Just off the top of my head, did one of his friends get wrongly killed by a famous bounty hunter who mistook him for the target and the entire thing was swept under the rug because of the royal influence? Is there an opportunity for your MC's worldview and/or the soldeir's worldview to evolve and change through their conflict? If it's going to be more than plot for 1-2 chapters, then things like that are what you should consider early on in order to make it interesting and to make characters more human.

For me, simply stating that conflict emerged from 'conflicting views' is pretty bland and not something I would do in my own story, especially if it's supposed to be a bigger plot point and not an event that ends in 10 paragraphs.

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#7
Caladbolg Wrote: Motivation is fine, but you need to flesh it out more. Is being a bounty hunter against the law or did the soldier act out of his own jursdiction? Why is it exactly your MC that warrants the soldier's ire instead of other bounty hunters? What exactly made the soldier hate bounty hunters, did he perhaps have some bad experience with them in the past? Just off the top of my head, did one of his friends get wrongly killed by a famous bounty hunter who mistook him for the target and the entire thing was swept under the rug because of the royal influence? Is there an opportunity for your MC's worldview and/or the soldeir's worldview to evolve and change through their conflict? If it's going to be more than plot for 1-2 chapters, then things like that are what you should consider early on in order to make it interesting and to make characters more human.

For me, simply stating that conflict emerged from 'conflicting views' is pretty bland and not something I would do in my own story, especially if it's supposed to be a bigger plot point and not an event that ends in 10 paragraphs.


In the world that this is set in, bounty hunting is not illegal but it is often discouraged and frowned upon, because they tend to have shady connections and can often get away with things that the royal soldiers can't. Such as killing somebody and getting paid for it. In this story, the MC has gained a reputation as a hunter with a natural talent for violence. She'll mutilate you and make a joke about it. I was thinking that at some point in the past, the MC hunted down and killed the soldier's girlfriend because she was secretly a wanted smuggler for sneaking in magical artifacts that are banned in the country. The MC killed her and the soldier found out and swore revenge. Even though he was informed of his girlfriend's crimes he still hated her for it. 

He acknowledges the fact that what his girlfriend did was wrong, and that he could've saved her from herself, but he still hates the MC for taking her away from him. He still doesn't like the MC because of her lifestyle and indifference to killing, but he hates her for hurting him. Either that or have some random hunter kill his girl in the past and having him blame all hunters for his loss. 

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#8
Making one of - supposedly important - antagonists an inconsistent uter hypocrite isn't a good move. You can't have someone righteous know that his woman was killed because she was commiting serious crimes and then swear revenge on the killer. Choose one of the two, don't combine things that exclude one-another. (unless you are skilled enough to pull off the inner conflict and character's steady breakdown, alongside the degeneration of his morals and principles... but it doesn't feel like you are aiming for that)

Making off-handed motivations is fine, as I said, but it makes for bland antagonists if they appear for a longer period of time instead of  a little while just to get killed right afterward.

Also, I don't really buy the reason for why bounty hunters are frowned upon in your world. It might be because you only fleshed it out and I hadn't had the chance to catch the detailed plan of yours, but if you rely on broad and unspecific things like 'They get paid for killing' (but don't they kill / capture crimilans...?), that they are violent (who cares if they are if it's towards criminals? Unless you make more to this point), or that 'they are involved in shady things', duh that they are... they are basically criminals who earn their money by killing/capturing other criminals, or are they not? You should make this clear instead of relying on vague terms like those above as it will not feel grounded in reality and it will limit your ability to flesh out the world, the scenes and the events as you write new chapters.

If you want to make the commonplace disdain for the profession appear to have more of a basis, I suggest adding some events that the general public of your world can refer to. They can steem from their the Royals going abroad with their use of the bounty hunters or the famous stories where the powerful bounty hunters went too far and ended up 'accidentally' killing many people while on their mission. You can include an Association for the hunters wich wields huge power and influence, thus making common poeple and weaker noble families fearful of dealing with them, what only escalates the problems with acting-out bounty hunters as they feel as if they are above the law.

Just a few examples Wink

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#9
Caladbolg Wrote: Making one of - supposedly important - antagonists an inconsistent uter hypocrite isn't a good move. You can't have someone righteous know that his woman was killed because she was commiting serious crimes and then swear revenge on the killer. Choose one of the two, don't combine things that exclude one-another. (unless you are skilled enough to pull off the inner conflict and character's steady breakdown, alongside the degeneration of his morals and principles... but it doesn't feel like you are aiming for that)

Making off-handed motivations is fine, as I said, but it makes for bland antagonists if they appear for a longer period of time instead of  a little while just to get killed right afterward.

