Original ONGOING Action Adventure Fantasy Mystery Anti-Hero Lead Magic Male Lead Secret Identity Supernatural
Warning This fiction contains:
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Faerie-tale creatures return, kidnapping humans from their homes and putting them back in a world gone mad. They’re given “gifts”. Some become giants, others knights, and stealthy killers. They fight each other and magical beasts for resources and power.

Lance is one of those taken his home in the middle of the night. Mysteries are dangled in front of him like a lure. Everything has a price and anything can be bought. He struggles to retain his humanity, survive, and unravel the secrets of his fantasy ravaged hometown.

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Nicbrightside
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Abit trippy, then walks fairly well known ground

But at least it didn't go LitRPG thank god.

This review is having read Book 1, Rule 22 and contains spoilers.

Style:

A first person, journal-esque type story with various future interjections from the main character himself. Some people may find this approach annoying. Some people may say first person story telling is for the unintuitive or inexperienced. I'd agree that a poorly done first person perspective is due to that, but I do not find the choice to be any detractor from the author's ability to paint a picture, namely because you are technically reading a book within a book.

 Grammar:

Mistakes are few and far between, in the chapters I have read I probably encountered or at least noticed less than half a dozen, and even those were minor at best.

Story:

I feel I understand what the author was going for. Paint us a near psychedelic explanation for a post apocolyptia with monsters and magic. So many authors (especially on this fucking site) go the same route and just cop out with a 'Ding dong this is your new world announcement system, you now all have RPG stats and the orcs will be entering your room to invade your anus in five minutes, good luck'. Here is an author who bothered to, maybe not fully explain, but at least show why and give the reader the chance to fathom the true explanation behind it. 

 I'd say there are two main parts to this story so far; The psychedelic abduction series of chapters and everything that follows after. Could the abduction chapters be better conveyed? Well maybe, then again perhaps if a clearer picture was obtained of the whole ordeal we'd lose some of the mesmerising, dream-like effect the author might have been going for.  

 After the main characters return to 'reality' is when we get into the fairly well known ground, as in 'new stuff added to existing world, bake until it vaguely resembles a dream you might have after playing every RPG made in the last ten years in one week with no sleep'. But as I very well stated at the top, Thank fuck it's not a LitRPG. A weaker author would have just thrown in some stats, levels and whatever else gaming bullshit he felt like plopping in, but not this author. 

 Yes, there are plenty of very video game-like elements, but thank the stars he didn't feel the same sexual compunction so many other authors in this site feel and need to quantify everything with a splatter of numbers discharged from some orifice. There is a healing potion, but he didn't feel the need to tell us how many hit points it restores. There are magical skills, but he didn't feel the need to tell us how many points of damage they do. Thank you, from the bottom of my heart. If it wasn't already clear I depise LitRPGs with a passion. 

So overall, an interesting explanation to the new world order that might need a -tiny- bit of polishing followed by well trodden post-apocalyptic stuff without numbers, but I still feel the need to mark it down a tad because it's not exactly an original idea in the grand scheme of things. 

Character:

So far we haven't had too much exploration into any supporting cast members. There have been a good dose of side characters so far and  their motivations and personalities can be eluded to in some degree, but far more of the effort in development is focused on the main character. 

 The author does what I think is a good effort in showing the effects on disability and the resulting non-physical fractures such injuries can cause. Depression, withdrawal from society, possible dependence on substance. Here we have what would appear to be a previously out-going young man thrown a curve ball by the universe prior to the story and giving a different reason for being a bit of a loner. So many other stories would just go with 'Oh I like gaming, I don't like people' because it rather stinks of the author's personal experience. Here we at least get a different, more compelling reason for why someone might wander onto a suspicious bus manned by suspicious people in the middle of the night, mistaking it for some opiate-insomnia induced hallucination. I'd also like to point out that I've never suffered from any sort of hallucination but I do like to think that I'd have the good grace to realise even if it is a hallucination, not to get on any weird buses, but maybe thats just me. 

The explanation for why the main character, and in fact most of the supporting cast, aren't very well adjusted people is well established in the whole premise of the power system, they have a price. This is a good explanation I find for why the hero quickly gets over his squeamishness towards violence. I know we'd all like to think in the same type of situation we could pick up a shovel and bash skulls to bits but lets face it, none of us will know until the zombie apocalypse, so it's always a cop out when the hero of one of these stories is just suddenly fine with killing things, I'd bet money on the author of those types of stories never having killed anything bigger than a frog. Turns out in this story getting some weird bearded man in a run down strip mall to ram a bunch of broken, potentially magical artefacts into your skill book thingy is going to have some sort of unwanted side-effect. Explosive magic in that book of yours? Enjoy a good dose of pyromania. A spell to give you a beautiful bronzed body? Hope you like almost creaming your pants just by turning this spell on. Not only do they provide character quirks and give the author extra bits to write about, but it also allows for growth, change and extra depth in terms of character. 

 Oh and of course with stories on RR you have to ask yourself, is the main character OP? I wouldn't say so. Is he perhaps stronger than those around him? I'd say so, through his general route to problem solving is in the vein of 'smart application of abilities' rather than just whipping his deus ex machina dick out and clobbering people with it. 

Overall:

A good read which I will definitely follow. But I'm still wondering about the title...

