The Eternity Acts

by tripleblacktri

Original HIATUS Adventure Drama Fantasy Magic

The Whisperer Rayon cursed his villagers, summoned a Wall of Fire and created a Burning Sea to mold his kingdom into a place he deemed worth living in.

150 years later and the Whisperer Rayon is gone, but his acts remain. Will the villagers, whose curse changes them by night, be able to overcome the acts of this twisted madman to create a society free from his acts? It may take centuries, but the last Whisperer will certainly try...

If you enjoy The Eternity Acts, check out the first book (tweaked and edited many times) here on Amazon. If you'd like a free copy of the Ramodeus prequel, click here. Thank you!


Here are the maps for both arcs.

Book 3 coming soon!

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tripleblacktri

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FeliciaDenise
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The Eternity Acts: Short Stories

The Eternity Acts: Short Stories are companion pieces of The Eternity Acts, a currently available web-based science-fiction fantasy serial. The author posts new installments twice weekly, and short stories in the interim.

While the main story plays out in The Eternity Acts, Short Stories delves deeper taking nothing away from the main story or leaving the reader with a list of characters far too long to remember. Arrogance and privilege are juxtaposed next to poverty, cruelty, and inhumane treatment.

The world-building is unique and interesting.

Cursed by a prior king, the kingdom of Elodine is surrounded by a wall of fire and its residents transform into animal form at dusk and change back at dawn. No one knows why or how he placed the curse and no one has been able to break it.

Despite the animal forms they live in through the night, it’s the humanness that still controls the hearts of men. As generations pass, differences are focused on, class systems are created and many are enslaved.

In these fourteen stories, we see life lived through the eyes of members of all classes. The elite remains on top through arrogant, high-handed laws enforced by a police corps prone to favor strong-arm tactics and torture over due process.

The poor and enslaved have had enough.

Rebellion is coming to Ikalga… and all Elodine... and everyone has a part to play.

This is quite a large undertaking for any writer, but this new author has handled it extremely well, maintaining flow and continuity.

I highly recommend this book of short side stories and its online parent. Regardless of your preferred genre, this is an enjoyable read.

 

Enjoy!

 

SamChapman
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If you’re looking for an adventure story...

If you’re looking for an adventure story with likable heroes, an evil king, magic, and animal shapeshifters, plus a broad and well-developed world, you could do a whole lot worse than The Eternity Acts. The author keeps the main story moving along at a fine clip, through many adventures as the heroes follow a rebel king in his attempt to take down the vicious system established by an evil wizard.

Jochro, the main narrator, is a slave who gets handpicked by King Acetate to help protect Anroma, a powerful young Whisperer (magic user) who offers his kingdom a chance at a better life. His journey explores the various ramifications of the universe’s main conceit: every character transforms into an animal form at night, a form that has a great deal of import to their character and behavior. In addition to exploring these issues, the story quickly reveals that some "hybrids" have the ability to transform during the day, an engaging mystery to be solved.

The world is expanded on with several short stories tangentially related to the main tale—these are optional reading, but I highly recommend them, as they make things make more sense. There are almost no noticeable grammatical or style errors in The Eternity Acts—the story is extremely easy to read.

If I have one issue, it’s that things don’t necessarily get defined as quickly as it would be convenient to know them. I carried some expectations about the setting that took a long time to be debunked—such as believing from the premise that there was no greenery left in the world, or that everyone was a slave. In addition, Acetate’s role and the nature of magic are left uncertain for a long time at the beginning. But the worldbuilding clears up ts the author finds his feet.

All in all, I’d say this is one of the most worthwhile web serials I’ve come across.

PROS: Great pacing, likeable characters, interesting world, good action CONS: Some confusing elements

allian
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I was pleasantly surprised with this story, as it isn't a genre I normally read. There was little error grammar-wise, which was pleasant. The story itself has good direction, is coherent and pacing. However, I'm still a little confused about some of the inner-workings of the world, but that understanding may come with more entries of the book. The author keeps the book witty/humorous which adds interest to an already interesting plot line. The characters overall are well developed, and have quirky or interesting traits that kept me engaged with the storyline. Although there are a few characters that could be improved upon, I thought this was a good start to the book. I would love to know more about Anroma.

stwillett
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Great start; can't wait for more!

Overall, this story is great - the world is original, the characters are unique and the story itself is engaging and evenly paced.

Grammar:
Little to no errors found grammatically.  The author is consistent, vocabulary is varied and there are no issues with spelling or tenses found so far.

Style:
The story flows well, and the author does a great job of introducing details on an "as you go" basis.  Each chapter contains details that unfold and explain a little bit more of the world and the characters within it.  This helps to keep me as a reader engaged and coming back for more.  The story is in the first person with a character that isn't dry.  Characters are quirky and humorous which lend to improve the author's style.

Story:
The story is overall great and flows well as you read it.  Everything is sequential and the author doesn't jump around.  The descriptions are great, although sometimes technical, and are sufficient in setting the tones and creating the imagery the reader needs.  The story is filled with original dialogue and is an enjoyable read.  The world and its issues are unique to the author and very intriguing - he really creates a complete picture of the world and its history which aids in building the story's clarity.