Also, I don't really buy the reason for why bounty hunters are frowned upon in your world. It might be because you only fleshed it out and I hadn't had the chance to catch the detailed plan of yours, but if you rely on broad and unspecific things like 'They get paid for killing' (but don't they kill / capture crimilans...?), that they are violent (who cares if they are if it's towards criminals? Unless you make more to this point), or that 'they are involved in shady things', duh that they are... they are basically criminals who earn their money by killing/capturing other criminals, or are they not? You should make this clear instead of relying on vague terms like those above as it will not feel grounded in reality and it will limit your ability to flesh out the world, the scenes and the events as you write new chapters.

If you want to make the commonplace disdain for the profession appear to have more of a basis, I suggest adding some events that the general public of your world can refer to. They can steem from their the Royals going abroad with their use of the bounty hunters or the famous stories where the powerful bounty hunters went too far and ended up 'accidentally' killing many people while on their mission. You can include an Association for the hunters wich wields huge power and influence, thus making common poeple and weaker noble families fearful of dealing with them, what only escalates the problems with acting-out bounty hunters as they feel as if they are above the law.

Just a few examples Wink


Ok, instead of the MC killing the soldier's girlfriend because she was a smuggler, I can change it so that she was a normal girl who just got caught in the crossfire when the soldier was fighting a random bounty hunter, and when she got killed he forms a hatred of all hunters. That sound better? I was thinking of making him a recurring enemy for the MC as he tries to bring her down no matter what, mainly because she is one of the toughest hunters in the country. And maybe later they put aside their rivalry and work together to defeat the big bad. Idk, it 's just an idea. 

I do have an idea of why bounty hunters are put in a bad light, but I was just giving broad examples of why they are discouraged. The world that this story is set in is morally grey, every warrior has some selfish reason for being who they are. You're either a psychopath, a jerk, or an idiot who was too dumb to live. This is also kind of why the MC tries to find humor in almost everything she does, as she feels like most soldiers and hunters take themselves too seriously. I'll work on the lore of the country and its people. But there isn't a distinct hatred for the profession, it's just not encouraged. Kind of like how it's not really encouraged in real life because it is a dangerous and shady career choice. 

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#10
Nah, it doesn't sound better. However, I'm starting to feel like you simply haven't read enough to realize it just yet, so me repeating the same thing over and over is more or less pointless. It might be just me who's a plot-freak who loves to have everything motivated and fleshed out though, so don't take what I just said to heart.

As for the overall setting, I'm still not convinced, but it definitely sounds better than in the beggining.

My suggestion for you would be to downscale the 'scale' in which your story is happening, at least for the first 500 pages. Keep it local, at max to one city+neighboring area and the people who might get involved with the matters of this place. Try to get a feel for how setting up such an enviroment works for you and how readers react to it, and only then broaden the scale to country/continent/world. You need some experience first and jumping straight into deep waters that require you to plan-out and set-up many things all at once what might prove to be counterproductive. If you go with this approach do try to remember that the city can't be a straight-out representative of the relations and politics of the entire world and instead needs to be a more localized phenomena. There would be no point to limit yourself to a smaller area if you tried to flesh out the entire world anyway, lol.

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#11
Caladbolg Wrote: Nah, it doesn't sound better. However, I'm starting to feel like you simply haven't read enough to realize it just yet, so me repeating the same thing over and over is more or less pointless. It might be just me who's a plot-freak who loves to have everything motivated and fleshed out though, so don't take what I just said to heart.

As for the overall setting, I'm still not convinced, but it definitely sounds better than in the beggining.

My suggestion for you would be to downscale the 'scale' in which your story is happening, at least for the first 500 pages. Keep it local, at max to one city+neighboring area and the people who might get involved with the matters of this place. Try to get a feel for how setting up such an enviroment works for you and how readers react to it, and only then broaden the scale to country/continent/world. You need some experience first and jumping straight into deep waters that require you to plan-out and set-up many things all at once what might prove to be counterproductive. If you go with this approach do try to remember that the city can't be a straight-out representative of the relations and politics of the entire world and instead needs to be a more localized phenomena. There would be no point to limit yourself to a smaller area if you tried to flesh out the entire world anyway, lol.


Not sure what else to do then, I want there to be a legit reason for the soldier to hate the MC and try and take her in. I also want him to be a character that the readers will love to hate. Like whenever he fails at apprehending her the readers will feel very satisfied by it. The other option I had was to instead make him a rival bounty hunter who has a superiority complex when compared to the MC, but even that sounds repetitive. 

So, I should have the MC take care of bounties within her general area rather than have her travel the country? Like only have her hunt in local cities and towns near her or just in the town she lives in? 