 

Azgul
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Enjoyed it so far as of chapter ten , dark and a bit trippy it is well written and worth reading for the mini-orcs alone

Humanprototype
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As with 2 out of 4 Novels from this author I have tried... Initially I really enjoy them, but as I read minor flaws in style, pacing, and plot choices compound until I get too annoyed to continue. Also like some of this authors other stories the plot is structured as a mountain of questions and mysteries piled one on top the next with only the barest trickle of answers, if any. It reminds me of the tv series Lost, and not in a good way.

The post notes and statements are very distracting and largely irrelevant.

The MC started out quiet, introverted, and bitter, which was fine. But by chap 11 or 12 hes turned near mute and possibly autistic with no clear explanation, I would guess because of the trauma and changes hes been through. The problem is him acting like that means the story consists almost entirely of fragmentary, one-sided dialogue and endless, long-winded inner monologue.  

Newbage
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Three dimensional characters with realistic motivations and reactions. Believable dialogue. Sympathetic and likeable protagonist. Interesting plot. Excellent mastery of grammar and prose. No contrived "system" shoehorned in as a creative crutch. No overused tropes present. This I'd professional grade work, that is a few cuts above what you'd ordinarily expect to find on Royal Road.

Kartho
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Another work of art from FrustratedEgo

To begin, I will explain the title of this review. You might go; "Who is FrustratedEgo," "Why do I care," "What is the meaning of life, the universe, and everything?" I can't answer all these questions, not yet, but I'll be sure to try my best.

FrustratedEgo

This is a man who I am constantly suprised to see on Royal Road. He writes with aplomb, humor, and an established sense of personal style. It seems he is in an odd superposition of being a veteran writer and simultaneously discovering the joy of storytelling anew. He has written at least four other works, and time and time again I settle down with a smile and anticipation as I spot his newest fiction rising on trending. He helps combat the reputation this site has for shoddy grammer and slapdash plot design.

Enough with my admiration for this author however, this review is about Liars Called.

Style: 4 / 5

I'm being cautious with this rating not because the style is inconsistent, but because Liars Called has a very distinct style that might not be for everyone. FrustratedEgo has developed this hazy, murky atmosphere that invades all aspects of this story, and this uncertainty can be, dare I say it, frustrating for someone who likes a clean cut clinical retelling. Liars Called is not that, not by any means. A persistent feature of the fiction are interjections, reminding me vaguely of Bartimaeus trilogy by Jonathan Stroud. The story is presented as a diary, with quick quips, reflections, and explanations written by an older, and presumably wiser protagonist. The approach is unique on the platform, and the style itself is integral to Liars Called.

Story: 4 / 5

Much like the Style, I hesitate to go any higher because of the niche nature of Liars Called. It follows our protagonist as he staggers through his life after a mysterious and abrupt change in reality as we know it, with little clear direction of narrative arc, and in doing so maintains its consistency and dedication to being entirely character driven. The plot unfolds as a consequence of the world and this in it, feeling seamless and natural to the reader. I enjoy the story in part because much like our protagonist I'm trying to understand these people and changes, to come to terms with the new world we are presented with. It is new, it is refreshing, and it deserves all the praise I give it and more.

Grammer: 4.5 / 5

If you look through my profile, you will likely notice that I generally write reviews about fiction that impresses me. A common theme of these fictions will be a steady grasp of gramatical rules, and an abscence of glaring errors in the prose. FrustratedEgo writes well and writes cleanly, and Liars Called is no different. With plans declared for further editing and proofreading in the future, in this aspect Liars Called nearly achieves perfection.

Character: 4.5 / 5

As mentioned earlier, the fictions appears to be entirely character driven, and throughout the novel the characters are consistent, well rounded and act realistically. To be fair, in the situations that occur I'm not sure what the standard of realism is, but they talk and act in a manner that is established as they are introduced and reinforced with each piece of screen time. These characters are clearly explored, have untapped depths, and will continue to allow the reader to empathize or connect with in a variety of ways.

Overall: 4.5 / 5

Yes, this is not a purely mathmatical average of the prior scores. Yes, I am clearly enthusiastic about Liars Called, and yes, you should certainly give it a try. I'm not sure what else to say, so I'll not take up more of your time. Its good. Should you enjoy it, or wish to see other fictions by a writer of high quality, visit FrustratedEgo's profile and check out his other works.

Zarfas
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A dark fantasy, a real Fairy Tale of old

One of the most thrilling stories on this site. A dark fantasy at it's peak of potential. Reminds me of the good old fairy tales, the real kind. With changlings and dangers at the crossroads, but rewards as well... if only you know the rules and resist temptation. One hell of a story

Aki1red
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Read the 1st 5 chapters and fall in love

Surprisingly really good I highly recommend it 

Andross Guile
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This is perhaps the worst style I've ever read on RRL. Interjecting statements from an omniscient entity are annoying in general. I didn't like it when it was masterfully done in "The Book Thief" and I certainly hate it done by a rank amateur.

Characters can' breathe if you don't let them live without making incessant comments. A reader certainly does not need the foreknowledge of what is happening. It destroys suspense. 

What irritates me far more than this terrible storytelling tool is that the author clearly has experience writing and still makes that AWFUL and infuriating faux pas. 

Seriously, get rid of those comments and I'd continue reading. And don't worry, anyone can suspend their disbelief for a bit.