Character:
Characters are plenty, but no overwhelming.  Each has their own personality and quirks which are clear throughout the story - I can't wait to see how they develop more over time as more is added to the storyline.

brostigno
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Original and promising start

Hi, it's my first review. I'm writing it as of chapter 4/5, I may update it as times goes by, but for now it's enough to say that this is an good start for an interesting story.

Style :

There's isn't much to criticize here. I can only say it's very good. It's fluid, it reads well. The pace is easily conveyed and the descriptions never feel overbearing or like they're dumped on the reader. The narration is in the first person POV and it's very consistent, and I enjoy very much the undertones of sarcasm and comedy I find sometimes, the overall style helps fleshing out the character's personality.

Story :

It seems the plot kicks in early. The world is original, though not much is known about it yet. To avoid spoiling, the protagonist is basically somewhat dragged into a great venture that should prove to be rather difficult, but he looks pretty nonchalent about all this. The only criticism I could have is that the world feels confusing at first. But in the end it's relevant, because the characters are living in mysterious conditions, in a curious, isolated place and under the rule of an enigmatic king who keeps his secrets close. A new king is crowned and intends to change quite a lot of things, and he convinces the protagonist to help him.
I didn't really know what to think about the people turning into animals when I started reading, but it looks like the author is handling it well. Very little is told to the reader, things are mostly showed and suggested. Hints are dropped about the world, politics, magic, the psychological consequences of turning into an animal, etc.
So it's a bit confusing, I don't mind it personnaly, it makes you wonder (in the good way) how it will turn out. I'll probably up the score once the plot and world-building have developped a bit.

Grammar :

I have nothing to say here. Perfect spelling, rich and varied vocabulary, without it being pompous and heavy. I tried to look for some mistakes but the grammar is beyond reproach. If there are errors, they're almost invisible.

 

Characters :

It's too soon to talk about character developpement, but for now I can say they're likable.
The protagonist, Jochro, is a slave and like I said he's suddenly getting involved in a large plot, but he seems alright with it. His POV makes him an enjoyable character, cool-headed and kind of cynical and snarky (major boon for me). He's resourceful enough to keep things interesting even when he has no clue what is happening around him.
The king is also a promising character. He's the eccentric kind of guy, he seems very friendly and everything but in the end he is partly clouded in mystery, you can't help thinking he has circumstances and secrets and whatnot.
Anroma is a little girl, and suprisingly, very likable, even if we haven't seen a lot of her at the moment. Not whiny and immature, rather smart and teasing, but she's still credible as a seven y-o girl. Even if she has very peculiar circumstances, she's still a child, but she doesn't fall into a stereotype, be it the whiny brat, the arrogant brat, or whatnot.

 

Overall :
Give it a try. This story hasn't much exposure for now, maybe because there aren't many chapters out. But it's enjoyable and well written, and it's original.

Joe Berridge Beale
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The Eternity Acts Chapter 1 and 2

I read Chapter 1: Jochro and Chapter 2: Acetate.

Style

Pros:

Your sentencing is very readable, well crafted, and flows quite well. For the most part, Jochro's narration is believable, sympathetic, and engaging.

Cons: 

Too much telling; not enough showing. You put too much emphasis on exposition and not enough on showing the world and exhibiting Jochro's experiences in it. For example, you start out explaining Jochro's whole backstory, but it doesn't really make sense for Jochro to be recalling all this to himself. It makes sense to let the reader know the basic details, but Jochro already knows everything. It would be better to show the essentials of the backstory (but not everything; the reader doesn't need to know everything from the start) through action within the story. If Jorchro is a werebeast slave in the land of an evil overlord, show that through having him do slave work as a werebeast whilst describing the look of the terrible world. You need to put more effort into putting the reader in Jochro's shoes: at the moment, I don't know what the setting looks like, I don't know what Jochro feels like as a slave (exshausted and aching most probably), or much else. Including sensory details in general will help with this.   

 

Story

Pros:

I like the concept of Jochro being a labour slave and the hellish portrayal of his life. I would have actually liked to see you expand more on the werebeast slave society within the Trading Union Trash Unit. You don't often get to see life from a slave's point of view in fantasy since its predominantly set in medieval settings. 

Cons: 

Mostly because of the abundance of exposition, not enough action seems to be happening. So far, Jochro has had a fight with his fellow slaves and then been hired by Aceot to do... something (I'm not sure what). While the first scene could stand expanding, the second with Acetate is far too bogged down with unnessary exposition to pace nicely. If I were you, I'd have Acetate kidnap Jochro and briefly explain what he wanted him to do. For example: 'I'm Ace, the Second Sacred King. I want you to help me overthrow the evil overlord with your werebeast powers by "insert quest".' 

 

Grammar

Almost perfect. Make sure you capitalise the first letter of every new line of dialogue.

 

Character

I like Jochro's snarkiness, but that's the only stand out impression I got from him. Acetate seems far too friendly to be a rebel leader but I like his charming nature nonetheless. You could do a bit more to flesh out the slave bullies.