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#12
Okay, now we are gettin somewhere - you brough up 'a character they will love to hate', and you also said that you want a legit reason for the soldier to hate - not just dislike - the MC. So, while you are of course free to tweak it or not use it at all, or only use it as a reference, I personally would set it up like that: (and I would indluce all of this development into the story instead of simply leaving it to 'it had all happened before book 1')

- Let's start with the reason for hate. First and foremost, before you try to set up the reason, you have to have the character of the soldier worked out, alongside his backstory. After all, the same event will not cause every type of a character to react in the same way. Just look at how you wanted a rigeteous character pursue revenge while he was fully aware that his loved one was killed for perfectly justifiable reasons and even within the bound of law! Wink


* I like to make things 'spicy' in character relationships, for so how about going at it that way. Your MC visits a grave of a dead friend somewhere in the first chapters and either by MC's internal pondering or her monologue to herself we, the readers, learn that the one in the grave is MC's companion, a woman with whom she used to do missions with. Let's also say that MC had many times insisted on taking on risky tasks just to challenge her limits, or, if you want a more noble reason, you can make MC's husband/family need money for expensive medical treatment or to pay off loans. MC knew her friend was tight on money herself so she never told her, as the woman was too good-hearted and would probably try to help her at her own expense, which MC didn't want to happen. So, they did those risky missions - MC can reminisce about it by the woman's grave - and finally, at one of them, MC screwed something up - up to you what it is. However, as a result, MC's friend ended up saving the MC at the cost of her own life.

* Then, a few chapters later, we see the first interaction of MC and the soldeir, who let's say starts off with making some petty formality-related trouble for her and in the bits of angry dialogue they exchange, we learn that MC's dead friend was the soldiers fiancee or maybe even wife. The soldier, in this version, is a very upright and law-abilding, virtuous person, but he had learned how his wife died from either the Bounty Association or from the mission reports the Royal Family has. Thus, he can't help but detest MC even though he is internally conflicted about his feelings. He knows that if he wants to follow his life principles he shouldn't hate MC, but he can't help it, he had loved his fiancee/wife too much. So, to vent his frustration, he causes various kinds of trouble for MC from small day-to-day annoyances to spreading bad rumors about her, smearing her reputation etc. Ofc, he does everything more or less secretly or while pretending to just be doing his duty as the soldier since he himself is conflicted about his actions.

* Next, let us say that it involves the latest mission MC has taken after coming to the Royal Capital and having those annoyances with the soldier. In a way, while doing this mission, MC gets obstructed along the way by something that is the result of the soldier's meddling. Be it MC's smeared reputation or a random soldier stopping her at the worst time and blowing her cower at the critical moment, anything is fine. The important point is that MC is in a lot of danger because of that and then, while trying to presere her life, some innocent people get involved - again, up to you how that could happen. The thing is, one of the casualties is the young son of the soldier's brother. In other words, the soldier's nephew - once the soldier learns of this, once he sees the boy's body, something breaks inside him. His sense of justice gets wraped and as the story goes, he starts to intefere and straight-up attempt to get your MC killed by various secretive means. To spice it all up, you can have your MC advance in the ranks of the bounty hunters while the soldier climbs the ranks of Imperial Soldiers, each of them racking up their own achievments.

Okay, that's enough for now, haha. Can you see how in this version the possible plot points you can use are super interesting and very varied? How the soldied, who I think you wanted to be a good man seeking his revenge, slowly gets distorted and turns more evil as the time goes? How character progression of the soldier and MC can be far more interesting than simply having a one-dimensional character turn up every now and then and casue trouble for MC? Wink

---

As for the smaller scale - it's not really all that much about restricting yourself to a small area as what the consequence of doing so ought to be. Do not try to describe 'common truths' of the world, that the bounty hunters are frowned upon etc etc. Instead, follow your MC and show us how she is treated throughout the story. Describe the Bounty Hunter Association or something like that in some chapter, introduce supporting characters and through them flesh out the politics and social standings of the world you want to make. Don't just describe 'common truths' without something to back them up. The problem with starting from the tail-end of the setting is that you need to be skilled and creative enough to create a setting that would logically fit the outcome you've already stated as truth, see? And when you are describing not just the small area but the kingdom/continent/world, it gets harder and more complicated since everything should fit together in one way or another. If you don't do that and only focus on thinking 'what scenes, events, or settings of the world, would be cool to have?' and write only to display them, you will end up with the same mess 99% of the movies in the last 10+ years ended up with. You will only get a world and scenes full of wish-fulfilment events which are supposed to make the reader/viewer emotional and excited, but they only make him sad since nothing was earned, worked for, set-up properly or created in a logically consistent way.

Re: Quick Help With Some Motivation

#13
Caladbolg Wrote: Okay, now we are gettin somewhere - you brough up 'a character they will love to hate', and you also said that you want a legit reason for the soldier to hate - not just dislike - the MC. So, while you are of course free to tweak it or not use it at all, or only use it as a reference, I personally would set it up like that: (and I would indluce all of this development into the story instead of simply leaving it to 'it had all happened before book 1')

- Let's start with the reason for hate. First and foremost, before you try to set up the reason, you have to have the character of the soldier worked out, alongside his backstory. After all, the same event will not cause every type of a character to react in the same way. Just look at how you wanted a rigeteous character pursue revenge while he was fully aware that his loved one was killed for perfectly justifiable reasons and even within the bound of law! Wink


* I like to make things 'spicy' in character relationships, for so how about going at it that way. Your MC visits a grave of a dead friend somewhere in the first chapters and either by MC's internal pondering or her monologue to herself we, the readers, learn that the one in the grave is MC's companion, a woman with whom she used to do missions with. Let's also say that MC had many times insisted on taking on risky tasks just to challenge her limits, or, if you want a more noble reason, you can make MC's husband/family need money for expensive medical treatment or to pay off loans. MC knew her friend was tight on money herself so she never told her, as the woman was too good-hearted and would probably try to help her at her own expense, which MC didn't want to happen. So, they did those risky missions - MC can reminisce about it by the woman's grave - and finally, at one of them, MC screwed something up - up to you what it is. However, as a result, MC's friend ended up saving the MC at the cost of her own life.

* Then, a few chapters later, we see the first interaction of MC and the soldeir, who let's say starts off with making some petty formality-related trouble for her and in the bits of angry dialogue they exchange, we learn that MC's dead friend was the soldiers fiancee or maybe even wife. The soldier, in this version, is a very upright and law-abilding, virtuous person, but he had learned how his wife died from either the Bounty Association or from the mission reports the Royal Family has. Thus, he can't help but detest MC even though he is internally conflicted about his feelings. He knows that if he wants to follow his life principles he shouldn't hate MC, but he can't help it, he had loved his fiancee/wife too much. So, to vent his frustration, he causes various kinds of trouble for MC from small day-to-day annoyances to spreading bad rumors about her, smearing her reputation etc. Ofc, he does everything more or less secretly or while pretending to just be doing his duty as the soldier since he himself is conflicted about his actions.

* Next, let us say that it involves the latest mission MC has taken after coming to the Royal Capital and having those annoyances with the soldier. In a way, while doing this mission, MC gets obstructed along the way by something that is the result of the soldier's meddling. Be it MC's smeared reputation or a random soldier stopping her at the worst time and blowing her cower at the critical moment, anything is fine. The important point is that MC is in a lot of danger because of that and then, while trying to presere her life, some innocent people get involved - again, up to you how that could happen. The thing is, one of the casualties is the young son of the soldier's brother. In other words, the soldier's nephew - once the soldier learns of this, once he sees the boy's body, something breaks inside him. His sense of justice gets wraped and as the story goes, he starts to intefere and straight-up attempt to get your MC killed by various secretive means. To spice it all up, you can have your MC advance in the ranks of the bounty hunters while the soldier climbs the ranks of Imperial Soldiers, each of them racking up their own achievments.

Okay, that's enough for now, haha. Can you see how in this version the possible plot points you can use are super interesting and very varied? How the soldied, who I think you wanted to be a good man seeking his revenge, slowly gets distorted and turns more evil as the time goes? How character progression of the soldier and MC can be far more interesting than simply having a one-dimensional character turn up every now and then and casue trouble for MC? Wink

---

As for the smaller scale - it's not really all that much about restricting yourself to a small area as what the consequence of doing so ought to be. Do not try to describe 'common truths' of the world, that the bounty hunters are frowned upon etc etc. Instead, follow your MC and show us how she is treated throughout the story. Describe the Bounty Hunter Association or something like that in some chapter, introduce supporting characters and through them flesh out the politics and social standings of the world you want to make. Don't just describe 'common truths' without something to back them up. The problem with starting from the tail-end of the setting is that you need to be skilled and creative enough to create a setting that would logically fit the outcome you've already stated as truth, see? And when you are describing not just the small area but the kingdom/continent/world, it gets harder and more complicated since everything should fit together in one way or another. If you don't do that and only focus on thinking 'what scenes, events, or settings of the world, would be cool to have?' and write only to display them, you will end up with the same mess 99% of the movies in the last 10+ years ended up with. You will only get a world and scenes full of wish-fulfilment events which are supposed to make the reader/viewer emotional and excited, but they only make him sad since nothing was earned, worked for, set-up properly or created in a logically consistent way.


Hmm, you've definitely given me a lot to think about. The idea between the bounty hunter and the soldier does seem appealing. I'm just a little concerned if said idea might conflict with my original idea for the story. It does sound cool to me. I would like to explain more in detail about the type of story I'd like to tell if you're still interested. Can I PM you to avoid revealing spoilers here or should I just explain everything on this forum?